distressing


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dis·tress

 (dĭ-strĕs′)
tr.v. dis·tressed, dis·tress·ing, dis·tress·es
1. To cause strain, anxiety, or suffering to. See Synonyms at trouble.
2. To mar or otherwise treat (an object or fabric, for example) to give the appearance of an antique or of heavy prior use.
3. Archaic To constrain or overcome by harassment.
n.
1. Anxiety or mental suffering.
2.
a. Bodily dysfunction or discomfort caused by disease or injury: respiratory distress.
b. Physical deterioration, as of a highway, caused by hard use over time: pavement distress.
3.
a. The condition of being in need of immediate assistance: a motorist in distress.
b. Suffering caused by poverty: programs to relieve public distress.
4. Law The act of distraining or seizing goods to compel payment or other satisfaction for a debt or other duty owed; distraint.

[Middle English distressen, from Old French destresser, from destresse, constraint, from Vulgar Latin *districtia, from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere, to hinder; see distrain.]

dis·tress′ing·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.distressing - causing distress or worry or anxietydistressing - causing distress or worry or anxiety; "distressing (or disturbing) news"; "lived in heroic if something distressful isolation"; "a disturbing amount of crime"; "a revelation that was most perturbing"; "a new and troubling thought"; "in a particularly worrisome predicament"; "a worrying situation"; "a worrying time"
heavy - marked by great psychological weight; weighted down especially with sadness or troubles or weariness; "a heavy heart"; "a heavy schedule"; "heavy news"; "a heavy silence"; "heavy eyelids"
2.distressing - bad; unfortunate; "my finances were in a deplorable state"; "a lamentable decision"; "her clothes were in sad shape"; "a sorry state of affairs"
bad - having undesirable or negative qualities; "a bad report card"; "his sloppy appearance made a bad impression"; "a bad little boy"; "clothes in bad shape"; "a bad cut"; "bad luck"; "the news was very bad"; "the reviews were bad"; "the pay is bad"; "it was a bad light for reading"; "the movie was a bad choice"

distressing

adjective upsetting, worrying, disturbing, painful, affecting, sad, afflicting, harrowing, grievous, hurtful, lamentable, heart-breaking, nerve-racking, gut-wrenching, distressful the distressing symptoms of anxiety

distressing

adjective
Translations
مَكْروب، مَحْزون، مَغْموم
úzkostnýzarmucující
bekymrendeforuroligende
lesújtó
òjakandi; kvíîvænlegur
zarmucujúci
acı/ıstırap veren

distressing

[dɪsˈtresɪŋ] ADJ [situation, experience] → angustioso, doloroso; [poverty, inadequacy] → acuciante

distressing

[dɪˈstrɛsɪŋ] adj (= upsetting) [event, experience, sight, situation] → pénible, bouleversant(e); [symptoms, condition] → pénibledistress rocket nfusée f de détressedistress signal nsignal m de détresse

distressing

adj (= upsetting)besorgniserregend; (stronger) → erschreckend; (= regrettable)betrüblich

distressing

[dɪsˈtrɛsɪŋ] adjpenoso/a, doloroso/a

distress

(diˈstres) noun
1. great sorrow, trouble or pain. She was in great distress over his disappearance; Is your leg causing you any distress?; The loss of all their money left the family in acute distress.
2. a cause of sorrow. My inability to draw has always been a distress to me.
verb
to cause pain or sorrow to. I'm distressed by your lack of interest.
diˈstressing adjective
diˈstressingly adverb
References in classic literature ?
This was extremely distressing to the new settlers.
This was not such a very extravagant speech, either, for that burly Mannheim tenor's praises had been the talk of all Heidelberg for a week before his performance took place--yet his voice was like the distressing noise which a nail makes when you screech it across a window-pane.
Tom kept his ears open when idlers sauntered out of the court- room, but invariably heard distressing news -- the toils were closing more and more relentlessly around poor Potter.
If we feel for the wretched, enough to do all we can for them, the rest is empty sympathy, only distressing to ourselves.
Not so my companion: she ran back in terror, knelt down, and cried, and soothed, and entreated, till he grew quiet from lack of breath: by no means from compunction at distressing her.
If it was so, the conclusion that followed was a very distressing one.
Some intense associations of a most distressing nature were vividly recalled, I think.
The imagination of the author must be a child's imagination and yet maturely consistent, so that the White Queen in "Alice," for instance, is seen just as a child would see her, but she continues always herself through all her distressing adventures.