disharmonious


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dis·har·mo·ni·ous

 (dĭs′här-mō′nē-əs)
adj.
Lacking in harmony.

dis′har·mo′ni·ous·ly adv.

dis•har•mo•ni•ous

(ˌdɪs hɑrˈmoʊ ni əs)

adj.
discordant.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disharmonious - lacking in harmony
inharmonious, unharmonious - not in harmony

disharmonious

adjective
Characterized by unpleasant discordance of sound:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
She wrote: "Whilst our start was cordially disharmonious, perhaps me and Jeremy Corbyn can take this journey together.
You look disharmonious when I watch you lads play at the moment.
Those children, psychologists and sociologists say that develop disharmonious personality and therefore it is possible that, once matured, to form a generation of adults with social integration problems" (Constantinescu, 2008: 215).
There are ample examples from the Bible (the book of Revelation), church history (the Taiping Rebellion), and contemporary life to show the disharmonious effects of Christianity.
It appears then that, in Soviet animated film in the early 1960s, formalistic montage was only appropriate in the representation of disharmonious American cityscapes.
My focus wavered despite the magnitude of Ruebners poetry when I encountered disharmonious choices.
Elites are seldom in such a disharmonious state as to lend leverage to protesters.
They ruled that the "proposed works, by reason of their scale, design and the materials of construction would be incongruous and disharmonious with its surroundings which would have a detrimental impact upon the visual appearance and setting of the landscape and the listed building" contrary to parts of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF).
Such works are far removed from the difficult, seemingly disharmonious approach in late Beethoven or the darkness visible of Goya's late black paintings.
a social system that provides for solutions for the tensions arising from disharmonious development;
This conceptual generalization was possible because the hysteric, much more than the obsessional or the phobic, exposes the subject's constant strife between the conscious and the unconscious; it lays open the disharmonious character of desire.