disinterested


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dis·in·ter·est·ed

 (dĭs-ĭn′trĭ-stĭd, -ĭn′tə-rĕs′tĭd)
adj.
1. Free of bias and self-interest; impartial: "disinterested scientific opinion on fluorides in the water supply" (Ellen R. Shell).
2.
a. Not interested; indifferent: "supremely disinterested in all efforts to find a peaceful solution" (C.L. Sulzberger).
b. Having lost interest.

dis·in′ter·est·ed·ly adv.
Usage Note: In traditional usage, disinterested can only mean "having no stake in an outcome," as in Since the judge stands to profit from the sale of the company, she cannot be considered a disinterested party in the dispute. This usage was acceptable to 98 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2013 survey. But despite critical disapproval, disinterested has come to be widely used to mean "uninterested" or "having lost interest," as in Since she discovered skiing, she's become disinterested in ice skating. The "not interested" meaning is actually the oldest sense of the word, going back to the 1600s. Despite its pedigree, this usage began to be considered an error in the 1900s. In five surveys spanning almost fifty years, the Usage Panel has consistently disapproved of sentences that use disinterested to mean "uninterested." In our 2013 survey, for example, 86 percent of the Usage Panel found the sentence It is difficult to imagine an approach better designed to prevent disinterested students from developing any intellectual maturity to be unacceptable. This figure is essentially unchanged from the 88 percent of the Panel that disapproved of the same sentence in 2001.

disinterested

(dɪsˈɪntrɪstɪd; -tərɪs-)
adj
1. free from bias or partiality; objective
2. not interested
disˈinterestedly adv
disˈinterestedness n
Usage: Many people consider that the use of disinterested to mean not interested is incorrect and that uninterested should be used

dis•in•ter•est•ed

(dɪsˈɪn təˌrɛs tɪd, -trɪ stɪd)

adj.
1. unbiased by personal interest or advantage; not influenced by selfish motives.
2. not interested; indifferent.
[1605–15]
dis•in′ter•est`ed•ly, adv.
dis•in′ter•est`ed•ness, n.
syn: See fair1.
usage: disinterested was orig. used to mean “not interested, indifferent”; uninterested in its earliest use meant “impartial.” By various developmental twists, disinterested is now used in both senses; uninterested, mainly in the sense “not interested, indifferent.” Many object to the use of disinterested to mean “not interested” and continue to reserve the word strictly for the sense “impartial”: A disinterested observer is the best judge of behavior.

disinterested

uninterested
1. 'disinterested'

You use disinterested to describe someone who is not involved in a situation and can therefore make fair decisions or judgements about it.

I'm a disinterested observer.

Some people also use disinterested to say that someone is not interested in something or someone.

Her mother had always been disinterested in her.
2. 'uninterested'

However, this use is often regarded as incorrect. Instead of 'disinterested', it is better to say uninterested.

Lionel was uninterested in the house.
Etta appeared totally uninterested.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disinterested - unaffected by self-interest
impartial - showing lack of favoritism; "the cold neutrality of an impartial judge"

disinterested

adjective
1. impartial, objective, neutral, detached, equitable, impersonal, unbiased, even-handed, unselfish, uninvolved, unprejudiced, free from self-interest Scientists are expected to be impartial and disinterested.
impartial involved, prejudiced, biased, partial, selfish
2. indifferent, apathetic, uninterested We had become jaded, disinterested and disillusioned.
Usage: Disinterested is now so commonly used to mean `not interested' that to avoid ambiguity it is often advisable to replace it by a synonym when the meaning intended is `impartial, unbiased'. In the Bank of English about 10% of the examples of the word occur followed by in, and overall about a third of examples are of this usage.

disinterested

adjective
2. Feeling or showing no strong emotional involvement:
3. Lacking interest in one's surroundings or worldly affairs:
Translations
غَيْر مُتَحَيِّز، نَزيه
nestrannýnezaujatý
uvildig
hlutlaus
nešališkasnesuinteresuotas
neieinteresēts
nepristranski
bîtaraftarafsız

disinterested

[dɪsˈɪntrɪstɪd] ADJ
1. (= impartial) → desinteresado, imparcial
2. (= uninterested) → indiferente

disinterested

[dɪsˈɪntrəstɪd dɪsˈɪntrɪstɪd] adj (= impartial) [person] → désintéressé(e); [observer] → impartial(e); [advice] → désintéressé(e)

disinterested

adj
(= impartial)unvoreingenommen, unparteiisch
(= uninterested)desinteressiert

disinterested

[dɪsˈɪntrɪstɪd] adj (impartial) → disinteressato/a; (strictly incorrect, uninterested) → non interessato/a, indifferente

disinterested

(disˈintristid) adjective
not influenced by private feelings or selfish motives; impartial. It would be best if we let a disinterested party decide.
References in classic literature ?
It is--we say it without censure, nor in diminution of the claim which it indefeasibly possesses on beings of another mould--it is always selfish in its essence; and we must give it leave to be so, and heap up our heroic and disinterested love upon it so much the more, without a recompense.
The broadest and most prevalent error requires the most disinterested virtue to sustain it.
He came back presently and said his principal was charmed with the idea of brickbats at three-quarters of a mile, but must decline on account of the danger to disinterested parties passing between them.
Weston, smiling, "you give him credit for more simple, disinterested benevolence in this instance than I do; for while Miss Bates was speaking, a suspicion darted into my head, and I have never been able to get it out again.
Of Edward, or at least of some of his concerns, she now received intelligence from Colonel Brandon, who had been into Dorsetshire lately; and who, treating her at once as the disinterested friend of Mr.
If you think so, you must have a strange opinion of me; you must regard me as a plotting profligate--a base and low rake who has been simulating disinterested love in order to draw you into a snare deliberately laid, and strip you of honour and rob you of self- respect.
Clare, with the icy composure of a disinterested friend.
Well, I am the most disinterested among you, after all,' said the first speaker,' for I never wear black gloves, and I never eat lunch.
I am sure when I think of the fellow now, my blood rises against him with the disinterested indignation I should feel if I could have known all about him without having ever been in his power; but it rises hotly, because I know him to have been an incapable brute, who had no more right to be possessed of the great trust he held, than to be Lord High Admiral, or Commander-in-Chief - in either of which capacities it is probable that he would have done infinitely less mischief.
But he really is disinterested, and above small jealousy and spite, I have heard?
Wylie had learnt by rote that the whole duty of a lady is to be graceful, charitable, helpful, modest, and disinterested whilst awaiting passively whatever lot these virtues may induce.
If industry, frugality, and disinterested integrity were alike the virtues of all, there would, apparently, be more of the social spirit, in making all property a common stock, and giving to each individual a proportional title to the wealth of the whole.

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