disenchanting


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dis·en·chant

 (dĭs′ĕn-chănt′)
tr.v. dis·en·chant·ed, dis·en·chant·ing, dis·en·chants
To free from illusion or false belief; undeceive.

[Obsolete French desenchanter, from Old French, to break a spell : des-, dis- + enchanter, to enchant; see enchant.]

dis′en·chant′er n.
dis′en·chant′ing·ly adv.
dis′en·chant′ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disenchanting - freeing from illusion or false belief
convincing - causing one to believe the truth of something; "a convincing story"; "a convincing manner"
References in classic literature ?
Toward the end of the week I began to get this large and disenchanting fact through my head: that the mass of the nation had swung their caps and shouted for the republic for about one day, and there an end
When I saw "King Lear" played, nobody was allowed to see a scene shifted; if there was nothing to be done but slide a forest out of the way and expose a temple beyond, one did not see that forest split itself in the middle and go shrieking away, with the accompanying disenchanting spectacle of the hands and heels of the impelling impulse--no, the curtain was always dropped for an instant--one heard not the least movement behind it--but when it went up, the next instant, the forest was gone.
Don't make a mistake, it is disenchanting to hear Peter Ivanovitch dictate, but at the same time there is a fascination about it.