disinhibitory

disinhibitory

(ˌdɪsɪnˈhɪbɪtərɪ)
adj
(Psychology) (esp of a drug) causing temporary loss of inhibition
References in periodicals archive ?
The drug has been most strongly associated with the 'chem sex' phenomena, due to its disinhibitory effect but also commonly used as a recreational drug in clubbing.
Diverse pathways to deficient self-regulation: Implications for disinhibitory psychopathology in children.
2013) and could be explained with the disinhibitory effect of alcohol and drugs on sexual responsiveness (Justus, Finn, & Steinmetz, 2000; MacDonald, Zanna, & Fong, 1998; Wilson & Niaura, 1984).
1973) 'Process governing disinhibitory effects through symbolic modelling', Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 82, 1-9.
Recent studies draw attention to the use of benzodiazepines in cases with manifested suicide risk, on the one hand, due to the "arming" of these persons with a treacherous self-destructive "weapon" and, on the other hand, due to the disinhibitory effect upon the behavior.
Second, the early iterations of the Confluence Model were premised on the theoretical importance of considering the interaction between motivational, disinhibitory, and opportunity factors that increase sexual assault risk (Malamuth, 1986).
Personality and disinhibitory psychopathology: Alcoholism and antisocial personality.
A] receptor genes influence neural excitability and an imbalance in excitation-inhibition, manifesting as increased beta activity (hyperexcitability or CNS disinhibition) in alcoholics and HR offspring, which in turn may be involved in the predisposition to develop AUD and related disinhibitory disorders.
Decision Making in Alcohol Dependence: Insensitivity to Future Consequences and Comorbid Disinhibitory Psychopathology.
Or it may be due to the disinhibitory effects of alcohol and cannabis providing opportunities for sexual behaviour," said Ramrakha.
Since disinhibitory cues are generally stronger and more immediate than inhibitory cues, disinhibited social behavior is likely to occur.