disfavour

(redirected from disfavours)
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disfavour

(dɪsˈfeɪvə) or

disfavor

n
1. disapproval or dislike
2. the state of being disapproved of or disliked
3. an unkind act
4. a damaging or disadvantageous effect; detriment
vb
(tr) to regard or treat with disapproval or dislike

disfavour


Past participle: disfavoured
Gerund: disfavouring

Imperative
disfavour
disfavour
Present
I disfavour
you disfavour
he/she/it disfavours
we disfavour
you disfavour
they disfavour
Preterite
I disfavoured
you disfavoured
he/she/it disfavoured
we disfavoured
you disfavoured
they disfavoured
Present Continuous
I am disfavouring
you are disfavouring
he/she/it is disfavouring
we are disfavouring
you are disfavouring
they are disfavouring
Present Perfect
I have disfavoured
you have disfavoured
he/she/it has disfavoured
we have disfavoured
you have disfavoured
they have disfavoured
Past Continuous
I was disfavouring
you were disfavouring
he/she/it was disfavouring
we were disfavouring
you were disfavouring
they were disfavouring
Past Perfect
I had disfavoured
you had disfavoured
he/she/it had disfavoured
we had disfavoured
you had disfavoured
they had disfavoured
Future
I will disfavour
you will disfavour
he/she/it will disfavour
we will disfavour
you will disfavour
they will disfavour
Future Perfect
I will have disfavoured
you will have disfavoured
he/she/it will have disfavoured
we will have disfavoured
you will have disfavoured
they will have disfavoured
Future Continuous
I will be disfavouring
you will be disfavouring
he/she/it will be disfavouring
we will be disfavouring
you will be disfavouring
they will be disfavouring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been disfavouring
you have been disfavouring
he/she/it has been disfavouring
we have been disfavouring
you have been disfavouring
they have been disfavouring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been disfavouring
you will have been disfavouring
he/she/it will have been disfavouring
we will have been disfavouring
you will have been disfavouring
they will have been disfavouring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been disfavouring
you had been disfavouring
he/she/it had been disfavouring
we had been disfavouring
you had been disfavouring
they had been disfavouring
Conditional
I would disfavour
you would disfavour
he/she/it would disfavour
we would disfavour
you would disfavour
they would disfavour
Past Conditional
I would have disfavoured
you would have disfavoured
he/she/it would have disfavoured
we would have disfavoured
you would have disfavoured
they would have disfavoured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disfavour - the state of being out of favor; "he is in disfavor with the king"
rejection - the state of being rejected
wilderness - (politics) a state of disfavor; "he led the Democratic party back from the wilderness"
2.disfavour - an inclination to withhold approval from some person or groupdisfavour - an inclination to withhold approval from some person or group
inclination, tendency, disposition - an attitude of mind especially one that favors one alternative over others; "he had an inclination to give up too easily"; "a tendency to be too strict"
doghouse - an idiomatic term for being in disfavor; "in the doghouse"
reprobation - severe disapproval
Verb1.disfavour - put at a disadvantage; hinder, harm; "This rule clearly disadvantages me"
hamper, handicap, hinder - put at a disadvantage; "The brace I have to wear is hindering my movements"
discriminate, single out, separate - treat differently on the basis of sex or race
prejudice - disadvantage by prejudice

disfavour

U.S. disfavor
noun
1. unpopularity, shame, disgrace, discredit, doghouse (informal), bad books (informal), disesteem He fell into disfavour and had to resign.
2. disapproval, dislike, displeasure, disapprobation She eyed his unruly collar-length hair with disfavour.
Translations
اسْتِياء، كُرْهفُقْدان الحُظْوَه
nelibostnepřízeňnesouhlas
misfornøjelseunådeutilfredshed
ónáîóvild, vanòóknun
nemalonė
nelabvēlībanoraidoša izturēšanās
beğenmeyişgözden düşmeonaylamayış

disfavour

disfavor (US) [dɪsˈfeɪvəʳ] N
1. (= disapproval) → desaprobación f
to fall into disfavour [custom, practice] → caer en desuso; [person] → caer en desgracia
to look with disfavour on sthver algo con malos ojos, desaprobar algo
2. (= disservice) to do sb a disfavour; do a disfavour to sbhacer un flaco favor a algn, no hacer ningún favor a algn

disfavour

[dɪsˈfeɪvər] (British) disfavor (US) ndéfaveur f
to view sth with disfavour → voir qch d'un mauvais œil
to fall into disfavour → tomber en disgrâce

disfavour

, (US) disfavor
n
(= displeasure)Ungnade f; (= dislike)Missfallen nt; to fall into/be in disfavour (with)in Ungnade fallen/sein (bei); to look with disfavour (up)on somebody/somethingjdn/etw mit Missfallen betrachten
(= disadvantage) in/to his disfavourzu seinen Ungunsten

disfavour

disfavor (Am) [dɪsˈfeɪvəʳ] n (frm) → disapprovazione f
to fall into disfavour → cadere in disgrazia
to be in disfavour with sb → avere la disapprovazione di qn
to look with disfavour on → disapprovare

disfavour

(American) disfavor (disˈfeivə) noun
1. the state of being out of favour. He was in disfavour because he had stayed out late.
2. displeasure or disapproval.
References in classic literature ?
His master having, through disregard of his counsel, been captured by the Ch`in State, Ch`u Yuan sank into disfavour with his sons, and retired to the hills, where he wrote his famous `Li Sao', of which the following is one of the songs.
The very circumstance of his being her father's choice too, was so much in his disfavour, that had he been deserving her, in every other respect yet THAT of itself ought to have been a sufficient reason in the Eyes of Janetta for rejecting him.
Once a Woman, always a Woman" is a Decree of Nature; and the very Laws of Evolution seem suspended in her disfavour.
His declining to be on cordial terms with the head of his family, has left a very strong impression in his disfavour with me.
He will do now,' says the doctor, washing his hands, and looking at the patient with growing disfavour.
Cottagers who were not directly employed on the land were looked upon with disfavour, and the banishment of some starved the trade of others, who were thus obliged to follow.