distemper


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dis·tem·per 1

 (dĭs-tĕm′pər)
n.
1. Any of various infectious diseases of animals, especially:
2. An illness or disease; an ailment: "He died ... of a broken heart, a distemper which kills many more than is generally imagined" (Henry Fielding).
3. Ill humor; testiness.
4. Disorder or disturbance, especially of a social or political nature.
tr.v. dis·tem·pered, dis·tem·per·ing, dis·tem·pers
1. To put out of order.
2. Archaic To unsettle; derange.

[From Middle English distemperen, to upset the balance of the humors, from Old French destemprer, to disturb, from Late Latin distemperāre : Latin dis-, dis- + Latin temperāre, to mix properly.]

dis·tem·per 2

 (dĭs-tĕm′pər)
n.
1.
a. A process of painting in which pigments are mixed with water and a glue-size or casein binder, used for flat wall decoration or scenic and poster painting.
b. The paint used in this process.
2. A painting made by this process.
tr.v. dis·tem·pered, dis·tem·per·ing, dis·tem·pers
1. To mix (powdered pigments or colors) with water and size.
2. To paint (a work) in distemper.

[Middle English distemperen, to dilute; see distemper1.]

distemper

(dɪsˈtɛmpə)
n
1. (Veterinary Science) any of various infectious diseases of animals, esp canine distemper, a highly contagious viral disease of dogs, characterized initially by high fever and a discharge from the nose and eyes. See also hard pad, strangles
2. (Medicine) archaic
a. a disease or disorder
b. disturbance
c. discontent
vb
(tr) archaic to disturb
[C14: from Late Latin distemperāre to derange the health of, from Latin dis-1 + temperāre to mix in correct proportions]

distemper

(dɪsˈtɛmpə)
n
1. (Colours) a technique of painting in which the pigments are mixed with water, glue, size, etc, used for poster, mural, and scene painting
2. (Colours) the paint used in this technique or any of various water-based paints, including, in Britain, whitewash
vb
3. (Colours) (tr) to mix (pigments) with water and size
4. (Colours) to paint (something) with distemper
[C14: from Medieval Latin distemperāre to soak, from Latin dis-1 + temperāre to mingle]

dis•tem•per1

(dɪsˈtɛm pər)

n.
1.
a. Also called canine distemper. an infectious disease chiefly of young dogs, caused by an unidentified virus and characterized by lethargy, fever, catarrh, photophobia, and vomiting.
b. Also called strangles. an infectious disease of horses, caused by the bacillus Streptococcus equi and characterized by catarrh of the upper air passages and the formation of pus in the submaxillary and other lymphatic glands.
c. Also called feline distemper. a usu. fatal viral disease of cats, characterized by fever, vomiting, and diarrhea, leading to severe dehydration.
2. a deranged condition of mind or body; a disorder or disease: a feverish distemper.
3. disorder or disturbance, esp. of a political nature.
v.t.
4. Obs. to derange physically or mentally.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Middle French destemprer) < Medieval Latin distemperāre= Latin dis- dis-1 + temperāre to temper]

dis•tem•per2

(dɪsˈtɛm pər)

n.
1. a technique of decorative painting in which glue or gum is used as a binder or medium to achieve a mat surface and rapid drying.
2. a painting executed by this method.
v.t.
3. to paint in distemper.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French distemprer) < Medieval Latin distemperāre to dissolve, dilute]

distemper


Past participle: distempered
Gerund: distempering

Imperative
distemper
distemper
Present
I distemper
you distemper
he/she/it distempers
we distemper
you distemper
they distemper
Preterite
I distempered
you distempered
he/she/it distempered
we distempered
you distempered
they distempered
Present Continuous
I am distempering
you are distempering
he/she/it is distempering
we are distempering
you are distempering
they are distempering
Present Perfect
I have distempered
you have distempered
he/she/it has distempered
we have distempered
you have distempered
they have distempered
Past Continuous
I was distempering
you were distempering
he/she/it was distempering
we were distempering
you were distempering
they were distempering
Past Perfect
I had distempered
you had distempered
he/she/it had distempered
we had distempered
you had distempered
they had distempered
Future
I will distemper
you will distemper
he/she/it will distemper
we will distemper
you will distemper
they will distemper
Future Perfect
I will have distempered
you will have distempered
he/she/it will have distempered
we will have distempered
you will have distempered
they will have distempered
Future Continuous
I will be distempering
you will be distempering
he/she/it will be distempering
we will be distempering
you will be distempering
they will be distempering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been distempering
you have been distempering
he/she/it has been distempering
we have been distempering
you have been distempering
they have been distempering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been distempering
you will have been distempering
he/she/it will have been distempering
we will have been distempering
you will have been distempering
they will have been distempering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been distempering
you had been distempering
he/she/it had been distempering
we had been distempering
you had been distempering
they had been distempering
Conditional
I would distemper
you would distemper
he/she/it would distemper
we would distemper
you would distemper
they would distemper
Past Conditional
I would have distempered
you would have distempered
he/she/it would have distempered
we would have distempered
you would have distempered
they would have distempered

