disperse


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to disperse: disperse dye

dis·perse

 (dĭ-spûrs′)
v. dis·persed, dis·pers·ing, dis·pers·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To drive off or scatter in different directions: The police dispersed the crowd. See Synonyms at scatter.
b. To strew or distribute widely: The airplane dispersed the leaflets over the city.
2. To cause to attenuate and disappear: The sun dispersed the fog.
3.
a. To separate (light) into spectral rays.
b. To distribute (particles) evenly throughout a medium.
v.intr.
1. To separate and move in different directions; scatter: The crowd dispersed once the concert ended.
2. To attenuate and vanish; dissipate: The storm clouds had dispersed by noon.

[Middle English dispersen, from Old French disperser, from Latin dispergere, dispers-, to disperse : dis-, apart; see dis- + spargere, to scatter.]

dis·pers′ed·ly (-spûr′sĭd-lē) adv.
dis·pers′er n.
dis·pers′i·ble adj.

disperse

(dɪˈspɜːs)
vb
1. to scatter; distribute over a wide area
2. to dissipate or cause to dissipate
3. to leave or cause to leave a gathering, often in a random manner
4. to separate or be separated by dispersion
5. (Communications & Information) (tr) to diffuse or spread (news, information, etc)
6. (Chemistry) to separate (particles) throughout a solid, liquid, or gas, as in the formation of a suspension or colloid
adj
(Chemistry) of or consisting of the particles in a colloid or suspension: disperse phase.
[C14: from Latin dispērsus scattered, from dispergere to scatter widely, from di-2 + spargere to strew]
dispersedly adv
disˈperser n
Usage: See at disburse

dis•perse

(dɪˈspɜrs)

v. -persed, -pers•ing. v.t.
1. to drive or send off in various directions; scatter.
2. to spread widely; disseminate.
3. to dispel; cause to vanish: The wind dispersed the fog.
4. to cause (particles) to separate uniformly throughout a solid, liquid, or gas.
5. to subject (light) to dispersion.
v.i.
6. to separate and move apart in different directions without order or regularity; become scattered.
7. to be dispelled; vanish.
[1350–1400; < Latin dispersus, past participle of dispergere=di- di-2 + -spergere, derivative of spargere to scatter, strew]
dis•pers′ed•ly, adv.
dis•pers′er, n.
dis•pers′i•ble, adj.
syn: See scatter.

disperse


Past participle: dispersed
Gerund: dispersing

Imperative
disperse
disperse
Present
I disperse
you disperse
he/she/it disperses
we disperse
you disperse
they disperse
Preterite
I dispersed
you dispersed
he/she/it dispersed
we dispersed
you dispersed
they dispersed
Present Continuous
I am dispersing
you are dispersing
he/she/it is dispersing
we are dispersing
you are dispersing
they are dispersing
Present Perfect
I have dispersed
you have dispersed
he/she/it has dispersed
we have dispersed
you have dispersed
they have dispersed
Past Continuous
I was dispersing
you were dispersing
he/she/it was dispersing
we were dispersing
you were dispersing
they were dispersing
Past Perfect
I had dispersed
you had dispersed
he/she/it had dispersed
we had dispersed
you had dispersed
they had dispersed
Future
I will disperse
you will disperse
he/she/it will disperse
we will disperse
you will disperse
they will disperse
Future Perfect
I will have dispersed
you will have dispersed
he/she/it will have dispersed
we will have dispersed
you will have dispersed
they will have dispersed
Future Continuous
I will be dispersing
you will be dispersing
he/she/it will be dispersing
we will be dispersing
you will be dispersing
they will be dispersing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dispersing
you have been dispersing
he/she/it has been dispersing
we have been dispersing
you have been dispersing
they have been dispersing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dispersing
you will have been dispersing
he/she/it will have been dispersing
we will have been dispersing
you will have been dispersing
they will have been dispersing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dispersing
you had been dispersing
he/she/it had been dispersing
we had been dispersing
you had been dispersing
they had been dispersing
Conditional
I would disperse
you would disperse
he/she/it would disperse
we would disperse
you would disperse
they would disperse
Past Conditional
I would have dispersed
you would have dispersed
he/she/it would have dispersed
we would have dispersed
you would have dispersed
they would have dispersed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.disperse - distribute loosely; "He scattered gun powder under the wagon"
spray - scatter in a mass or jet of droplets; "spray water on someone"; "spray paint on the wall"
spray - be discharged in sprays of liquid; "Water sprayed all over the floor"
spatter, splatter, plash, swash, splash, splosh - dash a liquid upon or against; "The mother splashed the baby's face with water"
splash, sprinkle, splosh - cause (a liquid) to spatter about, especially with force; "She splashed the water around her"
discharge - pour forth or release; "discharge liquids"
bespangle - dot or sprinkle with sparkling or glittering objects
aerosolize, aerosolise - disperse as an aerosol; "The bacteria suspension was aerosolized"
2.disperse - to cause to separate and go in different directions; "She waved her hand and scattered the crowds"
disband - cause to break up or cease to function; "the principal disbanded the political student organization"
divide, separate - make a division or separation
3.disperse - cause to separate; "break up kidney stones"; "disperse particles"
change integrity - change in physical make-up
backscatter - scatter (radiation) by the atoms of the medium through which it passes
4.disperse - move away from each other; "The crowds dispersed"; "The children scattered in all directions when the teacher approached";
aerosolise, aerosolize - become dispersed as an aerosol; "the bacteria quickly aerosolised"
break - scatter or part; "The clouds broke after the heavy downpour"
volley - be dispersed in a volley; "gun shots volleyed at the attackers"
part, split, separate - go one's own way; move apart; "The friends separated after the party"
5.disperse - separate (light) into spectral rays; "the prosm disperses light"
separate - divide into components or constituents; "Separate the wheat from the chaff"
6.disperse - cause to become widely known; "spread information"; "circulate a rumor"; "broadcast the news"
publicize, bare, publicise, air - make public; "She aired her opinions on welfare"
podcast - distribute (multimedia files) over the internet for playback on a mobile device or a personal computer
sow - introduce into an environment; "sow suspicion or beliefs"
circulate, go around, spread - become widely known and passed on; "the rumor spread"; "the story went around in the office"
popularise, popularize, vulgarise, vulgarize, generalise, generalize - cater to popular taste to make popular and present to the general public; bring into general or common use; "They popularized coffee in Washington State"; "Relativity Theory was vulgarized by these authors"
carry, run - include as the content; broadcast or publicize; "We ran the ad three times"; "This paper carries a restaurant review"; "All major networks carried the press conference"

