disturbing


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dis·turb

 (dĭ-stûrb′)
tr.v. dis·turbed, dis·turb·ing, dis·turbs
1. To break up or destroy the tranquility, order, or settled state of: "Subterranean fires and deep unrest disturb the whole area" (Rachel Carson).
2. To trouble emotionally or mentally; upset: It disturbed me when you left without saying goodbye.
3.
a. To interfere with; interrupt: noise that disturbed my sleep.
b. To intrude on; inconvenience: Constant calls disturbed her work.
4. Physics To alter or displace a region of (a medium) from its equilibrium state.

[Middle English distourben, from Old French destourber, from Latin disturbāre : Latin dis-, dis- + Latin turbāre, to agitate (from turba, confusion, probably from Greek turbē).]

dis·turb′er n.
dis·turb′ing·ly adv.

disturbing

(dɪˈstɜːbɪŋ)
adj
tending to upset or agitate; troubling; worrying
disˈturbingly adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disturbing - causing distress or worry or anxietydisturbing - causing distress or worry or anxiety; "distressing (or disturbing) news"; "lived in heroic if something distressful isolation"; "a disturbing amount of crime"; "a revelation that was most perturbing"; "a new and troubling thought"; "in a particularly worrisome predicament"; "a worrying situation"; "a worrying time"
heavy - marked by great psychological weight; weighted down especially with sadness or troubles or weariness; "a heavy heart"; "a heavy schedule"; "heavy news"; "a heavy silence"; "heavy eyelids"

disturbing

disturbing

adjective
Translations

disturbing

[dɪsˈtɜːbɪŋ] ADJ [influence, thought] → perturbador; [event] → inquietante, preocupante
it is disturbing thates inquietante que ...

disturbing

[dɪˈstɜːrbɪŋ] adj [experience] → troublant(e); [situation] → inquiétant(e); [news, trend] → inquiétant(e)

disturbing

adj (= alarming)beunruhigend; (= distracting)störend; some viewers may find these scenes disturbingeinige Zuschauer könnten an diesen Szenen Anstoß nehmen

disturbing

[dɪsˈtɜːbɪŋ] adjinquietante
References in classic literature ?
In the tops of the trees the wind began to play, disturbing the sleeping birds so that they flew about calling plaintively.
But the beginning of things, of a world especially, is necessarily vague, tangled, chaotic, and exceedingly disturbing.
The very slightness of the defense was its chief merit, for no one thought of disturbing a mass of brush, which all of them believed, in that moment of hurry and confusion, had been accidentally raised by the hands of their own party.
Their own remoteness and elevation above its feverish life kept them from the knowledge of much that was strange, and perhaps disturbing to their equanimity.
A doubt of this nature has a most disturbing influence, and, if shown to be a fact, comes with fearful and startling effect on minds of the trim, orderly, and limit-loving class, in which we find our little country-girl.
It is singular, however, how long a time often passes before words embody things; and with what security two persons, who choose to avoid a certain subject, may approach its very verge, and retire without disturbing it.
I was in receipt in these days of disturbing letters from home, where things were not going well.
So, almost every twenty-four hours, when the watches of the night were set, and the band on deck sentinelled the slumbers of the band below; and when if a rope was to be hauled upon the forecastle, the sailors flung it not rudely down, as by day, but with some cautiousness dropt it to its place, for fear of disturbing their slumbering shipmates; when this sort of steady quietude would begin to prevail, habitually, the silent steersman would watch the cabin-scuttle; and ere long the old man would emerge, griping at the iron banister, to help his crippled way.
So, it being calm weather, they broke out deeper and deeper, disturbing the slumbers of the huge ground-tier butts; and from that black midnight sending those gigantic moles into the daylight above.
In one of them was a woman, in foul rags, who sat on the ground, and would not answer a question or speak a word, but only looked up at us once or twice, through a cobweb of tangled hair, as if to see what casual thing it might be that was disturbing with sound and light the meaningless dull dream that was become her life; after that, she sat bowed, with her dirt-caked fingers idly interlocked in her lap, and gave no further sign.
Occasionally, a name was followed simply by the remark, "II days, for disturbing the peace," and without comment upon the justice or injustice of the sentence.
Disturbing thoughts began to chase each other through his head.