disparity


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Related to disparity: desperateness, Health disparity

dis·par·i·ty

 (dĭ-spăr′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. dis·par·i·ties
1. The condition or fact of being unequal, as in age, rank, or degree; difference: "narrow the economic disparities among regions and industries" (Courtenay Slater).
2. Unlikeness; incongruity.

[French disparité, from Old French desparite, from Late Latin disparitās : Latin dis-, dis- + Late Latin paritās, equality; see parity1.]

disparity

(dɪˈspærɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. inequality or difference, as in age, rank, wages, etc
2. dissimilarity
Usage: See at discrepancy

dis•par•i•ty

(dɪˈspær ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
lack of similarity or equality; difference.
[1545–55; < Middle French desparite < Late Latin disparitās]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disparity - inequality or difference in some respect
inequality - lack of equality; "the growing inequality between rich and poor"
far cry - a disappointing disparity; "it was a far cry from what he had expected"
gap, spread - a conspicuous disparity or difference as between two figures; "gap between income and outgo"; "the spread between lending and borrowing costs"
disconnect, disconnection, gulf - an unbridgeable disparity (as from a failure of understanding); "he felt a gulf between himself and his former friends"; "there is a vast disconnect between public opinion and federal policy"
disproportion - lack of proportion; imbalance among the parts of something

disparity

disparity

noun
1. The condition or fact of being unequal, as in age, rank, or degree:
3. A marked lack of correspondence or agreement:
Translations

disparity

[dɪsˈpærɪtɪ] N (= inequality, dissimilarity) → disparidad f

disparity

[dɪˈspærɪti] ndisparité f
disparities in sth [+ wealth, income, age, living standards] → disparité de qch
disparity between sth and sth → disparité entre qch et qch

disparity

nUngleichheit f, → Disparität f (geh)

disparity

[dɪsˈpærɪtɪ] ndisparità f inv
References in classic literature ?
There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose.
Denisov had two hundred, and Dolokhov might have as many more, but the disparity of numbers did not deter Denisov.
I confess that I do think there is a disparity, too great a disparity, and in a point no less essential than mind.
As great a disparity prevails between the States of Georgia and Delaware or Rhode Island.
Rather, as there was something abnormal and misbegotten in the very essence of the creature that now faced me--something seizing, surprising and revolting-- this fresh disparity seemed but to fit in with and to reinforce it; so that to my interest in the man's nature and character, there was added a curiosity as to his origin, his life, his fortune and status in the world.
Could men or plants but once elevate their thoughts to the vast scale of creation, it would teach them their own insignificance so plainly, would so unerringly make manifest the futility of complaints, and the immense disparity between time and eternity, as to render the useful lesson of contentment as inevitable as it is important.
is there not a wide disparity between the lot of me and the lot of thee, my poor brother, my poor sister?
The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr.
I might have seen there was too great a disparity between the ages of the parties to make it likely that they were man and wife.
When I consider the slight disparity of condition among the islanders--the very limited and inconsiderable prerogatives of the king and chiefs--and the loose and indefinite functions of the priesthood, most of whom were hardly to be distinguished from the rest of their countrymen, I am wholly at a loss where to look for the authority which regulates this potent institution.
It was not that I was annoyed at her avidity but I was really struck with the disparity between such a treasure and such scanty means of guarding it.
With no great disparity between them in point of years, they were, in every other respect, as unlike and far removed from each other as two men could well be.