dissensus

dissensus

(dɪˈsɛnsəs)
n
a lack of consensus; disagreement within a group
References in periodicals archive ?
Normative competition, conflicts, or dissensus are a key characteristic of social disorganisation, and one of the by-products of disorganisation is an increase in deviant behaviour which is a natural by-product of rapid social change.
For him, the researcher of literature's worlding should not subsume the dissensus that underlies it under consensus, but advocates a "politics of research, which implies readdressing, reaffirming and reinstating this dissensus.
Throughout this last section, I use 'constellations' of students' comments drawn from interview transcripts to help convey the dissensus and pedagogic subjectivation (Ranciere, 2010) of students as they engage with my efforts to enact a negotiated grading contract.
Where there is dissensus, the moral terrain is suddenly vexed.
In the comparison, numbers of consensus and dissensus were determined and reliability of the research was calculated by using Miles and Huberman (1994) formula of Reliability = Consensus / (Consensus + Dissensus).
An odd dissensus between confident metaphysicians and neopragmatist antimetaphysicians pervades early twenty-first-century analytic philosophy.
Sadly, expectation was transmuted into disappointment, since he merely spelled out those "needs" in a list of eight subject areas that people need information about, running from risks and emergencies, through health and welfare, education, the environment, politics, and so forth--nothing, then, on the quality of the information provided; how it is selected, framed, and packaged; with what choices of policy direction citizens are presented; how patterns of consensus and dissensus among political advocates are depicted; how conventional news values fit in; and how it all relates to how members of the public wish to be addressed and are encouraged (or discouraged) to get involved.
lt;<consensus and dissensus on public spectacles in Early Byzantium>>, en: Garland, L.
Specifically, it smooths over the contours of dissensus and fractional (bio-)politics that made effective opposition to the outside threat so difficult.
The image-ethics of di-lemma here operates on the binary of (mis)representation, which has a distinct ethical aspect, transforming Rembrandt's painting in the scene of metapictorial discourse between Barbara and Andre into a multistable image of dissensus.
For Ranciere, disagreement and dissensus are not problems to be overcome, as many political philosophers have argued; instead, these are the only forces that can push, however incompletely, towards a more egalitarian future.
In other words, while the tension between her identity and her "mystery" comes close what Ranciere describes as dissensus, that is, as an event of "putting two worlds in one and the same world," (Ranciere, 2004, p.