distemper

A cheap and impermanent method of painting in which powdered colors are mixed with glue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.distemper - any of various infectious viral diseases of animals
animal disease - a disease that typically does not affect human beings
canine distemper - a viral disease of young dogs characterized by high fever and respiratory inflammation
equine distemper, strangles - an acute bacterial disease of horses characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes
2.distemper - an angry and disagreeable mood
humour, mood, temper, humor - a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor"
moodiness - a sullen gloomy feeling
3.distemper - paint made by mixing the pigments with water and a binder
paint, pigment - a substance used as a coating to protect or decorate a surface (especially a mixture of pigment suspended in a liquid); dries to form a hard coating; "artists use `paint' and `pigment' interchangeably"
4.distemper - a painting created with paint that is made by mixing the pigments with water and a binder
painting, picture - graphic art consisting of an artistic composition made by applying paints to a surface; "a small painting by Picasso"; "he bought the painting as an investment"; "his pictures hang in the Louvre"
5.distemper - a method of painting in which the pigments are mixed with water and a binder; used for painting posters or murals or stage scenery
painting - creating a picture with paints; "he studied painting and sculpture for many years"
Verb1.distemper - paint with distemper
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
paint - make a painting; "he painted all day in the garden"; "He painted a painting of the garden"
Translations
سُل الكِلابطِلاء جيري للحيطان
psinkatemperová barva
hundesygelimfarve
falfestékszopornyica
vatnsmálning
klijiniai dažaišunų maras
sunu sergatempera
psinka
badana boyasıit marazı

distemper

1 [dɪsˈtempəʳ]
A. N (= paint) → temple m
B. VTpintar al temple

distemper

2 [dɪsˈtempəʳ] N (Vet) → moquillo m (fig) → mal m

distemper

[dɪsˈtɛmpər] n
(= paint) (in art)détrempe f; (for walls)badigeon m
(= canine illness) → maladie f de Carré

distemper

1
n (= paint)Temperafarbe f

distemper

2
n
(Vet) → Staupe f
(old, = ill temper) → Verstimmung f

distemper

1 [dɪsˈtɛmpəʳ] n (paint) → tempera

distemper

2 [dɪsˈtɛmpəʳ] n (disease) → cimurro

distemper

(diˈstempə) noun
1. a kind of paint used on walls.
2. an infectious disease especially in dogs.

dis·tem·per

n. destemplanza, cualquier trastorno físico o mental.
References in classic literature ?
Again, God said, let ther be Firmament Amid the Waters, and let it divide The Waters from the Waters: and God made The Firmament, expanse of liquid, pure, Transparent, Elemental Air, diffus'd In circuit to the uttermost convex Of this great Round: partition firm and sure, The Waters underneath from those above Dividing: for as Earth, so hee the World Built on circumfluous Waters calme, in wide Crystallin Ocean, and the loud misrule Of CHAOS farr remov'd, least fierce extreames Contiguous might distemper the whole frame: And Heav'n he nam'd the Firmament: So Eev'n And Morning CHORUS sung the second Day.
To speak now of the true temper of empire, it is a thing rare and hard to keep; for both temper, and distemper, consist of contraries.
I seemed less often on an eminence or in a pit; my glassy azure dales had gentler slopes, or a distemper was melting from my eyes.
I forget which was the first distemper I plunged into - some fearful, devastating scourge, I know - and, before I had glanced half down the list of "premonitory symptoms," it was borne in upon me that I had fairly got it.
I found, indeed, some intervals of reflection; and the serious thoughts did, as it were, endeavour to return again sometimes; but I shook them off, and roused myself from them as it were from a distemper, and applying myself to drinking and company, soon mastered the return of those fits - for so I called them; and I had in five or six days got as complete a victory over conscience as any young fellow that resolved not to be troubled with it could desire.
It was near five weeks that I kept my bed and though the violence of my fever abated in three weeks, yet it several times returned; and the physicians said two or three times, they could do no more for me, but that they must leave nature and the distemper to fight it out, only strengthening the first with cordials to maintain the struggle.
If I had been ill of no other distemper, I know the proverb too well to have let him come to me.
I smiled and said, 'No, indeed, sir, that's none of my distemper.
At last I broke the way myself in the family for my removing; for being talking seriously with the old lady one day, about my own circumstances in the world, and how my distemper had left a heaviness upon my spirits, that I was not the same thing I was before, the old lady said, 'I am afraid, Betty, what I have said to you about my son has had some influence upon you, and that you are melancholy on his account; pray, will you let me know how the matter stands with you both, if it may not be improper?
Yet all these things had no effect upon me, or at least not enough to resist the strong inclination I had to go abroad again, which hung about me like a chronic distemper.
But in the middle of all this felicity, one blow from unseen Providence unhinged me at once; and not only made a breach upon me inevitable and incurable, but drove me, by its consequences, into a deep relapse of the wandering disposition, which, as I may say, being born in my very blood, soon recovered its hold of me; and, like the returns of a violent distemper, came on with an irresistible force upon me.
My nephew knew nothing how far my distemper of wandering was returned upon me, and I knew nothing of what he had in his thought to say, when that very morning, before he came to me, I had, in a great deal of confusion of thought, and revolving every part of my circumstances in my mind, come to this resolution, that I would go to Lisbon, and consult with my old sea-captain; and if it was rational and practicable, I would go and see the island again, and what was become of my people there.