dislikes


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dis·like

 (dĭs-līk′)
tr.v. dis·liked, dis·lik·ing, dis·likes
To regard with distaste or aversion.
n.
An attitude or a feeling of distaste or aversion.

dis·lik′a·ble, dis·like′a·ble adj.

dislikes

(ˈdɪsˌlaɪks)
pl n
the things that one does not like
References in classic literature ?
She has been unkind to you, no doubt; because you see, she dislikes your cast of character, as Miss Scatcherd does mine; but how minutely you remember all she has done and said to you
You know that old Prince Nicholas much dislikes his son's marrying.
In former days my rascally colleagues used to tell me that I was unfit even to be seen; in fact, they so disliked me that at length I began to dislike myself, for, being frequently told that I was stupid, I began to believe that I really was so.
I think she took a dislike to me at the thought of my being her father: I could see a change in her manner after that.
It is one of the defects of my character that I cannot altogether dislike anyone who makes me laugh.
The doctor remonstrated to him privately concerning this behaviour, but could obtain no other satisfaction than the following plain declaration: "If you dislike anything in my brother's house, sir, you know you are at liberty to quit it.
Honest and hearty was Charles's dislike, and the past spread itself out very clearly before him; hatred is a skilful compositor.
Besides, how could I dislike any one that promised to make you happy, my dear thing
If you do not dislike it, come to me and we will drink it together.
Women especially, of course, have been taught to dislike them, because it has been rumoured that his views are unfriendly to themselves.
But like or dislike "the people" as something apart he could not, not only because he lived with "the people," and all his interests were bound up with theirs, but also because he regarded himself as a part of "the people," did not see any special qualities or failings distinguishing himself and "the people," and could not contrast himself with them.
Casaubon was out of the question, not merely because he declined duty of this sort, but because Featherstone had an especial dislike to him as the rector of his own parish, who had a lien on the land in the shape of tithe, also as the deliverer of morning sermons, which the old man, being in his pew and not at all sleepy, had been obliged to sit through with an inward snarl.