distraction


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dis·trac·tion

 (dĭ-străk′shən)
n.
1. The act of distracting, or the condition of being distracted: Inexperienced drivers are especially vulnerable to distraction. His distraction of the child worked well, and the child stopped crying.
2. Something that makes it difficult to pay attention or that draws attention away from familiar or everyday concerns: was annoyed by the distractions of having so many roommates; found that the shopping mall was always full of pleasant distractions.
3. Mental or emotional disturbance; agitation or confusion: loved the puppy to distraction; was driven to distraction by the noisy neighbors.

distraction

(dɪˈstrækʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of distracting or the state of being distracted
2. something that serves as a diversion or entertainment
3. an interruption; obstacle to concentration
4. (Psychology) mental turmoil or madness

dis•trac•tion

(dɪˈstræk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of distracting.
2. the state of being distracted.
3. mental distress or derangement.
4. a person or thing that prevents concentration.
5. something that amuses.
[1425–75; late Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin]
dis•trac′tive, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.distraction - mental turmoildistraction - mental turmoil; "he drives me to distraction"
confusedness, disarray, mental confusion, muddiness, confusion - a mental state characterized by a lack of clear and orderly thought and behavior; "a confusion of impressions"
2.distraction - an obstacle to attention
inattention - lack of attention
3.distraction - an entertainment that provokes pleased interest and distracts you from worries and vexationsdistraction - an entertainment that provokes pleased interest and distracts you from worries and vexations
entertainment, amusement - an activity that is diverting and that holds the attention
4.distraction - the act of distractingdistraction - the act of distracting; drawing someone's attention away from something; "conjurers are experts at misdirection"
revision, alteration - the act of revising or altering (involving reconsideration and modification); "it would require a drastic revision of his opinion"

distraction

noun
1. disturbance, interference, diversion, interruption Total concentration is required with no distractions.
2. entertainment, recreation, amusement, diversion, pastime, divertissement, beguilement every conceivable distraction from shows to bouncy castles
3. frenzy, madness, desperation, hysteria, mania, insanity, delirium, derangement A very clingy child can drive a parent to distraction.

distraction

noun
Something, especially a performance or show, designed to entertain:
Translations
تَلْهِيَه، إلْهاءقَلَق، خَبَل، إضطِراب
rozptýlenírozrušení
det at være drevet til vanvidforstyrrelsesindsforvirring
zaklatottságzavaró tényezõ
hugarangist, uppnámtruflun
rušivý moment
motnjarazvedrilo
dikkati dağıtan şeyşaşkınlık

distraction

[dɪsˈtrækʃən] N
1. (= interruption) → distracción f
2. (= entertainment) → diversión f
3. (= distress, anxiety) → aturdimiento m
to drive sb to distractionvolver loco a algn

distraction

[dɪˈstrækʃən] n
(from concentration)distraction f, dérangement m
to be a distraction from sth → détourner l'attention de qch
(= entertainment) → divertissement m
(= madness) to drive sb to distraction → rendre qn fou(folle)

distraction

n
no pl (= lack of attention)Unaufmerksamkeit f
(= interruption: from work etc) → Ablenkung f
(= entertainment)Zerstreuung f
(= anxiety)Ruhelosigkeit f, → Unruhe f; (= distraught state)Verstörung f; to love somebody to distractionjdn wahnsinnig lieben; to drive somebody to distractionjdn zum Wahnsinn or zur Verzweiflung treiben

distraction

[dɪsˈtrækʃn] n
a. (interruption) → distrazione f; (entertainment) → distrazione, diversivo
b. (distress, madness) to drive sb to distractionfar impazzire qn

distract

(diˈstrӕkt) verb
to draw aside (the mind or attention of). He was constantly being distracted from his work by the noisy conversation of his colleagues.
diˈstracted adjective
1. turned aside (from what one is doing or thinking). He had slipped out while her attention was distracted.
2. out of one's mind; mad. a distracted old woman.
3. distressed. The distracted mother couldn't reach her child in the burning house.
diˈstraction (-ʃən) noun
1. something that takes the mind off other especially more serious affairs. There are too many distractions here to allow one to work properly.
2. anxiety and confusion. in a state of complete distraction.

dis·trac·tion

n. distracción.
1. inhabilidad para concentrarse en una experiencia determinada;
2. separación de articulaciones sin dislocación.
References in classic literature ?
You are not only driving me to distraction but also ruining yourself with this eternal solicitude for your reputation.
On the contrary, he needed occupation and distraction quite apart from his love, so as to recruit and rest himself from the violent emotions that agitated him.
This is the day you have set apart to devote to this object, and perhaps in fulfilling this duty you may find some distraction from the melancholy to which, as I see to my sorrow, you are a prey.
And, indeed, I am not sorry to quit Paris; I had need of distraction.
Well, you will have distractions enough, gentlemen, be assured," said D'Artagnan.
Either of them are enough to drive any man to distraction," answered the old man.
The latter's distraction at his bereavement is a subject too painful to be dwelt on; its after-effects showed how deep the sorrow sunk.
It is true there be some affairs, which require extreme secrecy, which will hardly go beyond one or two persons, besides the king: neither are those counsels unprosperous; for, besides the secrecy, they conunonly go on constantly, in one spirit of direction, without distraction.
These distractions and distresses about the time have worried me so much that I was afraid my mind was so much affected that I never would have any appreciation of time again; but when I noticed how handy I was yet about comprehending when it was dinner-time, a blessed tranquillity settled down upon me, and I am tortured with doubts and fears no more.
It is impossible to read the history of the petty republics of Greece and Italy without feeling sensations of horror and disgust at the distractions with which they were continually agitated, and at the rapid succession of revolutions by which they were kept in a state of perpetual vibration between the extremes of tyranny and anarchy.
Its a distraction from a valid, important, and fact-based investigation into Russian interference in our election.
Curt's fascination with distraction is not simply professional.