disperse

verb
1. scatter, spread, distribute, circulate, strew, diffuse, dissipate, disseminate, throw about Intense currents disperse the sewage.
2. break up, separate, dismiss, disappear, send off, vanish, scatter, dissolve, rout, dispel, disband, part company, demobilize, go (their) separate ways The crowd dispersed peacefully.
break up collect, gather, pool, concentrate, assemble, muster, convene, amass, congregate
3. dissolve, disappear, vanish, evaporate, break up, dissipate, melt away, evanesce The fog dispersed and I became aware of the sun. see disburse

disperse

verb
1. To cause to separate and go in various directions:
2. To pass (something) out:
3. To extend over a wide area:
4. To disappear by or as if by rising:
Translations
يُبَدِّد، يُشَتِّتيَخْتَفي، يَتَفَرَّقيُوَزِّع، يَنْشُر
rozejít serozprchnoutrozptýlitrozšířitroztrousit
sprede
szóródik
dreifatvístrast
išnešiotiišsiskirstymasišsiskirstytiišsisklaidymasišskirstymas
izkaisītizklīdinātizkliedētizklīstizplatīt
razpršiti se
dağılmakdağıtmakyay mak

disperse

[dɪsˈpɜːs]
A. VT (= scatter) [+ crowd] → dispersar; [+ news] → propagar; [+ light] → descomponer
B. VI [crowd, army, troops] → dispersarse; [mist] → disiparse

disperse

[dɪˈspɜːrs]
vt
[+ seeds] → disséminer
[+ gas] → propager; [+ smoke, substance] → disperser
[+ crowd, demonstrators] → disperser
[+ knowledge] → propager
vi
[+ gas] → se propager; [+ smoke, fog] → se dissiper; [+ substance] → se disperser
[crowd, demonstrators] → se disperser
[+ seeds] → se disperser

disperse

vt (= scatter widely)verstreuen; (Bot) seedverteilen; (= dispel) crowd, mistzerstreuen, auflösen; oil slickauflösen; (Opt) lightstreuen; (Chem) particlesdispergieren; (fig) knowledge etcverbreiten
visich zerstreuen or auflösen; (oil slick)sich auflösen

disperse

[dɪsˈpɜːs]
1. vt (crowd, demonstrators, oil slick) → disperdere
2. vi (crowd) → disperdersi; (mist) → dissiparsi

disperse

(diˈspəːs) verb
1. to (cause to) scatter in all directions. Some seeds are dispersed by the wind.
2. to (cause to) spread (news etc). Information is dispersed by volunteers who distribute leaflets.
3. to (cause to) vanish. By this time the crowd had dispersed.
diˈspersal noun

dis·perse

vt. dispersar, disipar.
References in classic literature ?
Margaret seemed to find it a little hard to tell hers, and waved a brake before her face, as if to disperse imaginary gnats, while she said slowly, "I should like a lovely house, full of all sorts of luxurious things--nice food, pretty clothes, handsome furniture, pleasant people, and heaps of money.
As they gradually rose from the level of the valleys, the thick darkness which usually precedes the approach of day began to disperse, and objects were seen in the plain and palpable colors with which they had been gifted by nature.
The man who had addressed Haley, and who seemed not destitute of compassion, bought her for a trifle, and the spectators began to disperse.
His idea was still with me, because it was not a vapour sunshine could disperse, nor a sand-traced effigy storms could wash away; it was a name graven on a tablet, fated to last as long as the marble it inscribed.
He rose to his feet again, pushed his logs together, and, throwing on some dried leaves and sticks, raised a flame; but the flame did not disperse the vision-- it only lit up more distinctly the little round form of the child, and its shabby clothing.
So much the rather thou Celestial light Shine inward, and the mind through all her powers Irradiate, there plant eyes, all mist from thence Purge and disperse, that I may see and tell Of things invisible to mortal sight.
the hollow vein (vena cava), which is the principal receptacle of the blood, and the trunk of the tree, as it were, of which all the other veins in the body are branches; and the arterial vein (vena arteriosa), inappropriately so denominated, since it is in truth only an artery, which, taking its rise in the heart, is divided, after passing out from it, into many branches which presently disperse themselves all over the lungs; in the second place, the cavity in the left side, with which correspond in the same manner two canals in size equal to or larger than the preceding, viz.
More than one trapper has lost his life in battle with enraged baboons who will hesitate to attack nothing upon one occasion, while upon another a single gun shot will disperse hundreds of them.
In the bottle the acids were long ago resolved; the imperial dye had softened with time, as the colour grows richer in stained windows; and the glow of hot autumn afternoons on hillside vineyards, was ready to be set free and to disperse the fogs of London.
Athos cast a glance over the epistle, and to disperse all the suspicions that might have been created, read aloud:
All attempts to disperse the groups collected in the streets, or silence their exclamations, were in vain.
These holy men exerted their influence to quiet the people, but not to disperse them.