disfavor

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dis·fa·vor

 (dĭs-fā′vər)
n.
1. Unfavorable opinion or regard; disapproval: a method that researchers have come to view with disfavor.
2. The condition of being regarded with disapproval: an idea that has fallen into disfavor.
tr.v. dis·fa·vored, dis·fa·vor·ing, dis·fa·vors
1. To view or treat with dislike or disapproval.
2. To slow down or otherwise reduce the success of (a chemical process or pathway): conditions that disfavor the growth of a pathogen.

dis•fa•vor

(dɪsˈfeɪ vər)

n.
1. unfavorable regard; displeasure; dislike.
2. the state of being regarded unfavorably; disrepute.
v.t.
3. to regard or treat with disfavor.
Also, esp. Brit.,dis•fa′vour.
[1525–35]
dis•fa′vor•er, n.

Disfavor

 

black sheep One who is rejected and scorned as a result of being different from other members of a group; a disreputable character, a bad apple. In a flock of white sheep, a black sheep represents an undesirable deviation from the norm. Some say shepherds dislike the black sheep because of its lesser value; others say because it is an eyesore; still others associate black with badness, evil, and the devil. The label is applied to any person who has flagrantly violated or even slightly deviated from the social norms of a particular group. A black sheep is considered a disgrace and is therefore ostracized from the group. Black sheep have been considered objectionable creatures for at least four centuries:

Till now I thought the proverb did but jest,
Which said a black sheep was a biting beast.
(Thomas Bastard, Chrestoleros, 1598)

foul ball One whose personal philosophy or behavior is unacceptable to the mainstream of society; a nonconformist or eccentric. In baseball, a foul ball is one outside the field of play, which is hit or rolls outside of the designated “fair” area. The transference of this expression to an individual whose principles are outside the realm of established social standards is apparent.

hit list Any list of people in disfavor with someone in power; literally, a list of those scheduled to be murdered, usually by the hit man or hired gun of a crime syndicate. This 20th-century Americanism was originally gangster lingo but is no longer limited to underworld use.

in Dutch In trouble, in disgrace, out of favor, in the doghouse; often in the phrase to get in Dutch. No satisfactory explanation has yet been offered as to why one gets in Dutch as opposed to some other nationality, although this expression may have some connection with the older phrase to talk to [someone] like a Dutch uncle. This American slang term has been in use since at least 1912. See also talk to like a Dutch uncle, REPRIMAND.

in [someone’s] black books Out of favor; in disgrace. Nicholas Amherst, in his Terrae Filius: or The Secret History of the University of Oxford (1721), speaks of the college’s black book, pointing out that no student whose name appeared there could receive a degree.

in the doghouse In disfavor or disgrace. Though most commonly applied to misbehaving husbands, the phrase also refers to general disaffection or rejection:

Several big stars are in studio doghouses because of their political affiliations. (Daily Ardmoreite [Ardmore, Oklahoma], April 19, 1948)

This figurative use is considered American in origin, though in James M. Barrie’s Peter Pan (1904) Mr. Darling literally lived in a doghouse as penance until his children returned from Never Never Land. He was responsible for their departure since he had chained up their nurse-dog, Nana, the night they ran off with Peter Pan.

[one’s] name is mud A discredited or disreputable person; one who is ineffective, not respected, or untrustworthy; one held in low esteem; a pariah. In this expression, mud implies the worst part of something, the dregs, scum. Since many people consider their name (with its attendant reputation and other abstract qualities) their most important possession, they are loath indeed to have it likened to mud.

If tha’ doan’t put ring on finger shortly, my lad, tha’ name will be mud in Mountaindale. (D. Robins, Noble One, 1957)

