disruption


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dis·rupt

 (dĭs-rŭpt′)
tr.v. dis·rupt·ed, dis·rupt·ing, dis·rupts
1. To throw into confusion or disorder: Protesters disrupted the candidate's speech.
2. To interrupt or impede the progress of: Our efforts in the garden were disrupted by an early frost. The noise disrupted my nap.
3. To break apart or alter so as to prevent normal or expected functioning: radiation that disrupts DNA and kills bacteria.

[Latin disrumpere, disrupt-, to break apart : dis-, dis- + rumpere, to break apart; see reup- in Indo-European roots.]

dis·rupt′er, dis·rup′tor n.
dis·rup′tion n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disruption - an act of delaying or interrupting the continuity; "it was presented without commercial breaks"; "there was a gap in his account"
cut-in, insert - (film) a still picture that is introduced and that interrupts the action of a film
cut-in, insert - (broadcasting) a local announcement inserted into a network program
delay, holdup - the act of delaying; inactivity resulting in something being put off until a later time
interposition, interjection, interpellation, interpolation - the action of interjecting or interposing an action or remark that interrupts
abruption, breaking off - an instance of sudden interruption
barracking, heckling - shouting to interrupt a speech with which you disagree
2.disruption - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
disorder - a disturbance of the peace or of public order
turmoil, upheaval, convulsion - a violent disturbance; "the convulsions of the stock market"
earthquake - a disturbance that is extremely disruptive; "selling the company caused an earthquake among the employees"
incident - a public disturbance; "the police investigated an incident at the bus station"
stir, splash - a prominent or sensational but short-lived news event; "he made a great splash and then disappeared"
tempest, storm - a violent commotion or disturbance; "the storms that had characterized their relationship had died away"; "it was only a tempest in a teapot"
storm center, storm centre - a center of trouble or disturbance
garboil, tumult, tumultuousness, uproar - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
3.disruption - an event that results in a displacement or discontinuitydisruption - an event that results in a displacement or discontinuity
break, interruption - some abrupt occurrence that interrupts an ongoing activity; "the telephone is an annoying interruption"; "there was a break in the action when a player was hurt"
4.disruption - the act of causing disorder
disturbance - the act of disturbing something or someone; setting something in motion
breakdown, dislocation - the act of disrupting an established order so it fails to continue; "the social dislocations resulting from government policies"; "his warning came after the breakdown of talks in London"
surprisal, surprise - the act of surprising someone

disruption

noun disturbance, disorder, confusion, interference, disarray, interruption, stoppage, disorderliness delays and disruption to flights from Britain

disruption

noun
1. The act or an example of upsetting:
2. A cessation of continuity or regularity:
Translations
تَمْزيق، تَعْطيل
rušení
sammenbrud
széthullásszéttörés
upplausn; truflun
engel olmasekte vurma

disruption

[dɪsˈrʌpʃən] N [of meeting, communications] → interrupción f; [of plans] → alteración f

disruption

[dɪsˈrʌpʃən] n [plans, meeting, lesson] → perturbation f; [services] → perturbation f

disruption

nStörung f; (of lesson, meeting, conversation, train service also)Unterbrechung f

disruption

[dɪsˈrʌpʃn] n (see vb) → interruzione f; (XXX) → caos m, scombussolamento

disrupt

(disˈrapt) verb
to break up or put into a state of disorder. Rioters disrupted the meeting; Traffic was disrupted by floods.
disˈruption (-ʃən) noun
disˈruptive (-tiv) adjective
causing disorder. a disruptive child.
References in classic literature ?
But an unlucky allusion to his previous remarks on Kearney's attentions to Jessie, and a querulous regret that he had permitted a disruption of their social intimacy, brought such an ominous and frigid opposition, not only from Christie, but even the frivolous Jessie herself, that Carr sank back in a crushed and terrified silence.
A disruption of the Federal Union, heretofore only menaced, is now formidably attempted.
His father - that iron gentleman - had long ago enthroned himself on the heights of the Disruption Principles.
Nicholson was ambitious for his family (in which, and the Disruption Principles, he entirely lived), and he hated to see a son of his play second fiddle to an idler.
Others have endeavored to account for these discharges of "mountain artillery" on humbler principles; attributing them to the loud reports made by the disruption and fall of great masses of rock, reverberated and prolonged by the echoes; others, to the disengagement of hydrogen, produced by subterraneous beds of coal in a state of ignition.
These phenomena were occasioned by the expansion of the gas, through increase of heat in the atmosphere, and the consequent disruption of the minute particles of ice with which the network had become encrusted during the night.
Beyond a certain limit no mechanical disruption of the body could hasten the process of decomposition.
In the cities of the Mercenaries and of the labor castes similar programmes of disruption were to be carried out.
Summary: OPEC could call an emergency meeting if required by disruption to oil supply .
Circadian disruption appears to be a previously unrecognized risk factor underlying the susceptibility to or development of alcoholic liver disease," said Fred W.
Urethral disruption is an uncommon injury that primarily results from pelvic trauma.
Summary: Etisalat apologizes to its customers for a brief mobile service disruption that