dive


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dive 1

 (dīv)
v. dived or dove (dōv), dived, div·ing, dives
v.intr.
1.
a. To plunge, especially headfirst, into water.
b. To execute a dive in athletic competition.
c. To participate in the sport of competitive diving.
2.
a. To go toward the bottom of a body of water: We dove down to check the anchor.
b. To engage in the sport of scuba diving.
c. To submerge under power. Used of a submarine.
3.
a. To fall head down through the air.
b. To descend nose down at an acceleration usually exceeding that of free fall. Used of an airplane.
c. To engage in the sport of skydiving.
4. To drop sharply and rapidly; plummet: Stock prices dove 100 points in a single day of trading.
5.
a. To rush headlong and vanish into something: The fugitive dove into the crowd and escaped.
b. To plunge one's hand into something: dove into the cookie jar.
6. To lunge or leap headfirst: dove for the loose ball.
7. To plunge into an activity or enterprise with vigor and gusto.
8. Sports To exaggerate a fall in an attempt to induce a referee to call a penalty on an opponent.
v.tr.
1. To cause (an aircraft, for example) to dive.
2. To go scuba-diving to or along: We dove that reef last week.
n.
1.
a. A plunge into water, especially done headfirst and in a way established for athletic competition.
b. The act or an instance of going under water, as of a submarine or a skin diver.
c. A nearly vertical descent at an accelerated speed through the air.
2. A rapid or abrupt decrease: Stock prices took a dive.
3.
a. Slang A disreputable or run-down bar or nightclub.
b. A run-down residence.
4. Sports
a. A knockout feigned by a prizefighter: The challenger took a dive.
b. An exaggerated fall, especially by a hockey player, intended to draw a penalty against an opponent.
5.
a. A lunge or a headlong jump: made a dive to catch the falling teacup.
b. Football An offensive play in which the carrier of the ball plunges into the opposing line in order to gain short yardage.

[Middle English diven, from Old English dȳfan, to dip, and from dūfan, to sink; see dheub- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Either dove or dived is acceptable as the past tense of dive. In our 2008 survey 92 percent of the Usage Panel accepted dove and 72 percent accepted dived in the sentence. Keeping their New Year's Day tradition, the L Street Brownies dove/dived into Dorchester Bay this morning. This may seem odd considering that dived is actually the older form. In fact, the emergence of dove runs against the general tendency of change in English verb forms. Old English had two classes of verbs: strong verbs, whose past tense was indicated by a change in their vowel (a process that survives in such present-day English verbs as drive/drove and fling/flung); and weak verbs, whose past was formed with a suffix related to -ed in Modern English (as in present-day English live/lived and move/moved). Dive comes from one of these weak verbs. Since the Old English period, many verbs have changed from the strong pattern to the weak one; for example, the past tense of step, formerly stop, became stepped. Over the years, in fact, the weak pattern has become so prevalent that we use the term regular to refer to verbs that form their past tense by suffixation of -ed. However, there have occasionally been changes in the other direction: the past tense of wear, now wore, was once werede, and that of spit, now spat, was once spitede. The development of dove is an additional example of the small group of verbs that have swum against the historical tide.

di·ve 2

 (dē′vā)
n.
A plural of diva.

dive

(daɪv)
vb (mainly intr) , dives, diving or dived, dove or dived
1. to plunge headfirst into water
2. (Nautical Terms) (of a submarine, swimmer, etc) to submerge under water
3. (Aeronautics) (also tr) to fly (an aircraft) in a steep nose-down descending path, or (of an aircraft) to fly in such a path
4. to rush, go, or reach quickly, as in a headlong plunge: he dived for the ball.
5. (also tr; foll by in or into) to dip or put (one's hand) quickly or forcefully (into): to dive into one's pocket.
6. (usually foll by: in or into) to involve oneself (in something), as in eating food
7. (Soccer) soccer slang (of a footballer) to pretend to have been tripped or impeded by an opposing player in order to win a free kick or penalty
n
8. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) a headlong plunge into water, esp one of several formalized movements executed as a sport
9. (Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) an act or instance of diving
10. (Nautical Terms) an act or instance of diving
11. (Aeronautics) a steep nose-down descent of an aircraft
12. slang a disreputable or seedy bar or club
13. (Boxing) boxing slang the act of a boxer pretending to be knocked down or out: he took a dive in the fourth round.
14. (Soccer) soccer slang the act of a player pretending to have been tripped or impeded
[Old English dӯfan; related to Old Norse dӯfa to dip, Frisian dīvi; see deep, dip]

