distract


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dis·tract

 (dĭ-străkt′)
tr.v. dis·tract·ed, dis·tract·ing, dis·tracts
1. To cause (someone) to have difficulty paying attention to something: The voices in the other room distracted him, so he couldn't concentrate on his homework.
2. To attract (the attention) away from its original focus; divert.
3. To cause to feel worried or uneasy; unsettle: The company's workforce was distracted by the prospect of a takeover.

[Middle English distracten, from Latin distrahere, distract-, to pull away : dis-, apart; see dis- + trahere, to draw.]

dis·tract′i·bil′i·ty n.
dis·tract′i·ble adj.
dis·tract′ing·ly adv.
dis·trac′tive adj.

distract

(dɪˈstrækt)
vb (tr)
1. (often passive) to draw the attention of (a person) away from something
2. to divide or confuse the attention of (a person)
3. to amuse or entertain
4. (Psychology) to trouble greatly
5. (Psychology) to make mad
[C14: from Latin distractus perplexed, from distrahere to pull in different directions, from dis-1 + trahere to drag]
disˈtracter n
disˈtractible adj
disˌtractiˈbility n
disˈtracting adj
disˈtractingly adv
disˈtractive adj
disˈtractively adv

dis•tract

(dɪˈstrækt)

v.t.
1. to draw away or divert, as the mind or attention: The music distracted us from our work.
2. to disturb or trouble greatly in mind; beset.
3. to provide a pleasant diversion for; amuse; entertain.
4. to separate or divide by dissension or strife.
adj.
5. Obs. distracted.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin distractus, past participle of distrahere to draw apart =dis- dis-1 + trahere to draw]
dis•tract′i•ble, adj.
dis•tract′i•bil`i•ty, n.
dis•tract′ing•ly, adv.

distract


Past participle: distracted
Gerund: distracting

Imperative
distract
distract
Present
I distract
you distract
he/she/it distracts
we distract
you distract
they distract
Preterite
I distracted
you distracted
he/she/it distracted
we distracted
you distracted
they distracted
Present Continuous
I am distracting
you are distracting
he/she/it is distracting
we are distracting
you are distracting
they are distracting
Present Perfect
I have distracted
you have distracted
he/she/it has distracted
we have distracted
you have distracted
they have distracted
Past Continuous
I was distracting
you were distracting
he/she/it was distracting
we were distracting
you were distracting
they were distracting
Past Perfect
I had distracted
you had distracted
he/she/it had distracted
we had distracted
you had distracted
they had distracted
Future
I will distract
you will distract
he/she/it will distract
we will distract
you will distract
they will distract
Future Perfect
I will have distracted
you will have distracted
he/she/it will have distracted
we will have distracted
you will have distracted
they will have distracted
Future Continuous
I will be distracting
you will be distracting
he/she/it will be distracting
we will be distracting
you will be distracting
they will be distracting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been distracting
you have been distracting
he/she/it has been distracting
we have been distracting
you have been distracting
they have been distracting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been distracting
you will have been distracting
he/she/it will have been distracting
we will have been distracting
you will have been distracting
they will have been distracting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been distracting
you had been distracting
he/she/it had been distracting
we had been distracting
you had been distracting
they had been distracting
Conditional
I would distract
you would distract
he/she/it would distract
we would distract
you would distract
they would distract
Past Conditional
I would have distracted
you would have distracted
he/she/it would have distracted
we would have distracted
you would have distracted
they would have distracted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.distract - draw someone's attention away from something; "The thief distracted the bystanders"; "He deflected his competitors"
disconcert, flurry, confuse, put off - cause to feel embarrassment; "The constant attention of the young man confused her"
2.distract - disturb in mind or make uneasy or cause to be worried or alarmeddistract - disturb in mind or make uneasy or cause to be worried or alarmed; "She was rather perturbed by the news that her father was seriously ill"
vex, worry - disturb the peace of mind of; afflict with mental agitation or distress; "I cannot sleep--my daughter's health is worrying me"
disturb, trouble, upset - move deeply; "This book upset me"; "A troubling thought"

distract

verb
1. divert, sidetrack, draw away, turn aside, lead astray, draw or lead away from Video games sometimes distract him from his homework.
2. amuse, occupy, entertain, beguile, engross I took out a book and tried to distract myself.

