dispensatory


Also found in: Medical.

dis·pen·sa·to·ry

 (dĭ-spĕn′sə-tôr′ē)
n. pl. dis·pen·sa·to·ries
A book in which the contents, preparation, and uses of medicines are described; a pharmacopoeia.

dispensatory

(dɪˈspɛnsətərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -ries
(Pharmacology) a book listing the composition, preparation, and application of various drugs
adj
of or involving dispensation

dis•pen•sa•to•ry

(dɪˈspɛn səˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

n., pl. -ries.
formulary (def. 3).
[1560–70; < Medieval Latin]
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
She tinctured all his thoughts; she was the compound extract of all that was chemically pure and officinal--the dispensatory contained nothing equal to her.
Sahl's Dispensatory in the Recension of the 'Adudi Hospital
Irrespective of the reasons for why subterranean organs, seeds and exudates became partly obsolete such drugs once formed an important but nowadays neglected part of the Euro-Mediterranean dispensatory.
Even 'traditional'- or 'philosophically'-based texts (such as King's Dispensatory or the British Herbal Pharmacopeia in herbal medicine) categorise treatments by symptoms, not by patients.
See excerpt from The Ladies Dispensatory in Jean Miller, Francie Owens, Rachel Doggett, eds.
Thomson's Dispensatory of 1818, where, under the head "sulphuric ether," he will find it stated that injurious effects had, even then, ensued from the inhalation of its vapour (13).
Technically, this was a dispensatory or list of approved drugs--not a compendium; in 1998 USP sold it to The Thompson Company.
59) George Wood, The Dispensatory of the United States of America (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1858), p.
It is recorded in the United States pharmocopeia and the National Formulary as having been used as a carminative, an aromatic and a stimulant, and in King's American Dispensatory as beneficial for weight loss and cold hands and feet.
As early as 1866 this medicine was reported to be one that "neutralizes the sexual appetite" (Bartholow 188), and by 1905 The National Standard Dispensatory noted that bromide "is also of value in cases of sexual excitement or nymphomania" (Hare et al.
The challenge facing them is to maintain the current level of flexibility while excluding certain restrictions by means of dispensatory measures to account for the specific management requirements (see separate article).
The title page describes the contents as "A description of a variety of herbs and roots, many of which are not explained in any other book, and their medical virtues have hitherto been unknown to the whites; to which is added a short dispensatory.