dive

(daɪv)

v. dived dove, dived, div•ing, v.i.
1. to plunge into water, esp. headfirst.
2. to submerge, as a submarine.
3. to plunge, fall, or descend through the air, into the earth, etc.: The acrobats dived into nets.
4. (of an airplane) to descend rapidly.
5. to penetrate suddenly into something, as with the hand: to dive into one's purse.
6. to dart: to dive into a doorway.
7. to enter deeply or plunge into a subject, activity, etc.
v.t.
8. to cause to plunge, submerge, or descend.
n.
9. an act or instance of diving.
10. a jump or plunge into water, esp. in a prescribed way from a diving board.
11. the steep, rapid descent of an airplane at a speed far exceeding that in level flight.
12. a submerging, as of a submarine or skindiver.
13. a dash, plunge, or lunge, as if throwing oneself at or into something.
14. a sudden or sharp decline, as in stock prices.
15. Informal. a dingy or disreputable bar or nightclub.
16. (in boxing) a false show of being knocked out, usu. in a bout whose result has been prearranged.
[before 900; Middle English: to dive, dip, Old English dȳfan to dip]
usage: Both dived and dove are standard as the past tense of dive. dived, the older form, is somewhat more common in edited writing, but dove occurs there so frequently that it also must be considered standard. dove is an Americanism that probably developed by analogy with alternations like drive, drove and ride, rode. It is the more common form in speech in the northern U.S. and in Canada, and its use seems to be spreading. The past participle of dive is always dived.

dive

If you dive, you jump head-first into water with your arms straight above your head.

He taught me to swim and dive and water-ski.

You also use dive to say that someone jumps or rushes in a particular direction.

You can dive off left into St James's Place.

In British English, the past tense for both senses of 'dive' is dived. In American English, it is dived or dove (/dəʊv/).

She dived into the water and swam away.
I dove right in after her.
The cashier dived for cover when a gunman opened fire.
Many survivors, though dazed, immediately dove into the debris to free the injured.

