amnesia

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Related to Dissociative amnesia: dissociative identity disorder

am·ne·sia

 (ăm-nē′zhə)
n.
Partial or total loss of memory, usually resulting from shock, psychological disturbance, brain injury, or illness.

[Greek amnēsiā, forgetfulness, probably alteration of amnēstiā, from amnēstos, not remembered : a-, not; see a-1 + mimnēskein, mnē-, to remember; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

am·ne′si·ac′ (-nē′zē-ăk′, -zhē-ăk′), am·ne′sic (-zĭk, -sĭk) n. & adj.
am·nes′tic (-nĕs′tĭk) adj.

amnesia

(æmˈniːzjə; -ʒjə; -zɪə)
n
(Medicine) a defect in memory, esp one resulting from a pathological cause, such as brain damage or hysteria
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: forgetfulness, probably from amnēstia oblivion; see amnesty]
amnesiac, amnesic adj, n

am•ne•sia

(æmˈni ʒə)

n.
loss of a large block of interrelated memories; complete or partial loss of memory caused by brain injury, shock, etc.
[1780–90; < New Latin < Greek amnēsía, variant of amnēstía oblivion. See amnesty]
am•nes′tic (-ˈnɛs tɪk) adj.

am·ne·sia

(ăm-nē′zhə)
A partial or total loss of memory, usually caused by shock or brain injury.

amnesia

a loss or lack of memory. — amnesiac, n. — amnesie, adj.
See also: Memory

amnesia

1. Memory loss, sometimes due to a blow on the head or some other damage to brain function, or to neurotic disorder as a result of inner conflict.
2. The inability to memorize and/or to recall previously memorized information. This can be caused by damage to the brain resulting from physical injury or disease.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.amnesia - partial or total loss of memoryamnesia - partial or total loss of memory; "he has a total blackout for events of the evening"
cognitive state, state of mind - the state of a person's cognitive processes
anterograde amnesia, posttraumatic amnesia - loss of memory for events immediately following a trauma; sometimes in effect for events during and for a long time following the trauma
retrograde amnesia - loss of memory for events immediately preceding a trauma
forgetfulness - tendency to forget
selective amnesia - amnesia about particular events that is very convenient for the person who cannot remember; "why do politicians always develop selective amnesia when questioned about their transgressions?"
transient global amnesia - memory disorder seen in middle aged and elderly persons; characterized by an episode of amnesia and bewilderment that lasts for several hours; person is otherwise alert and intellectually active
Translations
فُقْدان الذَّاكِرَه، نِسْيان
amnézie
amnesihukommelsessvigthukommelsestab
amnezija
emlékezetvesztés
óminni
amnezijaatminties netekimas
amnēzijaatmiņas zudums
amnezie
amnézia
amnezihafıza kaybı

amnesia

[æmˈniːzɪə] Namnesia f

amnesia

[æmˈniːziə] namnésie f
to have amnesia → être amnésique
to suffer from amnesia → souffrir d'amnésie
selective amnesia → amnésie sélective
collective amnesia → amnésie collective

amnesia

amnesia

[æmˈniːzɪə] namnesia

amnesia

(ӕmˈniːziə) noun
loss of memory. After falling on his head he suffered from amnesia.

am·ne·si·a

n. amnesia, pérdida de la memoria.

amnesia

n amnesia
References in periodicals archive ?
The Dissociative Disorders listed in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) include Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly multiple personality disorder), Dissociative Amnesia and Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder.
They include characters who have antisocial personality disorder, schizophrenia, hoarding disorder, dissociative amnesia, substance use disorder, AspergerAEs syndrome, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, pediatric psychiatric disease, frontal lobe syndrome, and others, such as Samson, Henry Jekyll, Sherlock Holmes, and characters in Nicolai GogolAEs Diary of a Madman, Herman MelvilleAEs Bartleby the Scrivener, GogolAEs Dead Souls and The Nose, Winnie the Pooh, works by Charles Dickens and Edgar Allan Poe, HomerAEs The Iliad and The Odyssey, ShakespeareAEs Macbeth, Bram StokerAEs Dracula, and James JoyceAEs oA Painful Case,o as well as the painting The Village School by Jan Steen.
A diagnosis of Dissociative Amnesia with the specification of Dissociative Fugue (300.
Dissociative amnesia often occurs very soon after traumatic events (i.
Southwick, "Neural mechanisms in dissociative amnesia for childhood abuse", The American Journal of Psychiatry 153, no.
27) Unlike permanent amnesias due to some sort of physical or chemical altercation to the brain that prevents memory storage or retrieval, one unique aspect of dissociative amnesia is its reversibility: although the memory is presently inaccessible, it was at one point successfully stored and may therefore be regained.
My concern is that, on the basis of the impression left by these statements, some readers with a family or interpersonal connection to issues of childhood abuse could be influenced to doubt the veracity of someone they know who may be struggling with actual dissociative amnesia and in grave emotional distress.
ICD-10 classifies this disorder into dissociative amnesia, dissociative fatigue, dissociative stupor, dissociative disorders of movement and sensation, dissociative motor disorders, dissociative convulsions, dissociative anaesthesia and sensory loss, mixed dissociative [conversion] disorders and other dissociative [conversion] disorders3.
But she woke up suffering dissociative amnesia, a rare temporary memory disorder brought on by severe stress.
Naomi, from Toxteth, had been struck by dissociative amnesia, a condition which causes a disruption or breakdown of memory.
Generalized dissociative amnesia is difficult to differentiate from factitious disorder or malingering.
Dissociation is clinically seen in different forms, such as dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative identity, derealization, and depersonalization (1).