discredit


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Related to discredit: discount

dis·cred·it

 (dĭs-krĕd′ĭt)
tr.v. dis·cred·it·ed, dis·cred·it·ing, dis·cred·its
1. To damage in reputation; disgrace: a report on corruption that discredited the mayor.
2. To cause to be doubted or distrusted: new scientific evidence that discredits earlier theories.
3. To refuse to believe: discredit a story as mere gossip.
n.
1. Loss of respect or damage to one's reputation: an incident that brought discredit on the school.
2. Lack or loss of trust or belief; doubt: evidence that brings the popular notion into discredit.
3. Something that brings disgrace or distrust: He is a discredit to his family.

discredit

(dɪsˈkrɛdɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to damage the reputation of
2. to cause to be disbelieved or distrusted
3. to reject as untrue or of questionable accuracy
n
4. a person, thing, or state of affairs that causes disgrace
5. damage to a reputation
6. lack of belief or confidence

dis•cred•it

(dɪsˈkrɛd ɪt)

v.t.
1. to injure the credit or reputation of; defame.
2. to destroy confidence in the reliability of.
3. to give no credence to: to discredit a witness.
n.
4. loss or lack of belief or confidence; distrust.
5. disrepute.
6. something that damages a good reputation.
[1550–60]

discredit


Past participle: discredited
Gerund: discrediting

Imperative
discredit
discredit
Present
I discredit
you discredit
he/she/it discredits
we discredit
you discredit
they discredit
Preterite
I discredited
you discredited
he/she/it discredited
we discredited
you discredited
they discredited
Present Continuous
I am discrediting
you are discrediting
he/she/it is discrediting
we are discrediting
you are discrediting
they are discrediting
Present Perfect
I have discredited
you have discredited
he/she/it has discredited
we have discredited
you have discredited
they have discredited
Past Continuous
I was discrediting
you were discrediting
he/she/it was discrediting
we were discrediting
you were discrediting
they were discrediting
Past Perfect
I had discredited
you had discredited
he/she/it had discredited
we had discredited
you had discredited
they had discredited
Future
I will discredit
you will discredit
he/she/it will discredit
we will discredit
you will discredit
they will discredit
Future Perfect
I will have discredited
you will have discredited
he/she/it will have discredited
we will have discredited
you will have discredited
they will have discredited
Future Continuous
I will be discrediting
you will be discrediting
he/she/it will be discrediting
we will be discrediting
you will be discrediting
they will be discrediting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been discrediting
you have been discrediting
he/she/it has been discrediting
we have been discrediting
you have been discrediting
they have been discrediting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been discrediting
you will have been discrediting
he/she/it will have been discrediting
we will have been discrediting
you will have been discrediting
they will have been discrediting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been discrediting
you had been discrediting
he/she/it had been discrediting
we had been discrediting
you had been discrediting
they had been discrediting
Conditional
I would discredit
you would discredit
he/she/it would discredit
we would discredit
you would discredit
they would discredit
Past Conditional
I would have discredited
you would have discredited
he/she/it would have discredited
we would have discredited
you would have discredited
they would have discredited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.discredit - the state of being held in low esteem; "your actions will bring discredit to your name"; "because of the scandal the school has fallen into disrepute"
infamy - evil fame or public reputation
dishonor, dishonour - a state of shame or disgrace; "he was resigned to a life of dishonor"
Verb1.discredit - cause to be distrusted or disbelieved; "The paper discredited the politician with its nasty commentary"
brush aside, brush off, discount, dismiss, disregard, ignore, push aside - bar from attention or consideration; "She dismissed his advances"
2.discredit - damage the reputation of; "This newspaper story discredits the politicians"
disparage, belittle, pick at - express a negative opinion of; "She disparaged her student's efforts"
3.discredit - reject as false; refuse to accept
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
doubt - consider unlikely or have doubts about; "I doubt that she will accept his proposal of marriage"
distrust, mistrust, suspect - regard as untrustworthy; regard with suspicion; have no faith or confidence in

discredit

verb
1. disgrace, blame, shame, smear, stain, humiliate, degrade, taint, slur, detract from, disparage, vilify, slander, sully, dishonour, stigmatize, defame, bring into disrepute, bring shame upon He says his accusers are trying to discredit him.
disgrace honour, praise, acclaim, applaud, pay tribute to, commend, laud, big up (slang, chiefly Caribbean)
2. dispute, question, challenge, deny, reject, discount, distrust, mistrust, repudiate, cast doubt on or upon, disbelieve, pooh-pooh They realized there would be problems in discrediting the evidence.
noun
1. disgrace, scandal, shame, disrepute, smear, stigma, censure, slur, ignominy, dishonour, imputation, odium, ill-repute, aspersion His actions have brought discredit on the whole regiment.
disgrace credit, honour, praise, approval, merit, acclaim, acknowledgment, commendation

