diurnal


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to diurnal: diurnal tide, diurnal enuresis

di·ur·nal

 (dī-ûr′nəl)
adj.
1. Relating to or occurring in a 24-hour period; daily.
2. Occurring or active during the daytime rather than at night: diurnal animals.
3. Botany Opening during daylight hours and closing at night.
n.
1. A book containing all the offices for the daily canonical hours of prayer except matins.
2. Archaic
a. A diary or journal.
b. A daily newspaper.

[Middle English, from Late Latin diurnālis, from Latin diurnus, from diēs, day; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

di·ur′nal·ly adv.

diurnal

(daɪˈɜːnəl)
adj
1. happening during the day or daily
2. (Botany) (of flowers) open during the day and closed at night
3. (Zoology) (of animals) active during the day. Compare nocturnal
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a service book containing all the canonical hours except matins
[C15: from Late Latin diurnālis, from Latin diurnus, from diēs day]
diˈurnally adv

di•ur•nal

(daɪˈɜr nl)

adj.
1. occurring each day; daily.
2. of or belonging to the daytime.
3. occurring in daily cycles: the apparent diurnal motion of celestial bodies.
4. active by day, as certain birds and insects (opposed to nocturnal).
5. opening by day and closing by night, as certain flowers.
n.
6. Archaic. diary.
7. Archaic. newspaper.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin diurnālis <diurn(us) daily]
di•ur′nal•ly, adv.

di·ur·nal

(dī-ûr′nəl)
1. Occurring in a 24-hour period; daily.
2. Most active during the daytime. Many animals, including the apes, are diurnal. Compare nocturnal.
3. Having leaves or flowers that open in daylight and close at night. The morning glory and crocus are diurnal.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.diurnal - of or belonging to or active during the day; "diurnal animals are active during the day"; "diurnal flowers are open during the day and closed at night"; "diurnal and nocturnal offices"
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
nocturnal - belonging to or active during the night; "nocturnal animals are active at night"; "nocturnal plants have flowers that open at night and close by day"
2.diurnal - having a daily cycle or occurring every day; "diurnal rotation of the heavens"
periodic, periodical - happening or recurring at regular intervals; "the periodic appearance of the seventeen-year locust"

diurnal

adjective
1. daytime, active during the day, non-nocturnal Kangaroos are diurnal animals
2. daily, regular, everyday, circadian, quotidian the diurnal life of monasteries
Translations
denní
avaavadiurnaalinenjokapäiväinenkukkapäivä
napinappali

diurnal

[daɪˈɜːnl] ADJdiurno

diurnal

[daɪˈɜːrnəl] adj (formal)diurne

diurnal

adj (liter: = of the daytime) → Tages-; the earth’s diurnal rotationdie tägliche Umdrehung der Erde
n (Eccl) → Diurnal(e) nt
References in classic literature ?
But, besides these cold, formal, and empty words of the chisel that inscribes, the voice that speaks, and the pen that writes, for the public eye and for distant time,--and which inevitably lose much of their truth and freedom by the fatal consciousness of so doing,--there were traditions about the ancestor, and private diurnal gossip about the Judge, remarkably accordant in their testimony.
She had his companionship no longer; I esteemed it a duty to supply its lack, as much as possible, with mine: an inefficient substitute; for I could only spare two or three hours, from my numerous diurnal occupations, to follow her footsteps, and then my society was obviously less desirable than his.
There was an astronomer, who had undertaken to place a sun-dial upon the great weathercock on the town-house, by adjusting the annual and diurnal motions of the earth and sun, so as to answer and coincide with all accidental turnings of the wind.
Thus he never failed to pay his diurnal court to her; and the self-satisfied Gascon was convinced that sooner or later she could not fail to respond.
There is an abstruse astrologer that saith, If it were not for two things that are constant (the one is, that the fixed stars ever stand a like distance one from another, and never come nearer together, nor go further asunder; the other, that the diurnal motion perpetually keepeth time), no individual would last one moment.
During the day the animals obsequiously followed the shadow of the smallest tree as it moved round the stem with the diurnal roll; and when the milkers came they could hardly stand still for the flies.
I disliked the abstruse studies of my new profession; but I absolutely hated the diurnal slavery of qualifying myself, in a social point of view, for future success in it.
Nevertheless, as he lived in a spacious house in Golden Square, which, in addition to a brass plate upon the street-door, had another brass plate two sizes and a half smaller upon the left hand door-post, surrounding a brass model of an infant's fist grasping a fragment of a skewer, and displaying the word 'Office,' it was clear that Mr Ralph Nickleby did, or pretended to do, business of some kind; and the fact, if it required any further circumstantial evidence, was abundantly demonstrated by the diurnal attendance, between the hours of half- past nine and five, of a sallow-faced man in rusty brown, who sat upon an uncommonly hard stool in a species of butler's pantry at the end of the passage, and always had a pen behind his ear when he answered the bell.
The Birgos is diurnal in its habits; but every night it is said to pay a visit to the sea, no doubt for the purpose of moistening its branchiae.
The diurnal jungle has its own aspect--its own lights and shades, its own birds, its own blooms, its own beasts; its noises are the noises of the day.
I am abroad at night, my good girl, because the earth in its diurnal revolutions leaves the light of the sun but half the time on any given meridian, and because what I have to do cannot be performed in twelve or fifteen consecutive hours.
No chance-child was he, for he could trace his genealogy all the way back to his parents, who lived hard by; his mother being a washerwoman, and his father a drunken soldier, discharged with a wooden leg, and a diurnal pension of twopence-halfpenny and an unstateable fraction.