dissection


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to dissection: aortic dissection, Dissection of aorta

dis·sec·tion

 (dĭ-sĕk′shən, dī-)
n.
1. The act or an instance of dissecting.
2. Something that has been dissected, such as a tissue specimen under study.
3. A detailed examination or analysis.

dis•sec•tion

(dɪˈsɛk ʃən, daɪ-)

n.
1. the act of dissecting.
2. something that has been dissected.
3. a detailed analysis.
[1575–85; < Latin]

dissection

Surgical separation of tissues.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dissection - cutting so as to separate into piecesdissection - cutting so as to separate into pieces
cutting, cut - the act of cutting something into parts; "his cuts were skillful"; "his cutting of the cake made a terrible mess"
2.dissection - a minute and critical analysis
analytic thinking, analysis - the abstract separation of a whole into its constituent parts in order to study the parts and their relations
3.dissection - detailed critical analysis or examination one part at a time (as of a literary work)
analysis - an investigation of the component parts of a whole and their relations in making up the whole

dissection

noun
1. cutting up, anatomy, autopsy, dismemberment, postmortem (examination), necropsy, anatomization a growing supply of corpses for dissection
2. analysis, examination, breakdown, research, investigation, inspection, scrutiny the dissection of my proposals

dissection

noun
The separation of a whole into its parts for study:
Translations
تَشْريحُ الجُثَّه
pitvapitvání
dissektion
boncolásfelboncolás
krufning
pitvanie

dissection

[dɪˈsekʃən] N [of animal] → disección f (fig) → análisis m inv minucioso

dissection

[dɪˈsɛkʃən daɪˈsɛkʃən] n
(lit) [animal, corpse] → dissection f
(fig) [theory, situation, issue] → dissection f; [account, book, report, article] → épluchage m

dissection

n
(= act) (of plant)Präparation f; (of animal)Sektion f; (fig, of report, theory) → Zergliederung f
(= plant or animal dissected)Präparat nt

dissection

[dɪˈsɛkʃn] n (see vb) → dissezione f, svisceramento

dissect

(diˈsekt) verb
to cut (eg an animal's body) into parts for (scientific) examination.
disˈsection (-ʃən) noun

dis·sec·tion

n. disección.

dissection

n disección f; aortic — disección aórtica or de aorta; lymph node — disección ganglionar, (complete) vaciamiento ganglionar
References in classic literature ?
Now, by the above dissection, the reader will see that in Germany a man may THINK he is a man, but when he comes to look into the matter closely, he is bound to have his doubts; he finds that in sober truth he is a most ridiculous mixture; and if he ends by trying to comfort himself with the thought that he can at least depend on a third of this mess as being manly and masculine, the humiliating second thought will quickly remind him that in this respect he is no better off than any woman or cow in the land.
The internal anatomy, I may remark here, as dissection has since shown, was almost equally simple.
As no trace of an opening could be found, Doctor Ponnonner was preparing his instruments for dissection, when I observed that it was then past two o'clock.
The unhappiness of Philip's life at school had called up in him the power of self-analysis; and this vice, as subtle as drug-taking, had taken possession of him so that he had now a peculiar keenness in the dissection of his feelings.
Almost surreptitiously she slipped a clean sheet in front of her, and her hand, descending, began drawing square boxes halved and quartered by straight lines, and then circles which underwent the same process of dissection.
In South America, a burrowing rodent, the tuco-tuco, or Ctenomys, is even more subterranean in its habits than the mole; and I was assured by a Spaniard, who had often caught them, that they were frequently blind; one which I kept alive was certainly in this condition, the cause, as appeared on dissection, having been inflammation of the nictitating membrane.
Mysterious as this circumstance appears to be, it is not more surprising than that the body of one's fellow-creature, directly after death, and before putrefaction has commenced, should often be of so deleterious a quality, that the mere puncture from an instrument used in its dissection, should prove fatal.
The observer stood with her hand upon her own bosom, looking at the girl, as one afflicted with a diseased part might curiously watch the dissection and exposition of an analogous case.
Here's a wenerable old lady a--lyin' on the carpet waitin' for dissection, or galwinism, or some other rewivin' and scientific inwention.
He had no time for dissections, but he knew that he thought of the bullets only as things that could prevent him from reaching the place of his endeavor.
We conducted a study to evaluate the hypothesis that the preservation of cervical root branches of the cervical plexus is associated with greater shoulder mobility, less loss of face and neck sensation, and better quality of life (QoL) following functional neck dissection in which the spinal accessory nerve is spared.
Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) overall remains a relatively rare cause of acute coronary syndromes and tends to affect the young healthy population, with a female preponderance.