disparate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

dis·pa·rate

 (dĭs′pər-ĭt, dĭ-spăr′ĭt)
adj.
1. Fundamentally distinct or different in kind; entirely dissimilar: "This mixture of apparently disparate materials—scandal and spiritualism, current events and eternal recurrences—is not promising on the face of it" (Garry Wills).
2. Containing or composed of dissimilar or opposing elements: a disparate group of people who represented a cross section of the city.

[Latin disparātus, past participle of disparāre, to separate : dis-, apart; see dis- + parāre, to prepare; see perə- in Indo-European roots.]

dis′pa·rate·ly adv.
dis′pa·rate·ness n.

disparate

(ˈdɪspərɪt)
adj
utterly different or distinct in kind
n
(plural) unlike things or people
[C16: from Latin disparāre to divide, from dis-1 + parāre to prepare; also influenced by Latin dispar unequal]
ˈdisparately adv
ˈdisparateness n

dis•pa•rate

(ˈdɪs pər ɪt, dɪˈspær-)

adj.
distinct in kind; dissimilar.
[1580–90; < Latin disparātus, past participle of disparāre to divide, make different]
dis′pa•rate•ly, adv.
dis′pa•rate•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disparate - fundamentally different or distinct in quality or kind; "such disparate attractions as grand opera and game fishing"; "disparate ideas"
different - unlike in nature or quality or form or degree; "took different approaches to the problem"; "came to a different conclusion"; "different parts of the country"; "on different sides of the issue"; "this meeting was different from the earlier one"
2.disparate - including markedly dissimilar elements; "a disparate aggregate of creeds and songs and prayers"
heterogeneous, heterogenous - consisting of elements that are not of the same kind or nature; "the population of the United States is vast and heterogeneous"

disparate

adjective different, contrasting, unlike, contrary, distinct, diverse, at odds, dissimilar, discordant, at variance, discrepant Scientists are trying to pull together disparate ideas.

disparate

adjective
Not like another in nature, quality, amount, or form:
Translations

disparate

[ˈdɪspərɪt] ADJdispar

disparate

[ˈdɪspərət] adj
(differing from each other) [interests, ideas] → divers(e); [parts, countries, characters] → différent(e); [elements, colours] → disparate
(= diverse) [group, collection] → hétérogène

disparate

adjungleich, disparat (geh)

disparate

[ˈdɪspərɪt] adj (frm) → disparato/a
References in classic literature ?
I do not mean to say that relatives may not be disparate, or that the science of health is healthy, or of disease necessarily diseased, or that the sciences of good and evil are therefore good and evil; but only that, when the term science is no longer used absolutely, but has a qualified object which in this case is the nature of health and disease, it becomes defined, and is hence called not merely science, but the science of medicine.
Yet such a leveller of emotions and an adjuster of disparate dispositions is Time that when they rounded their fourth year, Martin viewed his life, with a few reservations, as fairly satisfactory.
Statistical evidence is crucial throughout disparate impact's three-stage analysis: during (1) the plaintiff's prima facie demonstration of a policy's disparate impact; (2) the defendant's job-related business necessity defense of the discriminatory policy; and (3) the plaintiff's demonstration of an alternative policy without the same discriminatory impact.
Inclusive Communities Project, (4) The Court held that the Fair Housing Act ("FHA") recognizes disparate impact claims and that the Texas Department of Housing's distribution of FHA tax credits was done in a way that led to unintentional discrimination.
Supreme Court has finally settled the issue of disparate impact better buckle up for a bumpy aftermath.
District officials were advised that they risk legal action if school disciplinary policies have "a disparate impact, i.
Supreme Court ruled on June 25, 2015 that the disparate impact housing theory was valid under the Fair Housing Act.
Supreme Court decided to uphold disparate impact liability under the Fair Housing Act, a legal theory that prohibits neutrally-applied practices with a disproportionate impact on minority groups protected by the law, even without proving an intent to discriminate.
The majority opinion made clear that a disparate-impact case cannot rely on statistics alone and that the accuser must also cite the specific policy that causes the disparate result.
Lawyers and compliance consultants familiar with the Supreme Court's ruling on disparate impact advised credit unions to examine their lending policies in light of the ruling, but existing regulations will not change.
When the Supreme Court agreed to hear the case --which involves the viability of disparate impact claims under the U.
Rosenfeld not only used the disparate treatment theory in her suit against the school, but also the "disparate impact" theory.