dive


Past participle: dived
Gerund: diving

Imperative
dive
dive
Present
I dive
you dive
he/she/it dives
we dive
you dive
they dive
Preterite
I dived
you dived
he/she/it dived
we dived
you dived
they dived
Present Continuous
I am diving
you are diving
he/she/it is diving
we are diving
you are diving
they are diving
Present Perfect
I have dived
you have dived
he/she/it has dived
we have dived
you have dived
they have dived
Past Continuous
I was diving
you were diving
he/she/it was diving
we were diving
you were diving
they were diving
Past Perfect
I had dived
you had dived
he/she/it had dived
we had dived
you had dived
they had dived
Future
I will dive
you will dive
he/she/it will dive
we will dive
you will dive
they will dive
Future Perfect
I will have dived
you will have dived
he/she/it will have dived
we will have dived
you will have dived
they will have dived
Future Continuous
I will be diving
you will be diving
he/she/it will be diving
we will be diving
you will be diving
they will be diving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been diving
you have been diving
he/she/it has been diving
we have been diving
you have been diving
they have been diving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been diving
you will have been diving
he/she/it will have been diving
we will have been diving
you will have been diving
they will have been diving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been diving
you had been diving
he/she/it had been diving
we had been diving
you had been diving
they had been diving
Conditional
I would dive
you would dive
he/she/it would dive
we would dive
you would dive
they would dive
Past Conditional
I would have dived
you would have dived
he/she/it would have dived
we would have dived
you would have dived
they would have dived
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dive - a cheap disreputable nightclub or dance hall
cabaret, night club, nightclub, nightspot, club - a spot that is open late at night and that provides entertainment (as singers or dancers) as well as dancing and food and drink; "don't expect a good meal at a cabaret"; "the gossip columnist got his information by visiting nightclubs every night"; "he played the drums at a jazz club"
2.dive - a headlong plunge into water
swim, swimming - the act of swimming; "it was the swimming they enjoyed most": "they took a short swim in the pool"
belly flop, belly flopper, belly whop, belly whopper - a dive in which the abdomen bears the main force of impact with the water
cliff diving - diving into the water from a steep overhanging cliff
flip - a dive in which the diver somersaults before entering the water
full gainer, gainer - a dive in which the diver throws the feet forward to complete a full backward somersault and enters the water feet first and facing away from the diving board
half gainer - a dive in which the diver throws the feet forward and up to complete a half backward somersault and enters the water facing the diving board
jackknife - a dive in which the diver bends to touch the ankles before straightening out
swallow dive, swan dive - a dive in which the diver arches the back with arms outstretched before entering the water
3.dive - a steep nose-down descent by an aircraft
descent - the act of changing your location in a downward direction
power dive - a dive of an airplane that is accelerated both by gravity and by the power of the engine
Verb1.dive - drop steeply; "the stock market plunged"
power-dive - make a power dive; "The airplane power-dived"
nosedive - plunge nose first; drop with the nose or front first, of aircraft
duck - submerge or plunge suddenly
crash-dive - descend steeply and rapidly
chute, parachute, jump - jump from an airplane and descend with a parachute
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"
dump, plunge - fall abruptly; "It plunged to the bottom of the well"
2.dive - plunge into water; "I was afraid to dive from the board into the pool"
aquatics, water sport - sports that involve bodies of water
belly-flop - dive so that one hits the water with one's belly
jackknife - dive into the water bending the body at the waist at a right angle, like a jackknife
submerge, submerse - sink below the surface; go under or as if under water
3.dive - swim under water; "the children enjoyed diving and looking for shells"
swim - travel through water; "We had to swim for 20 minutes to reach the shore"; "a big fish was swimming in the tank"
skin-dive - swim underwater with no breathing apparatus other than a snorkel
snorkel - dive with a snorkel

dive

verb
1. plunge, drop, jump, pitch, leap, duck, dip, descend, plummet He tried to escape by diving into a river.
2. go underwater, snorkel, scuba-dive, submerge, swim under water They are diving to collect marine organisms.
3. nose-dive, fall, plunge, crash, pitch, swoop, plummet His monoplane stalled and dived into the ground.
4. leap, jump, dash, bolt, dart, lunge, scurry, throw yourself They dived into a taxi.
noun
1. plunge, spring, jump, leap, dash, header (informal), swoop, lunge, nose dive He made a sudden dive for his legs.
2. (Slang) sleazy bar, joint (slang), nightclub, honky-tonk (U.S. slang), drinking den, drinking joint We've played in all the dives about here.

dive

verb
1. To move or thrust at, under, or into the midst of with sudden force:
lunge, plunge, wade in (or into).
2. To undergo a sharp, rapid descent in value or price:
Idiom: take a sudden downtrend.
noun
1. The act of plunging suddenly downward into or as if into water:
Informal: header.
2. A sudden involuntary drop to the ground:
Informal: header.
3. A usually swift downward trend, as in prices:
4. Slang. A disreputable or run-down bar or restaurant:
Slang: honky-tonk, joint.
Translations
غاصغطسغَطْسغَوْصَه، غَطْسَهيَخْتَفي فَجْأَةً وبِسُرْعَه
skočit do vodyskočit střemhlavskokskok do vodyzapadnout
dykkedykningforsvinde hovedkulshovedspringudspring
sukellussukeltaa
ronitiskok u vodu
búvárkodik
dÿfa, dÿfingskjótaststinga sér
飛び込む潜る飛び込み
다이빙다이빙하다
gelsvai žalia spalvageltonkraštė dūsianarasnėrimas į vandenįsmukti
niršananirtpēkšņi nozust
skočiť strmhlav
potopiti seskočiti
dykafilmadyk
การดำน้ำดำน้ำ
dalışdalmakçabucak gözden kaybolmak
lao đầu xuống nướcsự lặn

