dispersal prison

dispersal prison

n
(Social Welfare) a prison organized and equipped to accommodate a proportion of the most dangerous and highest security risk prisoners
References in periodicals archive ?
Frankland is a dispersal prison - with many inmates moved between it and others throughout their sentences - but those released directly from Frankland get good resettlement support, according to the report.
She said the six held in London were taken to HMP Long Lartin, a category B dispersal prison, in Evesham, Worcestershire.
Prison Weekly's cameras are the first ever to be allowed into a dispersal prison segregation unit.
Segregation units in dispersal prisons deal with the most disruptive, dangerous and violent prisoners in the system," according to Trevor Williams, Governor at HMP White- moor.
Wakefield Prison, built as a house of correction in 1594, was designated a dispersal prison in 1966 and is now a 'lifer main centre', with the focus on serious sex offenders.
These were selected to be representative of the prison system in England and Wales as a whole, so one was a training prison, another a dispersal prison and so forth.
At least, this was the case in the two dispersal prisons in which, the fieldwork took place, which, given the significant level of Category `A' prisoners in those institutions--by classification at least those with the least to lose by creating disorder--would seem to be potential flashpoints for trouble.
Only five of the 26 inmates in local prisons had made use of the Board, 19 out of 66 men in training prisons, and 12 out of 80 men in dispersal prisons.
But worse is to follow, since some of the academics most closely involved in this experiment now believe that the Central Review Committee placed too much emphasis on special units, that for the most part the solution to controlling difficult or disruptive prisoners lies more in researching and adapting the regimes in the dispersal prisons from which they were transferred