ditty


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dit·ty

 (dĭt′ē)
n. pl. dit·ties
A simple song.

[Middle English dite, a literary composition, from Old French dite, from Latin dictātum, thing dictated, from neuter past participle of dictāre, to dictate, frequentative of dīcere, to say; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

ditty

(ˈdɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Poetry) a short simple song or poem
2. (Music, other) a short simple song or poem
[C13: from Old French ditie poem, from ditier to compose, from Latin dictāre dictate]

dit•ty

(ˈdɪt i)

n., pl. -ties.
a short, simple song.
[1250–1300; < Old French dit(i)e poem, n. use of past participle of ditier to compose < Latin dictāre]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ditty - a short simple song (or the words of a poem intended to be sung)
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
Translations
أُغْنِيَه صَغيرَه ``طَقْطوقَه''
popěvek
vise
dalocska
vísa; lagstúfur
dainelė
dziesmiņa
kısa/basit şarkı

ditty

[ˈdɪtɪ] Ncancioncilla f

ditty

[ˈdɪti] n (= short song) → chansonnette f

ditty

nLiedchen nt, → Weise f

ditty

[ˈdɪtɪ] ncanzoncina

ditty

(ˈditi) plural ˈditties noun
a simple little song.
References in classic literature ?
I understand it, that the song be in quire, placed aloft, and accompanied with some broken music; and the ditty fitted to the device.
Again, a young girl, more bold and saucy than was fitting, brushed the priest's black robe, singing in his face the sardonic ditty, "niche, niche, the devil is caught.
And so saying, he reached the harp, and entertained his guest with the following characteristic song, to a sort of derry-down chorus, appropriate to an old English ditty.
From the molten-golden notes, And all in tune, What a liquid ditty floats To the turtle-dove that listens, while she gloats On the moon
Methinks I have heard somewhat of it," said Robin; "but ne'ertheless strike up thy ditty and let us hear it, for, as I do remember me, it is a gallant song; so out with it, good fellow.
Yea, truly," quoth Robin Hood, when the Tanner had made an end of singing, "it is as I remember it, a fair ditty, and a ballad with a pleasing tune of a song.
They were a regular series of thumpings from the interior of the house, occasioned by the violent rocking of a cradle upon a stone floor, to which movement a feminine voice kept time by singing, in a vigorous gallopade, the favourite ditty of "The Spotted Cow"--
And I thought it was a ditty rather too dolefully appropriate for a company that had met such cruel losses in the morning.
I was surprised into crooning this ditty as I pushed her over the floor.
When Gryphus, therefore, came to see his prisoner in the morning, he no longer found him morose and lying in bed, but standing at the window, and singing a little ditty.
Not knowing what might be the consequences of irritating her friend, and trembling with the fear of doing so, poor Nell sang him some little ditty which she had learned in happier times, and which was so agreeable to his ear, that on its conclusion he in the same peremptory manner requested to be favoured with another, to which he was so obliging as to roar a chorus to no particular tune, and with no words at all, but which amply made up in its amazing energy for its deficiency in other respects.
But at the close of the ditty, Rebecca quitted the piano, and giving her hand to Amelia, walked away into the front drawing-room twilight; and, at this moment, Mr.