disjunctively


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Related to disjunctively: disjunctive conjunction

dis·junc·tive

 (dĭs-jŭngk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Serving to separate or divide.
2. Grammar Serving to establish a relationship of contrast or opposition. The conjunction but in the phrase poor but comfortable is disjunctive.
3. Logic
a. Of a proposition that presents two or more alternative terms.
b. Of a syllogism that contains a disjunction as one premise.
n. Grammar
A disjunctive conjunction.

dis·junc′tive·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Western ways of understanding the heritage of Early Friends can be disjunctively alien to African cultural settings.
2008) ("Generally, courts presume that "or" is used in a statute disjunctively unless there is clear legislative intent to the contrary.
287) Because the FCRA liability provision alternatively and disjunctively provides that a plaintiff may recover "any actual damages .
These "data bodies," to borrow Borzutzky's term from In the Murmurs of the Rotten Carcass Economy (65), are presented in the disjunctively linear fashion of Ron Silliman's Chinese Notebook:
in Bell operates disjunctively, such that "absent an expressed
Samples from Texas utilized in this study form part of an unusual distribution pattern in which arrays of a parthenogenetic specics are disjunctively represented in Arizona (Persons & Wright 1999) and Utah (Oliver & Wright 2007) from inferred human introductions, and in New Mexico (Dessauer et al.
Watching the minor engage in intercourse with another adult constitutes sexual abuse in numerous sections separated disjunctively.
2002) ("[C]ourts presume that 'or' is used in a statute disjunctively unless there is a clear legislative intent to the contrary.
By placing Joe Keller in a moral spectrum in which only a finite sense of dramatic progression is allowed, Miller keeps the flow of time in a linear continuum (rather than a circular or spiral one or a disjunctively polyphonic multi-directionality) where Keller's death is allegorized in an absolute and irreversible sense of the history's ending.
v], the set S' disjunctively dominates v and therefore contains at least two vertices in [N.
Applied disjunctively, these principles can be used to define a wider range of acceptable radical constructivist theories.
Since S' contains no vertex in [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], the set S' disjunctively dominates v and therefore contains at least two vertices in [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].