dive

[daɪv]
A. N
1. (into water) → salto m de cabeza (al agua), zambullida f, clavado m (CAm, Mex); (by professional diver, of submarine) → inmersión f
2. (Aer) → picado m, picada f (LAm)
3. (= leap) to make a dive for sthlanzarse or abalanzarse sobre algo
4. (Ftbl) → estirada f
to take a dive (Ftbl) → tirarse a la piscina (dejarse caer deliberadamente con la intención de conseguir un tiro libre o un penalty)
5. (fig) (= fall) his reputation has taken a divesu reputación ha caído en picado
6. (pej) (= club etc) → garito m
B. VI
1. [swimmer] → tirarse, zambullirse, dar un clavado (CAm, Mex), clavarse (CAm, Mex); (artistically) → saltar; (underwater) → bucear; [submarine] → sumergirse
the kids were diving for coinslos niños se tiraban al agua para recoger monedas
to dive for pearlsbuscar perlas
to dive into the watertirarse al agua, zambullirse
2. (Aer) → bajar en picado
3. (= leap) the goalkeeper dived for the ballel portero se lanzó a parar el balón
to dive for coverprecipitarse en busca de cobijo
he dived for the exitse precipitó hacia la salida
he dived into the crowdse metió entre la muchedumbre
to dive into one's pocketmeter la mano en el bolsillo
to dive into a barentrar a toda prisa en un bar
I dived into the shop for a paperpasé corriendo por la tienda a por un periódico, me metí corriendo a la tienda a por un periódico
4. (= fall) [prices etc] → bajar de golpe, caer en picado or (LAm) picada

dive

[ˈdaɪv]
n
[swimmer, bird] → plongeon m
[deep-sea diver] → plongée f
[submarine] → plongée f
[plane] → piqué m
(pejorative) (= café, bar) → bouge m
[footballer] → chiqué m
to take a dive → faire du chiqué
vi
[swimmer, bird] → plonger
to dive in [swimmer] → faire un plongeon
to dive into sth [+ river, sea] → plonger dans qch, se jeter dans qch
to dive down → plonger
to dive off sth [+ rock, cliff, diving board] → plonger de qch, plonger du haut de qch
[deep-sea diver] → plonger
(= move quickly) → foncer
to dive into sth (= leap) → sauter dans qch
to dive for cover (= dash) → se précipiter pour se mettre à l'abri
to dive into sth (= plunge hand into) [+ bag, drawer] → plonger la main dans qchdive-bomb [ˈdaɪvbɒm] vt [plane] [+ area, city] → bombarder en piquédive bomber dive-bomber [ˈdaɪvbɒmər] n (= plane) → bombardier m

dive

vb: pret <dived or (US) dove>, ptp <dived>
n
(by swimmer) → Sprung m; (by plane) → Sturzflug m; (Ftbl) → Hechtsprung m; divers are only allowed to make two dives a dayTaucher dürfen nur zweimal am Tag unter Wasser; that was the deepest dive yetdas war die bisher größte Tauchtiefe; to make a dive for something (fig inf)sich auf etw (acc)stürzen; to take a dive (inf) (pound, dollar etc)absacken (inf); (confidence, hopes)sich in nichts auflösen; (Ftbl) → eine Schwalbe machen (sl)
(pej inf: = club etc) → Spelunke f (inf); dive bar (esp US inf) → Schmuddelkneipe f
vi
(person, from diving board) → springen; (from side of lake, pool etc) → (mit dem Kopf voraus) springen, hechten; (under water) → tauchen; (submarine)untertauchen; (plane)einen Sturzflug machen; (birds, from air) → einen Sturzflug machen; (in water) → tauchen; (prices)stürzen; to dive for pearlsnach Perlen tauchen; the goalkeeper dived for the ballder Torwart hechtete nach dem Ball; dive! (Naut) → auf Tauchstation!
(inf) he dived into the crowder tauchte in der Menge unter; he dived under the tableer verschwand blitzschnell unter dem Tisch; to dive for covereilig in Deckung gehen; he dived into a taxier stürzte (sich) in ein Taxi; he dived into his bager fischte eilig in seiner Tasche