distract

verb
To impair or destroy the composure of:
Informal: rattle.
Translations
يَشْغَلُيَصْرِفُ عَن، يُلْهي
rozptýlitrozptylovatvyrušovat
distrahere
häiritä
odvratiti pažnju
elvon
draga, leiîa frá
注意をそらす
산만하게 하다
apkvaišimasatitrauktasatitrauktiišblaškytiišprotėjęs
novērst
vyrušiť
zamotiti
distrahera
ทำให้ไขว้เขว
dikkatini dağıtmakilgisini başka yöne çekmek
làm sao lãng

distract

[dɪsˈtrækt] VT [+ person] to distract sb (from sth)distraer a algn (de algo)
to distract sb's attention (from sth)desviar la atención de algn (de algo)
she is easily distractedse distrae fácilmente

distract

[dɪˈstrækt] vt [+ person] → distraire, déranger
to distract sb from sth → détourner qn de qch
to distract sb's attention → distraire l'attention de qn

distract

vt
(= divert attention of)ablenken; to distract somebody’s attentionjdn ablenken
(old, = amuse) → zerstreuen, die Zeit vertreiben (+dat)

distract

[dɪsˈtrækt] vt (person) to distract sb (from sth)distrarre qn (da qc)
to distract sb's attention (from sth) → distrarre or sviare l'attenzione di qn (da qc)

distract

(diˈstrӕkt) verb
to draw aside (the mind or attention of). He was constantly being distracted from his work by the noisy conversation of his colleagues.
diˈstracted adjective
1. turned aside (from what one is doing or thinking). He had slipped out while her attention was distracted.
2. out of one's mind; mad. a distracted old woman.
3. distressed. The distracted mother couldn't reach her child in the burning house.
diˈstraction (-ʃən) noun
1. something that takes the mind off other especially more serious affairs. There are too many distractions here to allow one to work properly.
2. anxiety and confusion. in a state of complete distraction.

distract

يَشْغَلُ rozptýlit distrahere ablenken αποσπώ την προσοχή distraer häiritä distraire odvratiti pažnju distrarre 注意をそらす 산만하게 하다 afleiden distrahere oderwać distrair отвлекать distrahera ทำให้ไขว้เขว ilgisini başka yöne çekmek làm sao lãng 转移注意力

distract

v. distraer, interrumpir.
References in classic literature ?
There might have been cause for maternal anxiety, if Demi had not given convincing proofs that he was a true boy, as well as a budding philosopher, for often, after a discussion which caused Hannah to prophesy, with ominous nods, "That child ain't long for this world," he would turn about and set her fears at rest by some of the pranks with which dear, dirty, naughty little rascals distract and delight their parent's souls.
Yes, you may go, and you'd better run as far as you can out behind the barn, so 't your noise won't distract your aunt Mirandy.
That quiet mutual gaze of a trusting husband and wife is like the first moment of rest or refuge from a great weariness or a great danger--not to be interfered with by speech or action which would distract the sensations from the fresh enjoyment of repose.
But, God help me, I am old, and these foul onslaughts distract an aged man's brain.
And a loud hue-and-cry was raised in the newspapers against "high rates and monopoly" to distract the minds of the people from the real issue of legitimate business versus stock-company bubbles.
Whenever these happen, they lessen the respectability, weaken the authority, and distract the plans and operation of those whom they divide.
She planned amusements to distract Meriem's attention from her sorrow, and she instituted a well-designed campaign to impress upon the child the desirability of civilized life and customs.
Renfield seemed himself aware of having made a lapse, for he hurried on, as though to distract my attention from it, "I don't take any stock at all in such matters.
If I were a father and had a daughter, I believe I should love my daughter more than my sons, really," I began indirectly, as though talking of something else, to distract her attention.
Dantes observed, however, that Faria, in spite of the relief his society afforded, daily grew sadder; one thought seemed incessantly to harass and distract his mind.
For hours we would devise tricks to anger and distract him, for he looked extremely ridiculous when he was angry, and so diverted us the more (ashamed though I am now to admit it).