dispositive

dis·pos·i·tive

 (dĭs-pŏz′ĭ-tĭv)
adj. Law
1. Relating to or determining the outcome of a case or decision.
2. Relating to or involving the distribution of property, as through a trust or will.

dispositive

(dɪsˈpɒzɪtɪv)
adj
with a disposing quality
n
obsolete a thing that disposes, such as a legal document

dis•pos•i•tive

(dɪˈspɒz ɪ tɪv)

adj.
involving or affecting disposition or settlement.
[1475–85]
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References in periodicals archive ?
the notice is a request for award of discount contracts with all contractors equal force and not dispositive conditions including the determination of the discount.
Heiland may be deemed to have shared voting and dispositive power with respect to the 1,353,200 shares of common stock of the Company beneficially owned by JEC, of which 500 shares are owned of record.
Rather it is a contract dispute between private parties, turning almost entirely on construction of a private contract, and failing to present any dispositive question of federal law.
The dispositive portion says that Estrada's political rights, which includes the right to suffrage, right to run for public office is supposed to be restored is very clear," he said.
Raja has taken and defended depositions, attended mediated settlement conferences, successfully negotiated favorable settlements, and argued numerous dispositive and non-dispositive motions in North Carolina and Florida trial courts.
Mere time spent in one place or another can be significant, but not dispositive, especially if you are compelled by business or some other similar factor to be present in a place.
The topics include theoretical and methodological aspects of Foucauldian critical discourse analysis and dispositive analysis, a context-sensitive approach to analyzing talk in strategy meetings, towards a systematization of critical discourse analysis categories in the representation of social groups, Slovenia as a case study in the media representation of the discrimination against the Roma in eastern Europe, reflections on discourse and critique in China and the West, and visual arguments in political leaflets of Austrian and British far-right parties.
The dispositive event was when Franklin Roosevelt, upon taking office in 1933, took the dollar off the gold standard and once that happened, prices started to rise.
These considerations now were dispositive of' any claims of negligence in the medical decisions concerning the treatment the patient needed and received.
In most cases--about 85 percent of the time--a negative recommendation from a proxy advisory firm was not dispositive.
may help employers when it comes to pursuing dispositive motions.
My thanks to William Hourigan of Decatur, who pointed out that for Illinois there is a dispositive opinion, In re Marriage of Zells, 143 Ill 2d 251, 572 NE2d 944 (1991), decided by the Illinois Supreme Court.