distractor

(redirected from distractors)
Also found in: Medical.

dis·tract·er

also dis·trac·tor  (dĭ-străk′tər)
n.
One of the incorrect answers presented as a choice in a multiple-choice test.

distractor

(dɪsˈtræktə)
n
1. any of the incorrect choices in a multiple choice question
2. another spelling of distracter
Translations

distractor

[dɪsˈtræktər] n (in multiple choice question)réponse f piège (dans test de questions à choix multiples)
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas the pop-out search usually occurs when the target differs significantly from the distractors with similar features--such as color or orientation--serial searching usually occurs when the target differs from distractors by a conjunction of two or more basic features, or when the difference is very small (Treisman & Gelade, 1980; Treisman & Souther, 1985).
The prefrontal cortex plays a central role in the maintenance of working memory and the suppression of distractors.
The other 6 lists (3 high-BAS and 3 low-BAS lists) were employed as distractors on the recognition test.
5 cm response ports positioned 2 cm above the grid floor; each port was fitted with a light-emitting diode that served as the visual cue, an infrared beam to register nose pokes, and pneumatic inlet and vacuum outlet ports to introduce and remove air-based odor distractors.
Distractors assembly was connected and similarly ulno-metacarpal distractor also applied and the gradual distraction was started at 1 mm/day.
Distractors were obtained from eight DRM lists published by Alonso, Fernandez, Diez, and Beato (2004).
Answer options: the correct answer and a variable number of distractors
In Lyaan's case, we performed the Lefort III Osteotomy, where the mid-face was detached from the skull bone with application of rigid external distractors, also called RED Device, as part of the treatment on the patient," the doctor added.
First, anxiety leads to bad decisions when there are conflicting distractors present.
This seems intuitively appealing, but in his meta-analysis of 80 years of research into the ideal number of answer options that should be used Rodriguez (2005) actually found that adopting a three-option approach was optimal in most situations, so long as the two distractors were 'plausible'.