disunionist

dis·un·ion·ist

 (dĭs-yo͞on′yə-nĭst)
n.
An advocate of disunion, especially a secessionist during the US Civil War.

disunionist

(dɪsˈjuːnjənɪst)
n
a supporter of disunion
References in periodicals archive ?
37) Whitman's "Apostroph" certainly offers a strong indictment against disunionist causes.
Americans properly associate disunionist sentiment with the South, the Confederacy, and slavery.
Unable to go forward with the Maine expedition, the administration took steps to ensure that New England Republicans would not be intimidated by their Federalist opponents into supporting disunionist measures (Stagg 1983, 477-78).
The Louisiana Spectator observed, "Except an occasional Carolinian, there [is] not a disunionist in Louisiana.
No paper engagements" could secure the connection of East and West, Massachusetts congressman Rufus King wrote in 1786, and separatist movements and disunionist plots kept such concerns alive in subsequent years.
I have been a Disunionist for two years; but, as there seems to be no way of making a peaceable separation without giving up everything, I am glad, for the credit of the country, that they will probably act now with some firmness.
Calhoun not only faced more nationalist sentiment from the North and West, but also more extreme disunionist sentiment from the South.
418) This was one of Douglass's most powerful articulations of his disunionist constitutional theory.
Crittenden attacked Breckinridge as a disunionist, a man led astray by "fire-eaters" (rabid secessionists) such as Alabama's William Yancey.
Resisting "despair or despondency" despite widespread disunionist sentiment, he admitted "there are Appearances of danger which excite serious apprehensions of lasting Evils.
Jackson was forced to fend off widespread attacks as a "nullifier," a once-democratic hallmark now linked to the Calhoun camp and thus condemned as being disunionist.