disingenuity


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Related to disingenuity: ruly, Resemblant

disingenuity

(ˌdɪsɪndʒɪˈnjuːɪtɪ)
n
1. the quality of being disingenuous
2. an underhand dealing
References in classic literature ?
She was, indeed, a little offended with the former, for the disingenuity which she now discovered.
But this untractableness may be carried too far, and may degenerate into obstinacy, perverseness, or disingenuity.
180) Judge Simon found the agency's treatment of climate change effects unconvincing to the point of disingenuity, noting that confining its analysis to the BiOp time frame (on the ground that there was too much uncertainty after 2018) was inconsistent with the fact that a meaningful recovery analysis required consideration of climate effects well beyond the BiOp period.
Nevertheless, rather than simply allotting the entire blame on the disingenuity of Arab regimes one after the other, there happens to be a consensus ranging from the early thinkers such as Negib Azoury and Michel Aflak to the Gulf Monarchies and authoritarian regimes of today that what needs to be recognized is that the ideological clarity desired by such a sweeping vision is simply not present.
The disingenuity of those hiding behind their supposed fears of the Zika virus to cover up their complete apathy to anything that's not a Grand Slam or a Ryder Cup is boak-inducing.
Cultural decay was on bold display in Skilling, (19) an Enron spin-off rich in warnings about how disingenuity and outright lying increasingly threaten not just corporate governance, but the fundamental trust without which a healthy commercial and civic life cannot exist.
It smacks of disingenuity, however, to denounce D's conduct as contrived ignorance while in the same breath acquitting D of 'dishonesty or moral obliquity' in his or her dealings with P.
Its quirkiness and Tistou's disingenuity reminded me more than once of Voltaire's Candide--a satire, very much in the French tradition.
We might also see disingenuity in the way the show obviously foregrounds the pleasure and fun of identity-switching (particularly in promotional materials) while arguing the opposite in its narrative.
There is something extremely provocative lurking within Levinson's critique of the rights/remedy split, his concern for the opacity and disingenuity of substantive adjudication, and his turn toward countersequentialism as a way of exposing the normative underpinnings of a court's decisions.
I return to this letter, and its more fundamental disingenuity, at the end of this article in n.