dive

:
dive-bomb
dive bomber
nSturzkampfbomber m, → Stuka m
dive bombing
nSturzkampfbombardierung f

dive

[daɪv]
1. n
a. (of swimmer, goalkeeper) → tuffo; (of submarine) → immersione f (Aer) → picchiata
b. (pej, fam) (club etc) → bettola, buco
2. vi
a. (swimmer) to dive (into)tuffarsi (in); (submarine) → immergersi (Aer) → scendere in picchiata (Ftbl) → tuffarsi
b. (fam) (move quickly) to dive into (doorway, hole) → buttarsi dentro; (car, taxi) → saltare su
he dived into the crowd → si tuffò or si lanciò tra la folla
he dived for cover → si è buttato al riparo
he dived for the exit → si è lanciato or precipitato verso l'uscita

dive

(daiv) verb
1. to plunge headfirst into water or down through the air. He dived off a rock into the sea.
2. to go quickly and suddenly out of sight. She dived down a back street and into a shop.
noun
an act of diving. She did a beautiful dive into the deep end of the pool.
ˈdiver noun
a person who dives, especially one who works under water using special breathing equipment.
ˈdiving-board noun
a platform from which to dive, erected beside a swimming-pool.
great diving beetle
a water insect that carries a bubble of air under its wing cover for breathing when it is under water.

dive

غَطْس, يَغْطِسُ skočit do vody, skok do vody dykke, dykning Kopfsprung, tauchen βουτιά, βουτώ salto, zambullida, zambullirse sukellus, sukeltaa plongeon, plonger roniti, skok u vodu tuffarsi, tuffo 飛び込み, 飛び込む 다이빙, 다이빙하다 duik, duiken stup, stupe skok do wody, zanurkować mergulhar, mergulho нырять, прыжки в воду dyk, dyka การดำน้ำ, ดำน้ำ dalış, dalmak lao đầu xuống nước, sự lặn 跳水
References in classic literature ?
I hadn't the least idea of selling my hair at first, but as I went along I kept thinking what I could do, and feeling as if I'd like to dive into some of the rich stores and help myself.
But in my time a little Eyetalian tried the high dive, and it turned out different with him.
here come more crowds, pacing straight for the water, and seemingly bound for a dive.
The new address was a cellar dive, whose proprietor said that he had never heard of Duane; but after he had put Jurgis through a catechism he showed him a back stairs which led to a "fence" in the rear of a pawnbroker's shop, and thence to a number of assignation rooms, in one of which Duane was hiding.
Sam, with frantic ejaculations, made a dive at the reins, but only succeeded in brushing the blazing palm-leaf afore-named into the horse's eyes, which by no means tended to allay the confusion of his nerves.
Those banks of beautiful ladies, shining in their barbaric splendors, would see a knight sprawl from his horse in the lists with a lance- shaft the thickness of your ankle clean through him and the blood spouting, and instead of fainting they would clap their hands and crowd each other for a better view; only sometimes one would dive into her handkerchief, and look ostentatiously broken-hearted, and then you could lay two to one that there was a scandal there somewhere and she was afraid the public hadn't found it out.
Chambers could dive without inconvenience, and was fond of doing it.
He bent his head a little towards me, and with a single hasty glance seemed to dive into my eyes.
The scaling him with chairs for ladders to dive into his pockets, despoil him of brown-paper parcels, hold on tight by his cravat, hug him round his neck, pommel his back, and kick his legs in irrepressible affection.
Sometimes in his rage he would take me for one of them, and come at me, mouthing as if he were going to tear me in pieces; then, remembering me, just in time, would dive into the shop, and lie upon his bed, as I thought from the sound of his voice, yelling in a frantic way, to his own windy tune, the 'Death of Nelson'; with an Oh
My sister made a dive at me, and fished me up by the hair: saying nothing more than the awful words, "You come along and be dosed.
And every once in a while, when the top of her head got too hot, she would dive under the ship and come up on the other side.