disfavor


Past participle: disfavored
Gerund: disfavoring

Imperative
disfavor
disfavor
Present
I disfavor
you disfavor
he/she/it disfavors
we disfavor
you disfavor
they disfavor
Preterite
I disfavored
you disfavored
he/she/it disfavored
we disfavored
you disfavored
they disfavored
Present Continuous
I am disfavoring
you are disfavoring
he/she/it is disfavoring
we are disfavoring
you are disfavoring
they are disfavoring
Present Perfect
I have disfavored
you have disfavored
he/she/it has disfavored
we have disfavored
you have disfavored
they have disfavored
Past Continuous
I was disfavoring
you were disfavoring
he/she/it was disfavoring
we were disfavoring
you were disfavoring
they were disfavoring
Past Perfect
I had disfavored
you had disfavored
he/she/it had disfavored
we had disfavored
you had disfavored
they had disfavored
Future
I will disfavor
you will disfavor
he/she/it will disfavor
we will disfavor
you will disfavor
they will disfavor
Future Perfect
I will have disfavored
you will have disfavored
he/she/it will have disfavored
we will have disfavored
you will have disfavored
they will have disfavored
Future Continuous
I will be disfavoring
you will be disfavoring
he/she/it will be disfavoring
we will be disfavoring
you will be disfavoring
they will be disfavoring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been disfavoring
you have been disfavoring
he/she/it has been disfavoring
we have been disfavoring
you have been disfavoring
they have been disfavoring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been disfavoring
you will have been disfavoring
he/she/it will have been disfavoring
we will have been disfavoring
you will have been disfavoring
they will have been disfavoring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been disfavoring
you had been disfavoring
he/she/it had been disfavoring
we had been disfavoring
you had been disfavoring
they had been disfavoring
Conditional
I would disfavor
you would disfavor
he/she/it would disfavor
we would disfavor
you would disfavor
they would disfavor
Past Conditional
I would have disfavored
you would have disfavored
he/she/it would have disfavored
we would have disfavored
you would have disfavored
they would have disfavored
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disfavor - the state of being out of favor; "he is in disfavor with the king"
rejection - the state of being rejected
wilderness - (politics) a state of disfavor; "he led the Democratic party back from the wilderness"
2.disfavor - an inclination to withhold approval from some person or groupdisfavor - an inclination to withhold approval from some person or group
inclination, tendency, disposition - an attitude of mind especially one that favors one alternative over others; "he had an inclination to give up too easily"; "a tendency to be too strict"
doghouse - an idiomatic term for being in disfavor; "in the doghouse"
reprobation - severe disapproval
Verb1.disfavor - put at a disadvantage; hinder, harm; "This rule clearly disadvantages me"
hamper, handicap, hinder - put at a disadvantage; "The brace I have to wear is hindering my movements"
discriminate, single out, separate - treat differently on the basis of sex or race
prejudice - disadvantage by prejudice

disfavor

noun
Unfavorable opinion or judgment:
verb
To have or express an unfavorable opinion of:
Translations

disfavour

(American) disfavor (disˈfeivə) noun
1. the state of being out of favour. He was in disfavour because he had stayed out late.
2. displeasure or disapproval.
References in periodicals archive ?
10) We focus on how such implicit shifting of the burden of proof effectively tips the scale in favor of the defendant, and that this tipping is most consequential in the exact situation where the price discrimination can have the greatest impact on the disfavored purchaser--a market that is highly competitive but for the price discrimination.
The Justice Department and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) have been exploiting a secretive federal anti-fraud initiative to deter banks from doing business with disfavored industries, such as payday lending, a December report from the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform found.
Also heeding risks entailed by any irresponsible and emotional reaction to the Takfeeri murdering of the kidnapped army soldier, the MP strongly disfavored disseminating any provocative statements online in the social media contending that the net result would be to foment further tensions by pushing people towards escalating social and political agitation.
Adler (1931) suggested that parental favoritism might result in psychological and social adjustment problems in the disfavored children.
The Commission was worried that the premium passengers those in first, business or flexible economy classes would be disfavored by the3 airlines' revenue-sharing joint venture on the Frankfurt-New York route.
Only after you find yourself rooting for drug dealers and even drug-enforcement authorities does Jarecki start hammering home his political takeaway: that American drug prohibition is best understood as a war on disfavored ethnic minorities.
Kennedy wrote that the First Amendment keeps the state from singling out "disfavored speech by disfavored speakers.
The recommendations were disfavored by the Rangarajan expert committee, which went into proposals suggested by the NAC.
A 17-year-old boy was sentenced to 11 years in prison Tuesday for stabbing to death his female classmate, whom he liked but felt he was disfavored by, in the Tokyo suburban city of Machida in 2005.
It's a very disfavored defense in California,'' attorney David Houchin said.
With their verbal advantage taken into consideration, girls are found to be disfavored on both MC and CR items, with MC items proving to be more challenging than CR items.
Interlocutory appeals are generally disfavored because they interrupt the main proceeding and distract from the completion of the case.