ditch


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ditch

 (dĭch)
n.
A long narrow trench or furrow dug in the ground, as for irrigation, drainage, or a boundary line.
v. ditched, ditch·ing, ditch·es
v.tr.
1. To dig or make a long narrow trench or furrow in.
2. To surround with a long narrow trench or furrow.
3.
a. To drive (a vehicle) into a long narrow trench, as one beside a road.
b. To derail (a train).
4. Slang
a. To get rid of; discard: ditched the old yard furniture.
b. To get away from (a person, especially a companion).
c. To discontinue use of or association with: ditch the job at the hamburger stand.
d. To skip (class or school).
5. To crash-land (an aircraft) on water.
v.intr.
1. To dig a ditch.
2. To crash-land in water. Used of an aircraft or a pilot.

[Middle English dich, from Old English dīc; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots.]

ditch

(dɪtʃ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a narrow channel dug in the earth, usually used for drainage, irrigation, or as a boundary marker
2. (Physical Geography) any small, natural waterway
3. (Physical Geography) Irish a bank made of earth excavated from and placed alongside a drain or stream
4. (Bowls & Bowling) informal either of the gutters at the side of a tenpin bowling lane
5. last ditch a last resort or place of last defence
vb
6. to make a ditch or ditches in (a piece of ground)
7. (intr) to edge (something) with a ditch
8. informal to crash or be crashed, esp deliberately, as to avoid more unpleasant circumstances: he had to ditch the car.
9. (tr) slang to abandon or discard: to ditch a girlfriend.
10. (Aeronautics) informal to land (an aircraft) on water in an emergency
11. (tr) slang US to evade: to ditch the police.
[Old English dīc; related to Old Saxon dīk, Old Norse dīki, Middle High German tīch dyke, pond, Latin fīgere to stick, see dyke1]
ˈditcher n
ˈditchless adj

Ditch

(dɪtʃ)
n
(Placename) the Ditch an informal name for the Tasman Sea

ditch

(dɪtʃ)

n.
1. a long, narrow excavation in the ground, as for drainage or irrigation; trench.
2. any natural channel or waterway.
v.t.
3. to dig a ditch in or around.
4. to derail or drive into a ditch.
5. to crash-land on water and abandon (an aircraft).
6. Slang.
a. to get rid of.
b. to escape from.
v.i.
7. to dig a ditch.
8. (of an aircraft or its crew) to crash-land on water.
[before 900; Middle English dich, Old English dīc, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon dīk ditch, dike, Middle High German tīch, Old Norse dīki]

ditch


Past participle: ditched
Gerund: ditching

Imperative
ditch
ditch
Present
I ditch
you ditch
he/she/it ditches
we ditch
you ditch
they ditch
Preterite
I ditched
you ditched
he/she/it ditched
we ditched
you ditched
they ditched
Present Continuous
I am ditching
you are ditching
he/she/it is ditching
we are ditching
you are ditching
they are ditching
Present Perfect
I have ditched
you have ditched
he/she/it has ditched
we have ditched
you have ditched
they have ditched
Past Continuous
I was ditching
you were ditching
he/she/it was ditching
we were ditching
you were ditching
they were ditching
Past Perfect
I had ditched
you had ditched
he/she/it had ditched
we had ditched
you had ditched
they had ditched
Future
I will ditch
you will ditch
he/she/it will ditch
we will ditch
you will ditch
they will ditch
Future Perfect
I will have ditched
you will have ditched
he/she/it will have ditched
we will have ditched
you will have ditched
they will have ditched
Future Continuous
I will be ditching
you will be ditching
he/she/it will be ditching
we will be ditching
you will be ditching
they will be ditching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ditching
you have been ditching
he/she/it has been ditching
we have been ditching
you have been ditching
they have been ditching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ditching
you will have been ditching
he/she/it will have been ditching
we will have been ditching
you will have been ditching
they will have been ditching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ditching
you had been ditching
he/she/it had been ditching
we had been ditching
you had been ditching
they had been ditching
Conditional
I would ditch
you would ditch
he/she/it would ditch
we would ditch
you would ditch
they would ditch
Past Conditional
I would have ditched
you would have ditched
he/she/it would have ditched
we would have ditched
you would have ditched
they would have ditched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ditch - a long narrow excavation in the earthditch - a long narrow excavation in the earth
drainage ditch - a ditch for carrying off excess water or sewage
excavation - a hole in the ground made by excavating
irrigation ditch - a ditch to supply dry land with water artificially
sunk fence, ha-ha, haw-haw - a ditch with one side being a retaining wall; used to divide lands without defacing the landscape
trench - a ditch dug as a fortification having a parapet of the excavated earth
trench - any long ditch cut in the ground
2.ditch - any small natural waterway
waterway - a navigable body of water
Verb1.ditch - forsake; "ditch a lover"
desert, desolate, forsake, abandon - leave someone who needs or counts on you; leave in the lurch; "The mother deserted her children"
2.ditch - throw away; "Chuck these old notes"
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
abandon - forsake, leave behind; "We abandoned the old car in the empty parking lot"
3.ditch - sever all ties with, usually unceremoniously or irresponsibly; "The company dumped him after many years of service"; "She dumped her boyfriend when she fell in love with a rich man"
get rid of, remove - dispose of; "Get rid of these old shoes!"; "The company got rid of all the dead wood"
4.ditch - make an emergency landing on water
air travel, aviation, air - travel via aircraft; "air travel involves too much waiting in airports"; "if you've time to spare go by air"
crash land - make an emergency landing
5.ditch - crash or crash-land; "ditch a car"; "ditch a plane"
crash - cause to crash; "The terrorists crashed the plane into the palace"; "Mother crashed the motorbike into the lamppost"
6.ditch - cut a trench in, as for drainageditch - cut a trench in, as for drainage; "ditch the land to drain it"; "trench the fields"
hollow, excavate, dig - remove the inner part or the core of; "the mining company wants to excavate the hillside"

