disinherited


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dis·in·her·it

 (dĭs′ĭn-hĕr′ĭt)
tr.v. dis·in·her·it·ed, dis·in·her·it·ing, dis·in·her·its
1. To exclude from inheritance or the right to inherit.
2. To deprive of a natural or established right or privilege.

dis′in·her′i·tance n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disinherited - deprived of your rightful heritage
unloved - not loved
References in classic literature ?
His suit of armour was formed of steel, richly inlaid with gold, and the device on his shield was a young oak-tree pulled up by the roots, with the Spanish word Desdichado, signifying Disinherited.
I am fitter to meet death than thou art,'' answered the Disinherited Knight; for by this name the stranger had recorded himself in the books of the tourney.
Gramercy for thy courtesy,'' replied the Disinherited Knight, ``and to requite it, I advise thee to take a fresh horse and a new lance, for by my honour you will need both.
Few augured the possibility that the encounter could terminate well for the Disinherited Knight, yet his courage and gallantry secured the general good wishes of the spectators.
In this second encounter, the Templar aimed at the centre of his antagonist's shield, and struck it so fair and forcibly, that his spear went to shivers, and the Disinherited Knight reeled in his saddle.
The Disinherited Knight sprung from his steed, and also unsheathed his sword.
Younger brothers are commonly fortunate, but seldom or never where the elder are disinherited.
Any one of these partners would have disinherited his son on the question of rebuilding Tellson's.
It was not so much the conviction that she was disinherited that caused her grief, but her total inability to account for the feelings which had provoked her grandfather to such an act.
monseigneur, king of a people very humble, much disinherited; humble because they have no force save when creeping; disinherited, because never, almost never in this world, do my people reap the harvest they sow, nor eat the fruit they cultivate.
Edward, my father had a son, who being a fool like you, and, like you, entertaining low and disobedient sentiments, he disinherited and cursed one morning after breakfast.
On the Tuesday I sent in the altered settlement, which practically disinherited the very persons whom Miss Fairlie's own lips had informed me she was most anxious to benefit.