disparate


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dis·pa·rate

 (dĭs′pər-ĭt, dĭ-spăr′ĭt)
adj.
1. Fundamentally distinct or different in kind; entirely dissimilar: "This mixture of apparently disparate materials—scandal and spiritualism, current events and eternal recurrences—is not promising on the face of it" (Garry Wills).
2. Containing or composed of dissimilar or opposing elements: a disparate group of people who represented a cross section of the city.

[Latin disparātus, past participle of disparāre, to separate : dis-, apart; see dis- + parāre, to prepare; see perə- in Indo-European roots.]

dis′pa·rate·ly adv.
dis′pa·rate·ness n.

disparate

(ˈdɪspərɪt)
adj
utterly different or distinct in kind
n
(plural) unlike things or people
[C16: from Latin disparāre to divide, from dis-1 + parāre to prepare; also influenced by Latin dispar unequal]
ˈdisparately adv
ˈdisparateness n

dis•pa•rate

(ˈdɪs pər ɪt, dɪˈspær-)

adj.
distinct in kind; dissimilar.
[1580–90; < Latin disparātus, past participle of disparāre to divide, make different]
dis′pa•rate•ly, adv.
dis′pa•rate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disparate - fundamentally different or distinct in quality or kind; "such disparate attractions as grand opera and game fishing"; "disparate ideas"
different - unlike in nature or quality or form or degree; "took different approaches to the problem"; "came to a different conclusion"; "different parts of the country"; "on different sides of the issue"; "this meeting was different from the earlier one"
2.disparate - including markedly dissimilar elements; "a disparate aggregate of creeds and songs and prayers"
heterogeneous, heterogenous - consisting of elements that are not of the same kind or nature; "the population of the United States is vast and heterogeneous"

disparate

adjective different, contrasting, unlike, contrary, distinct, diverse, at odds, dissimilar, discordant, at variance, discrepant Scientists are trying to pull together disparate ideas.

disparate

adjective
Not like another in nature, quality, amount, or form:
Translations

disparate

[ˈdɪspərɪt] ADJdispar

disparate

[ˈdɪspərət] adj
(differing from each other) [interests, ideas] → divers(e); [parts, countries, characters] → différent(e); [elements, colours] → disparate
(= diverse) [group, collection] → hétérogène

disparate

adjungleich, disparat (geh)

disparate

[ˈdɪspərɪt] adj (frm) → disparato/a
References in classic literature ?
Yet such a leveller of emotions and an adjuster of disparate dispositions is Time that when they rounded their fourth year, Martin viewed his life, with a few reservations, as fairly satisfactory.
I do not mean to say that relatives may not be disparate, or that the science of health is healthy, or of disease necessarily diseased, or that the sciences of good and evil are therefore good and evil; but only that, when the term science is no longer used absolutely, but has a qualified object which in this case is the nature of health and disease, it becomes defined, and is hence called not merely science, but the science of medicine.
In fact, the government's own rules for making credit available through [the Federal Housing Administration], the Department of Veterans Affairs and other federal housing programs, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's new ability-to-repay rule, can result in a statistically disparate impact on minority families.
While the Court's decision does try to limit the indiscriminate use of disparate impact analysis, those who abuse it to reshape education policy will interpret the ruling as a green light to carry on.
Supreme Court ruled on June 25, 2015 that the disparate impact housing theory was valid under the Fair Housing Act.
The EPA's Title VI rule, issued this spring without consulting state or local governments, applies a disparate impact standard to all permits issued by state and local agencies that receive federal funding.
In this case, African-American firefighters challenged a no-beard rule as discriminatory under Title VII because it had a disparate impact on them due to a higher incidence of a physical condition among African-American men that restricts their ability to shave.
These alternatives -- such as preparation of a statistical summary or the production of the information either in camera or subject to a protective order -- would satisfy the court's need for information necessary to adjudicate the disparate treatment claim without identifying particular taxpayers.
However, Congress only allowed these additional damages for intentional disparate treatment discrimination, which is employment discrimination against any individual based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin.
An obstacle to this task has traditionally been the disparate formats and proprietary terminology used by systems built by different vendors.
Reaction to the Supreme Court's decision Thursday on disparate impact varied widely and often reflected the experiences of the speaker.
3, the Department of Housing and Urban Development's (HUD's) disparate impact rule under the Fair Housing Act (FHA) took a serious blow from a federal court.