disparaging


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Related to disparaging: eulogistic

dis·par·age

 (dĭ-spăr′ĭj)
tr.v. dis·par·aged, dis·par·ag·ing, dis·par·ag·es
1. To speak of in a slighting or disrespectful way.
2. To reduce in esteem or rank.

[Middle English disparagen, to degrade, from Old French desparager : des-, dis- + parage, high birth (from per, peer; see peer2).]

dis·par′age·ment n.
dis·par′ag·er n.
dis·par′ag·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: disparage, denigrate, belittle, depreciate
These verbs mean to minimize the value or importance of someone or something. Disparage implies a critical or dismissive attitude often accompanied by disrespect: "Leaders who wouldn't be caught dead making religious or ethnic slurs don't hesitate to disparage the 'godless' among us" (Daniel C. Dennett).
Denigrate often adds a note of contempt: "elitist music critics who denigrated jazz by portraying it as inferior to the classical tradition" (Tyler Stovall).
Belittle means to reduce someone or something to a lowly status, often in an arrogant or hurtful manner: "those who would mock and belittle others simply on the basis of their physical appearance" (Tyler Dilts).
Depreciate implies the assignment of a low estimation of value or worth, though the judgment it expresses is generally less disdainful than in the previous terms: "[19th-century American] literature was still mainly subservient to English models and depreciated as secondhand and second rate" (Chronology of American Literature).

dis•par•ag•ing

(dɪˈspær ɪ dʒɪŋ)

adj.
tending to belittle or discredit.
[1635–45; disparage + -ing2]
dis•par′ag•ing•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disparaging - expressive of low opinion; "derogatory comments"; "disparaging remarks about the new house"
uncomplimentary - tending to (or intended to) detract or disparage

disparaging

disparaging

adjective
Translations

disparaging

[dɪsˈpærɪdʒɪŋ] ADJ [remark] → despectivo
to be disparaging about sth/sbmenospreciar algo/a algn

disparaging

[dɪˈspærɪdʒɪŋ] adj [remarks, comments] → désobligeant(e)
to be disparaging about sb → être désobligeant(e) envers qn, faire des remarques désobligeantes sur qn
to be disparaging about sth → faire des remarques désobligeantes sur qch

disparaging

adj, disparagingly

disparaging

[dɪsˈpærɪdʒɪŋ] adj (comment, remark) → denigratorio/a
to be disparaging about sb/sth → denigrare qn/qc
References in classic literature ?
Don't tell me so--lest I should say something disparaging to your judgment.
If the anonymous letter falls by any accident into her hands, she will find disparaging allusions in it to myself, purposely introduced to suggest that the writer must be one of the persons whom I addressed while conducting her inquiries.
He held the letter out inquiringly; and Monseigneur looked at it, in the person of this plotting and indignant refugee; and Monseigneur looked at it in the person of that plotting and indignant refugee; and This, That, and The Other, all had something disparaging to say, in French or in English, concerning the Marquis who was not to be found.
With what a demure assumption of being immensely older and wiser than I, the fairy little woman said I was 'a silly boy'; and then laughed so charmingly that I forgot the pain of being called by that disparaging name, in the pleasure of looking at her.
I dare say it is something disparaging which you are going to say.
This is the kind of disparaging remark that would be made about me, and I could not complain, for I should myself be scandalised at seeing any other girl do the like, and go about with men in spite of everybody, while her father and mother were still alive, and without having been married in the face of all the world.
M'Dougal, of whose fidelity he had received very disparaging accounts from Captain Thorn.
That without any affectation of disparaging such professional distinction as I may have attained (which our friend Mr.
It is not meet that I should make too disparaging comparisons between humdrum travel on a railway and that royal summer flight across a continent in a stagecoach.
Irene in her usual interfering way objected to this bauble and dropped disparaging remarks about wrecked islands which were little to her credit.
To-day for the first time he regarded his toilet with critical and disparaging eyes.
He turns aside to ring a hand-bell on the table as he speaks; and notices in the guide's face plain signs that the man has taken offense at my disparaging allusion to him.