discredit

verb
1. To damage in reputation:
Idiom: be a reproach to.
2. To cause to be no longer believed or valued:
Informal: shoot down.
Idioms: knock the bottom out of, shoot full of holes.
3. To prove or show to be false:
4. To give no credence to:
noun
2. The refusal or reluctance to believe:
Translations
فُقْدان السُّمْعَهيَرْفُض الثِّقَه بِيُشَوِّهُ سُمْعَة
ostudašpatná reputacezničit důvěruzpůsobit hanbu
miskreditvanære
rossz hírbe kever
draga í efakoma óorîi ávansæmd, smán
daryti gėdądiskredituojantis dalykasdiskredituotigėdingaigėdingas
apšaubītdiskreditēt, celt neslavunegodsneslava
diskreditovať
doğru olmadığını göstermekgüvensizlikitibarını sarsmakitimatsızlıkşerefine leke sürmek

discredit

[dɪsˈkredɪt]
A. N (= dishonour) → descrédito m, deshonor m
it was to the general's discredit thatfue un descrédito para el general que ...
to bring discredit (up)on sth/sbdesacreditar algo/a algn, suponer un descrédito para algo/algn
B. VT
1. (= prove untrue) [+ theory] → rebatir, refutar
that theory is now discreditedesa teoría ya ha sido rebatida or refutada
2. (= cast doubt upon) → poner en duda
all his evidence is thus discreditedpor lo tanto se pone en duda todo su testimonio
3. (= sully reputation of) [+ family] → deshonrar, desacreditar; [+ organization, profession] → desacreditar

discredit

[dɪsˈkrɛdɪt]
vt
(= cast doubt on) [+ theory, report, claim, policy] → mettre en doute
(= cast a slur on) [+ person, organization] → discréditer
ndiscrédit m
It is to his discredit that he did not manage to avert the disaster → Il est discrédité par le fait de n'avoir pas su éviter le désastre.

discredit

vt
(= cast slur/doubt on)diskreditieren
(= disbelieve)keinen Glauben schenken (+dat)
n
no pl (= dishonour, disbelief)Misskredit m; to bring discredit (up)on somebody/somethingjdn/etw in Misskredit bringen
to be a discredit to somebodyeine Schande für jdn sein

discredit

[dɪsˈkrɛdɪt] (frm)
1. ndiscredito
to bring discredit on sb/sth → far cadere qn/qc in discredito
2. vtscreditare

discredit

(disˈkredit) noun
(something that causes) loss of good reputation.
verb
1. to show (a story etc) to be false.
2. to disgrace.
disˈcreditable adjective
bringing discredit or disgrace.
disˈcreditably adverb

discredit

v. desacreditar.
References in classic literature ?
Much and deservedly to my own discredit, therefore, and considerably to the detriment of my official conscience, they continued, during my incumbency, to creep about the wharves, and loiter up and down the Custom-House steps.
I had a great desire to rack the executioner; not because he was a good, painstaking and paingiving official, -- for surely it was not to his discredit that he performed his functions well -- but to pay him back for wantonly cuffing and otherwise dis- tressing that young woman.
Such will try to discredit the shocking tales of slaveholding cruelty which are recorded in this truthful Narrative; but they will labor in vain.
He was afraid he might have dealt with his love affairs in some indecorous fashion, that might tend to the discredit and prejudice of the purity of his lady Dulcinea del Toboso; he would have had him set forth the fidelity and respect he had always observed towards her, spurning queens, empresses, and damsels of all sorts, and keeping in check the impetuosity of his natural impulses.
But this is certain, and an opinion commonly received among theologians, that the action by which he now sustains it is the same with that by which he originally created it; so that even although he had from the beginning given it no other form than that of chaos, provided only he had established certain laws of nature, and had lent it his concurrence to enable it to act as it is wont to do, it may be believed, without discredit to the miracle of creation, that, in this way alone, things purely material might, in course of time, have become such as we observe them at present; and their nature is much more easily conceived when they are beheld coming in this manner gradually into existence, than when they are only considered as produced at once in a finished and perfect state.
But he feels that such conduct brings discredit on the name of Athens: he feels too, that the judge has sworn not to give away justice; and he cannot be guilty of the impiety of asking the judge to break his oath, when he is himself being tried for impiety.
Where a man in any station had given satisfactory evidence of his fitness for it, a new President would be restrained from attempting a change in favor of a person more agreeable to him, by the apprehension that a discountenance of the Senate might frustrate the attempt, and bring some degree of discredit upon himself.
Undoubtedly," said Villefort, moderating the tones of his voice, "a marriage once concerted and then broken off, throws a sort of discredit on a young lady; then again, the old reports, which I was so anxious to put an end to, will instantly gain ground.
She wished to discredit it entirely, repeatedly exclaiming, "This must be false!
But recovering from this, he seemed determined not to discredit my assertion, and grasping his implements, he flourished them about in fearful vicinity to my face, going through an imaginary performance of his art, and every moment bursting into some admiring exclamation at the beauty of his designs.
If every play is to be objected to, you will act nothing, and the preparations will be all so much money thrown away, and I am sure that would be a discredit to us all.
I am sorry to say, to the discredit of Newman's gallantry, that this lady's invitation was not then and there bestowed; he was giving all his attention to the old marquise.