discursive


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dis·cur·sive

 (dĭ-skûr′sĭv)
adj.
1. Covering a wide field of subjects; rambling.
2. Proceeding to a conclusion through reason rather than intuition.

[Medieval Latin discursīvus, from Latin discursus, running about; see discourse.]

dis·cur′sive·ly adv.
dis·cur′sive·ness n.

discursive

(dɪˈskɜːsɪv)
adj
1. passing from one topic to another, usually in an unmethodical way; digressive
2. (Philosophy) philosophy of or relating to knowledge obtained by reason and argument rather than intuition. Compare dianoetic
[C16: from Medieval Latin discursīvus, from Late Latin discursus discourse]
disˈcursively adv
disˈcursiveness n

dis•cur•sive

(dɪˈskɜr sɪv)

adj.
1. passing aimlessly from one subject to another; digressive; rambling.
2. proceeding by reasoning or argument rather than intuition.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin discursīvus. See discourse, -ive]
dis•cur′sive•ly, adv.
dis•cur′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.discursive - proceeding to a conclusion by reason or argument rather than intuition
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
logical - capable of or reflecting the capability for correct and valid reasoning; "a logical mind"
2.discursive - (of e.g. speech and writing) tending to depart from the main point or cover a wide range of subjects; "amusingly digressive with satirical thrusts at women's fashions among other things"; "a rambling discursive book"; "his excursive remarks"; "a rambling speech about this and that"
indirect - extended senses; not direct in manner or language or behavior or action; "making indirect but legitimate inquiries"; "an indirect insult"; "doubtless they had some indirect purpose in mind"; "though his methods are indirect they are not dishonest"; "known as a shady indirect fellow"

discursive

adjective digressive, loose, rambling, roundabout, diffuse, meandering, desultory, long-winded, circuitous, prolix The book is characterized by a reflective, discursive style.

discursive

adjective
Marked by or given to digression:
Translations

discursive

[dɪsˈkɜːsɪv] ADJdivagador, prolijo (Ling, Philos) → discursivo

discursive

[dɪˈskɜːrsɪv] adj [writing, style] → discursif/ive

discursive

adj
styleweitschweifig
(Philos) → diskursiv
References in classic literature ?
I had not got far into it, when I judged from her looks that she was thinking in a discursive way of me, rather than of what I said.
During this discursive address Silas had continued motionless in his previous attitude, leaning his elbows on his knees, and pressing his hands against his head.
So from the root Springs lighter the green stalk, from thence the leaves More aerie, last the bright consummate floure Spirits odorous breathes: flours and thir fruit Mans nourishment, by gradual scale sublim'd To vital Spirits aspire, to animal, To intellectual, give both life and sense, Fansie and understanding, whence the soule Reason receives, and reason is her being, Discursive, or Intuitive; discourse Is oftest yours, the latter most is ours, Differing but in degree, of kind the same.
It is high time that I should pass from these brief and discursive notes about things in Flatland to the central event of this book, my initiation into the mysteries of Space.
It appeared from his discursive answer that she had not much of a name one way or another.
SADLY discursive as I have already been, I must still further entreat the reader's patience, as I am about to string together, without any attempt at order, a few odds and ends of things not hitherto mentioned, but which are either curious in themselves or peculiar to the Typees.
During the meal the Frenchman was in great feather: he was discursive and pompous to every one.
As a rule, her conversation, though pleasing, was discursive and lacked central motive, but one morning she had genuine news to impart.
she, hardly more than a budding woman, but yet with an active conscience and a great mental need, not to be satisfied by a girlish instruction comparable to the nibblings and judgments of a discursive mouse.
With which preface, Mrs Nickleby took her nightcap from between the leaves of a very large prayer-book where it had been folded up small, and proceeded to tie it on: talking away in her usual discursive manner, all the time.
The completed book is a discursive treatise, the various volumes necessarily written from more or less different view-points, on many of the main aspects, general and technical, of all art, literary as well as pictorial.
Hargrave and Annabella, from different motives and in different ways, emulated me, and doubtless both surpassed me, the former in his discursive versatility and eloquence, the latter in boldness and animation at least.