ditch

noun
1. channel, drain, trench, gutter, dyke, trough, furrow, gully, conduit, moat, watercourse The car went out of control and ended up in a ditch.
verb
1. (Slang) get rid of, dump (informal), scrap, bin (informal), junk (informal), chuck (informal), discard, dispose of, dispense with, jettison, cast off, throw out or overboard I decided to ditch the sofa bed.
2. (Slang) leave, drop, abandon, desert, dump (informal), axe (informal), get rid of, bin (informal), chuck (informal), finish with, walk out on, forsake, jilt, give someone the push, give someone the elbow, give someone the big E (slang) I can't bring myself to ditch him.

ditch

verb
Slang. To let go or get rid of as being useless or defective, for example:
Informal: chuck, jettison, shuck (off).
Translations
خَنْدَقيَتَخَلَّص مِنيَتْرُكُ
zbavit sepříkopstrouha
grøftskrottedroppe
hylätälintsataoja
jaraknasipodbacitirov
ároksáncvizesárok
losa sig viîskurîur
捨てる
버리다수로
griovys
atstātgrāvispamest
jarekgrapa
dikegöra sig av med
คูน้ำทิ้ง
hendeksepetlemekbaşından atmak
bỏmương

ditch

[dɪtʃ]
A. N (gen) → zanja f; (at roadside) → cuneta f; (= irrigation channel) → acequia f; (as defence) → foso m
B. VT (= get rid of) [+ car] → deshacerse de; [+ person] → dejar plantado
to ditch a planehacer un amaraje forzoso

ditch

[ˈdɪtʃ]
nfossé m
see also last-ditch drainage ditch, irrigation ditch
vt
(= throw out) [+ object] → balancer
(= abandon) [+ plan, policy] → laisser tomber, abandonner
[+ boyfriend, girlfriend] → plaquer
She's just ditched her boyfriend → Elle vient de plaquer son copain.

ditch

n
Graben m
(Aviat inf) → Bach m (sl)
vt (inf: = get rid of) personabhängen (inf); employee, boyfriendabservieren (inf); plan, projectbaden gehen lassen (inf); carstehen lassen; old manuscript, unwanted objectwegschmeißen (inf); to ditch a planeeine Maschine im Bach landen (sl)
vi (Aviat inf) → in den Bach gehen

ditch

[dɪtʃ]
1. nfosso; (irrigation channel) → fosso or canale m d'irrigazione
2. vt (fam) (get rid of, car) → abbandonare, mollare; (person) → piantare

ditch

(ditʃ) noun
a long narrow hollow dug in the ground especially one to drain water from a field, road etc. He climbed over the fence and fell into a ditch.
verb
to get rid of. The stolen car had been ditched by the thieves several miles away.

ditch

خَنْدَق, يَتْرُكُ strouha, zbavit se grøft, skrotte abservieren, Graben ξεφορτώνομαι, χαντάκι cuneta, desechar, zanja hylätä, oja abandonner, fossé jarak, odbaciti disfarsi, fosso 捨てる, 溝 버리다, 수로 afdanken, sloot grøft, kvitte (seg) med rów, zarzucić fosso, livrar-se de выбрасывать, кювет dike, göra sig av med คูน้ำ, ทิ้ง hendek, sepetlemek bỏ, mương 小沟, 抛弃
References in classic literature ?
Two of the sweeping bastions appeared to rest on the water which washed their bases, while a deep ditch and extensive morasses guarded its other sides and angles.
When I've built that there reservoir on Devil's Spur, and bring the water over the ridge from Union Ditch, there'll be enough to spare for that.
And that man intends to put a girdling ditch round the whole in the course of forty months, and so redeem it by the magic of his spade.
The dynamite had dug a ditch more than a hundred feet wide, all around us, and cast up an embankment some twenty-five feet high on both borders of it.
I saw the water streaming over the road towards the ditch, and it reminded me of Uncle Tom's Cabin at Milltown, when Eliza took her baby and ran across the Mississippi on the ice blocks, pursued by the bloodhounds.
She then broke the lace off short, and dexterously throwing it into a ditch, was presently obliged to entreat them to stop, and acknowledged her inability to put herself to rights so as to be able to walk home in tolerable comfort.
And you do not lie dead in some ditch under some stream?
Deep ditch, single drawbridge, massive stone walls, eight great towers, cannon, muskets, fire and smoke.
A sluggish ditch deposited its mud at the prison walls.
Making my way along here with all despatch, I had just crossed a ditch which I knew to be very near the Battery, and had just scrambled up the mound beyond the ditch, when I saw the man sitting before me.
One day as he was returning from the well, he stumbled against the step of the stile, and his brown pot, falling with force against the stones that overarched the ditch below him, was broken in three pieces.
A deep fosse, or ditch, was drawn round the whole building, and filled with water from a neighbouring stream.