dithionite


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di·thi·o·nite

 (dī-thī′ə-nīt′)
n.
The divalent anionic group S2O4, derived from dithionous acid, or a compound containing this group. Also called hydrosulfite.

dithionite

(daɪˈθaɪəˌnaɪt)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any salt of dithionous acid. Also called: hyposulphite or hydrosulphite
References in periodicals archive ?
One such chemical is sodium dithionite, which decomposes into sulfate and sulfite which can corrode equipment and pipes in dye mills and wastewater treatment plants.
Sodium Dithionite, Rongalite, and Thiourea Oxides: Chemistry and Application
Approximately 2-3g sodium dithionite was added to the content of the sample cuvette which reduces cytochrome b5.
nitro and nitrito), imidazole, two forms of phenol (neutral and anionic), and water - related to an unexpected range of electronic structures detectable in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of a water-soluble copper porphyrin with water, nitrite, imidazole, dithionite, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6- sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and guaiacol.
Western blotting detection kit, primary antibody anti-CYP 2E1, 3A4, 2C23, 1A1, and 2B1/2, and anti-rabbit secondary antibody were purchased from ABCAM[R] pharmaceuticals Ponceau S stain; benzo (a) pyrene, ethoxycoumarin, cytochrome c, sodium dithionite, and all other chemicals were obtained from Sigma Chemical Co.
1960, Iron oxide removal from soils and clays by a dithionite citrate system with sodium bicarbonate.
2] in Egyptian kaolinite were reduced chemically via sodium dithionite from 0.
What this project focused on was the use of neutral dithionite solutions to reverse the centuries of corrosion, so it is instructive to review the electrochemistry of this reducing agent.
Removel of outer covering at 38 OC within 3 hours using an artificial intestinal fluid comprising trypsin pancreatin sodium bicarbonate and sodium dithionite has been achieved experimentally (Kuzmina et al.
The iron can be extracted using a sodium dithionite citrate-bicarbonate solution, commonly referred to as high crystallinity (Fed) in literature (VENDRAME et al.