divaricate

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di·var·i·cate

 (dī-văr′ĭ-kāt′, dĭ-)
intr.v. di·var·i·cat·ed, di·var·i·cat·ing, di·var·i·cates
To diverge at a wide angle; spread apart.
adj. (dī-văr′ə-kĭt, -kāt′, dĭ-)
1. Biology Branching or spreading widely from a point or axis, as the branches of a tree or shrub; diverging.
2. Relating to a separation of two bones normally adjacent or attached but not located in a joint; distatic.

[Latin dīvāricāre, dīvāricāt- : dī, dis-, dis- + vāricāre, to straddle (from vārus, bent).]

di·var′i·cate′ly adv.

divaricate

vb
(Botany) (intr) (esp of branches) to diverge at a wide angle
adj
branching widely; forked
[C17: from Latin dīvāricāre to stretch apart, from di-2 + vāricāre to stand astride]
diˈvaricately adv
diˈvariˌcatingly adv
diˌvariˈcation n

di•var•i•cate

(v. daɪˈvær ɪˌkeɪt, dɪ-; adj. -kɪt, -ˌkeɪt)

v. -cat•ed, -cat•ing,
adj. v.i.
1. to spread apart; branch; diverge.
adj.
2. spread apart; widely divergent.
[1615–25; < Latin dīvāricātus, past participle of dīvāricāre to cause to straddle =dī- di-2 + vāricāre to straddle; see prevaricate]
di•var′i•cat`ing•ly, adv.
di•var`i•ca′tion, n.
di•var′i•ca`tor, n.

divaricate


Past participle: divaricated
Gerund: divaricating

Imperative
divaricate
divaricate
Present
I divaricate
you divaricate
he/she/it divaricates
we divaricate
you divaricate
they divaricate
Preterite
I divaricated
you divaricated
he/she/it divaricated
we divaricated
you divaricated
they divaricated
Present Continuous
I am divaricating
you are divaricating
he/she/it is divaricating
we are divaricating
you are divaricating
they are divaricating
Present Perfect
I have divaricated
you have divaricated
he/she/it has divaricated
we have divaricated
you have divaricated
they have divaricated
Past Continuous
I was divaricating
you were divaricating
he/she/it was divaricating
we were divaricating
you were divaricating
they were divaricating
Past Perfect
I had divaricated
you had divaricated
he/she/it had divaricated
we had divaricated
you had divaricated
they had divaricated
Future
I will divaricate
you will divaricate
he/she/it will divaricate
we will divaricate
you will divaricate
they will divaricate
Future Perfect
I will have divaricated
you will have divaricated
he/she/it will have divaricated
we will have divaricated
you will have divaricated
they will have divaricated
Future Continuous
I will be divaricating
you will be divaricating
he/she/it will be divaricating
we will be divaricating
you will be divaricating
they will be divaricating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been divaricating
you have been divaricating
he/she/it has been divaricating
we have been divaricating
you have been divaricating
they have been divaricating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been divaricating
you will have been divaricating
he/she/it will have been divaricating
we will have been divaricating
you will have been divaricating
they will have been divaricating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been divaricating
you had been divaricating
he/she/it had been divaricating
we had been divaricating
you had been divaricating
they had been divaricating
Conditional
I would divaricate
you would divaricate
he/she/it would divaricate
we would divaricate
you would divaricate
they would divaricate
Past Conditional
I would have divaricated
you would have divaricated
he/she/it would have divaricated
we would have divaricated
you would have divaricated
they would have divaricated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.divaricate - branch off; "The road divaricates here"
diverge - extend in a different direction; "The lines start to diverge here"; "Their interests diverged"
2.divaricate - spread apart; "divaricate one's fingers"
spread, unfold, open, spread out - spread out or open from a closed or folded state; "open the map"; "spread your arms"
References in periodicals archive ?
History can produce new lines of continuity, but in doing so, it absorbs the new, if not into the heaviness of the past of tradition, then into the light divarications of Walter Benjamin's redemptive histories that fork off from empty time like flashes of lightning.
The book's first essay, David Loewenstein's "Writing and the Persecution of Heretics in Henry VIII's England: The Examinations of Anne Askew," immediately focuses several key issues in the ongoing heresy debates: the gender issue, for example, was to continue to divide even radical Protestants; the Eucharistic controversy for which Askew was martyred was one of the central religious divarications about the sign/the signified in biblical language and its different reception in Catholic and Protestant belief; while the 1539 proclamation Loewenstein cites recognized the subversive potential of the private study of scripture for both church and state.
For while they may imagine themselves as a community, we can hear their divarications.