discourse


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dis·course

 (dĭs′kôrs′)
n.
1. Verbal expression in speech or writing: political discourse.
2. Verbal exchange or conversation: listened to their discourse on foreign policy.
3. A formal, lengthy treatment of a subject, either written or spoken.
4. Archaic The process or power of reasoning.
v. (dĭ-skôrs′) dis·coursed, dis·cours·ing, dis·cours·es
v.intr.
1. To speak or write formally and at length. See Synonyms at speak.
2. To engage in conversation or discussion; converse: "The two men walked around the city and discoursed on its antiquities" (Michael Wood).
v.tr. Archaic
To narrate or discuss.

[Middle English discours, process of reasoning, from Medieval Latin discursus, from Latin, a running about, from past participle of discurrere, to run about : dis-, apart; see dis- + currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

dis·cours′er n.

discourse

n
1. verbal communication; talk; conversation
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a formal treatment of a subject in speech or writing, such as a sermon or dissertation
3. (Linguistics) a unit of text used by linguists for the analysis of linguistic phenomena that range over more than one sentence
4. archaic the ability to reason or the reasoning process
vb
5. (intr; often foll by on or upon) to speak or write (about) formally and extensively
6. (intr) to hold a discussion
7. (Music, other) (tr) archaic to give forth (music)
[C14: from Medieval Latin discursus argument, from Latin: a running to and fro, from discurrere to run different ways, from dis-1 + currere to run]
disˈcourser n

dis•course

(n. ˈdɪs kɔrs, -koʊrs, dɪsˈkɔrs, -ˈkoʊrs; v. dɪsˈkɔrs, -ˈkoʊrs)

n., v. -coursed, -cours•ing. n.
1. communication of thought by words; talk; conversation.
2. a formal discussion of a subject in speech or writing, as a treatise or sermon.
3. any unit of connected speech or writing longer than a sentence.
v.i.
4. to communicate thoughts orally; talk; converse.
5. to treat of a subject formally in speech or writing.
[1325–75; Middle English discours < Medieval Latin discursus (sp. by influence of Middle English cours course), Late Latin: conversation, Latin: running to and fro]
dis•cours′er, n.

discourse


Past participle: discoursed
Gerund: discoursing

Imperative
discourse
discourse
Present
I discourse
you discourse
he/she/it discourses
we discourse
you discourse
they discourse
Preterite
I discoursed
you discoursed
he/she/it discoursed
we discoursed
you discoursed
they discoursed
Present Continuous
I am discoursing
you are discoursing
he/she/it is discoursing
we are discoursing
you are discoursing
they are discoursing
Present Perfect
I have discoursed
you have discoursed
he/she/it has discoursed
we have discoursed
you have discoursed
they have discoursed
Past Continuous
I was discoursing
you were discoursing
he/she/it was discoursing
we were discoursing
you were discoursing
they were discoursing
Past Perfect
I had discoursed
you had discoursed
he/she/it had discoursed
we had discoursed
you had discoursed
they had discoursed
Future
I will discourse
you will discourse
he/she/it will discourse
we will discourse
you will discourse
they will discourse
Future Perfect
I will have discoursed
you will have discoursed
he/she/it will have discoursed
we will have discoursed
you will have discoursed
they will have discoursed
Future Continuous
I will be discoursing
you will be discoursing
he/she/it will be discoursing
we will be discoursing
you will be discoursing
they will be discoursing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been discoursing
you have been discoursing
he/she/it has been discoursing
we have been discoursing
you have been discoursing
they have been discoursing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been discoursing
you will have been discoursing
he/she/it will have been discoursing
we will have been discoursing
you will have been discoursing
they will have been discoursing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been discoursing
you had been discoursing
he/she/it had been discoursing
we had been discoursing
you had been discoursing
they had been discoursing
Conditional
I would discourse
you would discourse
he/she/it would discourse
we would discourse
you would discourse
they would discourse
Past Conditional
I would have discoursed
you would have discoursed
he/she/it would have discoursed
we would have discoursed
you would have discoursed
they would have discoursed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.discourse - extended verbal expression in speech or writingdiscourse - extended verbal expression in speech or writing
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
context, context of use, linguistic context - discourse that surrounds a language unit and helps to determine its interpretation
2.discourse - an address of a religious nature (usually delivered during a church service)discourse - an address of a religious nature (usually delivered during a church service)
church service, church - a service conducted in a house of worship; "don't be late for church"
speech, address - the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience; "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"
baccalaureate - a farewell sermon to a graduating class at their commencement ceremonies
kerugma, kerygma - preaching the gospel of Christ in the manner of the early church
evangelism - zealous preaching and advocacy of the gospel
homily, preachment - a sermon on a moral or religious topic
3.discourse - an extended communication (often interactive) dealing with some particular topicdiscourse - an extended communication (often interactive) dealing with some particular topic; "the book contains an excellent discussion of modal logic"; "his treatment of the race question is badly biased"
communicating, communication - the activity of communicating; the activity of conveying information; "they could not act without official communication from Moscow"
detail - extended treatment of particulars; "the essay contained too much detail"
dilation - a lengthy discussion (spoken or written) on a particular topic
consideration - a discussion of a topic (as in a meeting); "consideration of the traffic problem took more than an hour"
talk - discussion; (`talk about' is a less formal alternative for `discussion of'); "his poetry contains much talk about love and anger"
elaboration, enlargement, expansion - a discussion that provides additional information
Verb1.discourse - to consider or examine in speech or writing; "The author talks about the different aspects of this question"; "The class discussed Dante's `Inferno'"
deal, plow, handle, treat, cover, address - act on verbally or in some form of artistic expression; "This book deals with incest"; "The course covered all of Western Civilization"; "The new book treats the history of China"
descant - talk at great length about something of one's interest
talk shop - discuss matters that are related to work; "As soon as they met, the linguists started to talk shop"
2.discourse - carry on a conversation
argue, contend, debate, fence - have an argument about something
interview, question - conduct an interview in television, newspaper, and radio reporting
interview - discuss formally with (somebody) for the purpose of an evaluation; "We interviewed the job candidates"
interview - go for an interview in the hope of being hired; "The job candidate interviewed everywhere"
talk, speak - exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words"
chew the fat, chitchat, chit-chat, claver, confab, jaw, natter, shoot the breeze, chat, chaffer, confabulate, gossip, chatter, visit - talk socially without exchanging too much information; "the men were sitting in the cafe and shooting the breeze"
3.discourse - talk at length and formally about a topic; "The speaker dissertated about the social politics in 18th century England"
talk, speak - exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words"

