dissonant

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dis·so·nant

 (dĭs′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Harsh and inharmonious in sound; discordant.
2. Being at variance; disagreeing.
3. Music Constituting or producing a dissonance.

[Middle English dissonaunt, from Old French dissonant, from Latin dissonāns, dissonant-, present participle of dissonāre, to be dissonant : dis-, apart; see dis- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

dis′so·nant·ly adv.

dissonant

(ˈdɪsənənt)
adj
1. discordant; cacophonous
2. incongruous or discrepant
3. (Music, other) music characterized by dissonance
[C15: from Latin dissonāre to be discordant, from dis-1 + sonāre to sound]
ˈdissonantly adv

dis•so•nant

(ˈdɪs ə nənt)

adj.
1. disagreeing or harsh in sound; discordant.
2. disagreeing or incongruous; at variance.
3. harmonically unresolved.
[1400–50; late Middle English dissonaunte (< Anglo-French) < Latin dissonant-, s. of dissonāns, present participle of dissonāre to sound harsh]
dis′so•nant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dissonant - characterized by musical dissonance; harmonically unresolved
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
inharmonious, unharmonious - not in harmony
2.dissonant - lacking in harmony
inharmonious, unharmonious - not in harmony
3.dissonant - not in accord; "desires at variance with his duty"; "widely discrepant statements"
discordant - not in agreement or harmony; "views discordant with present-day ideas"

dissonant

adjective
1. disagreeing, differing, at variance, dissentient All but a few dissonant voices agree.
2. discordant, harsh, jarring, grating, raucous, strident, jangling, out of tune, tuneless, cacophonous, inharmonious, unmelodious Guitarists kept strumming wildly dissonant chords.

dissonant

adjective
1. Characterized by unpleasant discordance of sound:
2. Made up of parts or qualities that are disparate or otherwise markedly lacking in consistency:
Translations

dissonant

[ˈdɪsənənt] ADJdisonante

dissonant

[ˈdɪsənənt] adj
(MUSIC) [chord, harmony] → dissonant(e)
(= clashing) [voices, images] → discordant(e)

dissonant

adj (Mus) → dissonant; (fig) opinions, temperamentsunvereinbar; coloursdisharmonisch
References in periodicals archive ?
that is dissonantly edited over the image of penis-inserting Alex in front of the mirror looking at her/himself naked, in a three-quarter shot, but this time from behind.
But no previous laureate has Herrera's antic, improvisational, oracular, unfinished, messy, unruly, indeed uncivil qualities, and most dissonantly, his wild shifts in registers of multiple languages and his critiques of U.
They provide the crispness of the right word but the resulting image remains dissonantly unfinished and the portrait of the animal rather strange.
What Kincheloe indicates is important because a pre-service teacher has many naive conceptions of education, and because they are not yet true members of the profession--not yet immersed in the school's culture, in the experience of understanding the learning needs of children, or in the situation of having to understand the politics of a school, and the greater accountability issues of the 21st century--their epistemologies are dissonantly inadequate and should be primed for change.
On the one hand was the image of a panel of rabbis, familiar symbols of the Old World, dissonantly playing a part associated in the American Jewish mind with the modern politics of socialists and union organizers, on the stage of a mass rally at Cooper Union.
In a dissonantly similar incident in May 2004, his wife, who heard a car in their driveway in Nelspruit, South Africa, awaked former Springbok rugby player Rudi Visagie, CNN.
Yet, what sounds outrageous to us rings less dissonantly in the ears of a Scholastic friar trained in the Aristotelian tradition wherein theoretical space existed for chattel slavery.
Plaintive vocal thematic materials dissonantly leaning against the piano part heighten the mood of the text.
Republicans had successfully sold themselves as the party of economic growth, the party of the angry out-of-work American, and, most dissonantly, the party of change.