dissimulation


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Related to dissimulation: unperceived, suavity

dis·sim·u·late

 (dĭ-sĭm′yə-lāt′)
v. dis·sim·u·lat·ed, dis·sim·u·lat·ing, dis·sim·u·lates
v.tr.
To conceal (one's intentions, for example) under a feigned appearance. See Synonyms at disguise.
v.intr.
To conceal one's true feelings or intentions.

[Middle English dissimulaten, from Latin dissimulāre, dissimulāt- : dis-, dis- + simulāre, to simulate; see simulate.]

dis·sim′u·la′tion n.
dis·sim′u·la′tive adj.
dis·sim′u·la′tor n.

Dissimulation

 of birds: a flock—Bk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dissimulation - the act of deceiving
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts
fakery - the act of faking (or the product of faking)
indirection - deceitful action that is not straightforward; "he could see through the indirections of diplomats"
chicanery, wile, shenanigan, trickery, guile, chicane - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
double-dealing, duplicity - acting in bad faith; deception by pretending to entertain one set of intentions while acting under the influence of another
cheating, cheat - a deception for profit to yourself
head game, illusion, delusion - the act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas
pretending, pretense, feigning, simulation, pretence - the act of giving a false appearance; "his conformity was only pretending"
imposture, impersonation - pretending to be another person
obscurantism - a deliberate act intended to make something obscure
four flush, bluff - the act of bluffing in poker; deception by a false show of confidence in the strength of your cards
take-in - the act of taking in as by fooling or cheating or swindling someone
Translations

dissimulation

[dɪˌsɪmjʊˈleɪʃən] Ndisimulación f

dissimulation

nVerstellung f, → Heuchelei f

dissimulation

[dɪˌsɪmjʊˈleɪʃn] n (frm) → dissimulazione f
References in classic literature ?
Lecount could trust in her own powers of dissimulation, and in the results which they might achieve.
The Court, from that exclusive inner circle to its outermost rotten ring of intrigue, corruption, and dissimulation, was all gone together.
But although no man with less scruple made his ordinary habits and feelings bend to his interest, it was the misfortune of this Prince, that his levity and petulance were perpetually breaking out, and undoing all that had been gained by his previous dissimulation.
The viceroy, hearing that I was returned to my residence, did not discover any concern or chagrin as at a disappointment, for such was his privacy and dissimulation that the most penetrating could never form any conjecture that could be depended on, about his designs, till everything was ready for the execution of them.
The liberal and the royalist had mutually divined each other in spite of the wide dissimulation with which they hid their common hope from the rest of the town.
Anne of Austria believed that Louis XIII knew all, and that the cardinal had persuaded him to employ this long dissimulation of seven or eight days, which, likewise, was characteristic.
Thus the Genoese, subtle as he was, was duped by Edmond, in whose favor his mild demeanor, his nautical skill, and his admirable dissimulation, pleaded.
In war, practice dissimulation, and you will succeed.
Good," said Mazarin, "I am glad to see that his majesty has been brought up with a hatred of dissimulation.
The pupil in the school possessing the happiest disposition was a young girl from the country, Louise Path; she was sufficiently benevolent and obliging, but not well taught nor well mannered; moreover, the plague-spot of dissimulation was in her also; honour and principle were unknown to her, she had scarcely heard their names.
Extreme unction had been administered to the cardinal, who, faithful to his habits of dissimulation, struggled against appearances, and even against reality, receiving company in his bed, as if he only suffered from a temporary complaint.
Madame de Bellegarde closed her eyes and gave a little cough, which, as a piece of dissimulation, struck Newman as really heroic.