dissonance


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dis·so·nance

 (dĭs′ə-nəns)
n.
1. A harsh, disagreeable combination of sounds; discord.
2. Lack of agreement, consistency, or harmony; conflict: "In Vietnam, reality fell away and dissonance between claim and fact filled the void" (Michael Janeway).
3. Music A combination of tones contextually considered to suggest unrelieved tension and require resolution.

dissonance

(ˈdɪsənəns) or

dissonancy

n
1. a discordant combination of sounds
2. lack of agreement or consistency
3. (Music, other) music
a. a sensation commonly associated with all intervals of the second and seventh, all diminished and augmented intervals, and all chords based on these intervals. Compare consonance3
b. an interval or chord of this kind

dis•so•nance

(ˈdɪs ə nəns)

n.
1. inharmonious or harsh sound; discord; cacophony.
2. an unresolved, discordant musical chord or interval.
3. lack of harmony or agreement; incongruity.
[1565–75; < Late Latin dissonantia=dissonant- (see dissonant) + -ia -ia; see -ance]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dissonance - a conflict of people's opinions or actions or charactersdissonance - a conflict of people's opinions or actions or characters
conflict - a state of opposition between persons or ideas or interests; "his conflict of interest made him ineligible for the post"; "a conflict of loyalties"
disunity - lack of unity (usually resulting from dissension)
divide - a serious disagreement between two groups of people (typically producing tension or hostility)
2.dissonance - the auditory experience of sound that lacks musical quality; sound that is a disagreeable auditory experience; "modern music is just noise to me"
auditory sensation, sound - the subjective sensation of hearing something; "he strained to hear the faint sounds"
3.dissonance - disagreeable sounds
sound property - an attribute of sound
discordance, discord - a harsh mixture of sounds
disharmony, inharmoniousness - a lack of harmony
cacophony - loud confusing disagreeable sounds
harmony - an agreeable sound property

dissonance

noun
1. disagreement, variance, discord, dissension Bring harmony out of dissonance.

dissonance

noun
Translations
disonanceneshodanesouladnesouzvuk

dissonance

[ˈdɪsənəns] Ndisonancia f

dissonance

[ˈdɪsənəns] n
(= friction, clash) → discordance f
(MUSIC)dissonance f

dissonance

n (Mus, fig) → Dissonanz f

dissonance

[ˈdɪsənəns] n (frm) → dissonanza
References in classic literature ?
The smooth manner of the spy, curiously in dissonance with his ostentatiously rough dress, and probably with his usual demeanour, received such a check from the inscrutability of Carton,--who was a mystery to wiser and honester men than he,--that it faltered here and failed him.
Maddening church bells of all degrees of dissonance, sharp and flat, cracked and clear, fast and slow, made the brick-and-mortar echoes hideous.
But drive farr off the barbarous dissonance Of BACCHUS and his Revellers, the Race Of that wilde Rout that tore the THRACIAN Bard In RHODOPE, where Woods and Rocks had Eares To rapture, till the savage clamor dround Both Harp and Voice; nor could the Muse defend Her Son.
One of his most rational projects was to connect a musical operation with the machinery of his watches, so that all the harsh dissonances of life might be rendered tuneful, and each flitting moment fall into the abyss of the past in golden drops of harmony.
Research studies about hazing from the modern upper-class boarding schools of England to the gangs in the slums of South Africa were instrumental in creating the theory of cognitive dissonance first proposed by American social psychologist Leon Festinger.
The story is of dissonance, he says, by which he means incommensurable and antagonistic perspectives that exist within a shared world but do not add up to a coherent picture of it.
We argued that because of the self-reference effect, the enhanced association between self and unhealthy food would lead to cognitive dissonance.
These conflicting beliefs can be explained by cognitive dissonance theory.
Self-prophecies are a source of psychological discomfort (Spangenberg, Sprott, Grohmann, & Smith, 2003), a characteristic of the state of cognitive dissonance as defined by Festinger (1957).
China) in regards to the Internet-involved customer purchase process (IICPP), specifically the customer's involvement before purchase, the cognitive dissonance after purchase and the post-purchase behavior in terms of the online world of mouth (eWOM) and online negative word of mouth (eNWOM).
The answer lies in Leon Festinger's famous work on a psychological phenomenon called cognitive dissonance.