discourse

noun
1. conversation, talk, discussion, speech, communication, chat, dialogue, converse a tradition of political discourse
2. speech, talk, address, essay, lecture, sermon, treatise, dissertation, homily, oration, disquisition He responds with a lengthy discourse on deployment strategy.
verb
1. talk, speak, discuss, debate, confer, converse, declaim, hold forth, expatiate He discoursed for several hours on English prose.

discourse

noun
1. The faculty, act, or product of speaking:
2. Spoken exchange:
Informal: confab.
Slang: jaw.
3. A formal, lengthy exposition of a topic:
verb
To engage in spoken exchange:
Informal: confab, visit.
Translations
会話会談対話

discourse

A. [ˈdɪskɔːs] N
1. (= talk) → conversación f, plática f (LAm)
2. (= essay) → tratado m
3. (Ling) → discurso m
B. [dɪsˈkɔːs] VI to discourse (up)on sthdisertar sobre algo
C. [ˈdɪskɔːs] CPD discourse analysis Nanálisis m inv del discurso

discourse

[ˈdɪskɔːrs]
n
(communication between people)conversation m
political discourse → débat m politique
(LINGUISTICS)discours m
(= speech) → discours m (= piece of writing) → dissertation f
[dɪsˈkɔːrs] vi (formal)discourir
to discourse on sth → discourir sur qch

discourse

nDiskurs m (geh)
vieinen Diskurs geben (geh); (= converse)einen Diskurs führen (geh)

discourse

[ˈdiskɔːs]
1. n
a. (disquisition) → dissertazione f
b. (conversation) → conversazione f; (written) → dissertazione f
2. vi to discourse on/upondissertare su
References in classic literature ?
This opening discourse is a parable in which Zarathustra discloses the mental development of all creators of new values.
This discourse extremely affected me, and called to my mind Friday's ecstasy when he met his father, and the poor people's ecstasy when I took them up at sea after their ship was on fire; the joy of the mate of the ship when he found himself delivered in the place where he expected to perish; and my own joy, when, after twenty-eight years' captivity, I found a good ship ready to carry me to my own country.
Thus he would refer to the shape of Madonna Lampiada's sumptuous eyelids, and to her shell-like ears, to the correct length and shape of Madonna Amororrisca's nose, to the lily tower of Madonna Verdespina's throat; nor would the unabashed old Florentine shrink from calling attention to the unfairness of Madonna Selvaggia's covering up her dainty bosom, just as he was about to discourse upon "those two hills of snow and of roses with two little crowns of fine rubies on their peaks.
And let his travel appear rather in his discourse, than his apparel or gesture; and in his discourse, let him be rather advised in his answers, than forward to tell stories; and let it appear that he doth not change his country manners, for those of foreign parts; but only prick in some flowers, of that he hath learned abroad, into the customs of his own country.
To this Square answered; that it was impossible to discourse philosophically concerning words, till their meaning was first established: that there were scarce any two words of a more vague and uncertain signification, than the two he had mentioned; for that there were almost as many different opinions concerning honour, as concerning religion.
During this discourse, my master was pleased to interrupt me several times.
He then remounted his feet, ascended to the pulpit, and resumed his discourse, making no allusion to the incident.
He appeared pleased and touched with the impression of this last discourse, and told me that he stood where he did before; that he had not been unfaithful to me in any one promise he had ever made yet, but that there were so many terrible things presented themselves to his view in the affair before me, and that on my account in particular, that he had thought of the other as a remedy so effectual as nothing could come up to it.
Continuing his discourse Don Quixote said: "As we began in the student's case with poverty and its accompaniments, let us see now if the soldier is richer, and we shall find that in poverty itself there is no one poorer; for he is dependent on his miserable pay, which comes late or never, or else on what he can plunder, seriously imperilling his life and conscience; and sometimes his nakedness will be so great that a slashed doublet serves him for uniform and shirt, and in the depth of winter he has to defend himself against the inclemency of the weather in the open field with nothing better than the breath of his mouth, which I need not say, coming from an empty place, must come out cold, contrary to the laws of nature.
When the viands and all the other entertainments that are usual in such banquets were finished, Oliverotto artfully began certain grave discourses, speaking of the greatness of Pope Alexander and his son Cesare, and of their enterprises, to which discourse Giovanni and others answered; but he rose at once, saying that such matters ought to be discussed in a more private place, and he betook himself to a chamber, whither Giovanni and the rest of the citizens went in after him.
The same difficulty would not occur in preaching, since for this, we may suppose, he had sufficiently prepared his thoughts and expressions to make his discourse intelligible on all important points; and if he should, in some parts, fail of being, understood, he could repeat or correct himself, till he should succeed better.
Sir James talked a great deal, and made many civil excuses to me for the liberty he had taken in coming to Churchhill--mixing more frequent laughter with his discourse than the subject required--said many things over and over again, and told Lady Susan three times that he had seen Mrs.