diverge

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di·verge

 (dĭ-vûrj′, dī-)
v. di·verged, di·verg·ing, di·verg·es
v.intr.
1. To go or extend in different directions from a common point; branch out: "All modern species diverged from a set of ancestors" (Jennifer Ackerman).
2.
a. To depart from an established pattern or norm; deviate.
b. To be different, as in opinion or manner; differ: Opinions diverged within the government on how to deal with the crisis. See Synonyms at swerve.
3. Mathematics To fail to approach a limit.
v.tr.
To cause (light rays, for example) to diverge; deflect.

[Latin dīvergere : Latin dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + Latin vergere, to bend; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

diverge

(daɪˈvɜːdʒ)
vb
1. to separate or cause to separate and go in different directions from a point
2. (intr) to be at variance; differ: our opinions diverge.
3. (intr) to deviate from a prescribed course
4. (Mathematics) (intr) maths (of a series or sequence) to have no limit
[C17: from Medieval Latin dīvergere, from Latin di-2 + vergere to turn]

di•verge

(dɪˈvɜrdʒ, daɪ-)

v. -verged, -verg•ing. v.i.
1. to move, lie, or extend in different directions from a common point; branch off.
2. to differ in opinion, character, form, etc.; deviate.
3. Math. (of a sequence, series, etc.) to have no unique limit.
4. to turn aside or deviate, as from a path, practice, or plan.
v.t.
5. to deflect.
[1655–65; < Medieval Latin dīvergere= Latin dī- di-2 + vergere to incline]
syn: See deviate.

diverge


Past participle: diverged
Gerund: diverging

Imperative
diverge
diverge
Present
I diverge
you diverge
he/she/it diverges
we diverge
you diverge
they diverge
Preterite
I diverged
you diverged
he/she/it diverged
we diverged
you diverged
they diverged
Present Continuous
I am diverging
you are diverging
he/she/it is diverging
we are diverging
you are diverging
they are diverging
Present Perfect
I have diverged
you have diverged
he/she/it has diverged
we have diverged
you have diverged
they have diverged
Past Continuous
I was diverging
you were diverging
he/she/it was diverging
we were diverging
you were diverging
they were diverging
Past Perfect
I had diverged
you had diverged
he/she/it had diverged
we had diverged
you had diverged
they had diverged
Future
I will diverge
you will diverge
he/she/it will diverge
we will diverge
you will diverge
they will diverge
Future Perfect
I will have diverged
you will have diverged
he/she/it will have diverged
we will have diverged
you will have diverged
they will have diverged
Future Continuous
I will be diverging
you will be diverging
he/she/it will be diverging
we will be diverging
you will be diverging
they will be diverging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been diverging
you have been diverging
he/she/it has been diverging
we have been diverging
you have been diverging
they have been diverging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been diverging
you will have been diverging
he/she/it will have been diverging
we will have been diverging
you will have been diverging
they will have been diverging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been diverging
you had been diverging
he/she/it had been diverging
we had been diverging
you had been diverging
they had been diverging
Conditional
I would diverge
you would diverge
he/she/it would diverge
we would diverge
you would diverge
they would diverge
Past Conditional
I would have diverged
you would have diverged
he/she/it would have diverged
we would have diverged
you would have diverged
they would have diverged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.diverge - move or draw apart; "The two paths diverge here"
furcate, branch, fork, ramify, separate - divide into two or more branches so as to form a fork; "The road forks"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
converge - move or draw together at a certain location; "The crowd converged on the movie star"
2.diverge - have no limits as a mathematical series
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"
converge, meet - be adjacent or come together; "The lines converge at this point"
converge - approach a limit as the number of terms increases without limit
3.diverge - extend in a different direction; "The lines start to diverge here"; "Their interests diverged"
divaricate - branch off; "The road divaricates here"
bifurcate - split or divide into two
converge, meet - be adjacent or come together; "The lines converge at this point"
4.diverge - be at variance withdiverge - be at variance with; be out of line with
aberrate - diverge or deviate from the straight path; produce aberration; "The surfaces of the concave lens may be proportioned so as to aberrate exactly equal to the convex lens"
aberrate - diverge from the expected; "The President aberrated from being a perfect gentleman"
belie, contradict, negate - be in contradiction with
differ - be different; "These two tests differ in only one respect"

diverge

verb
1. separate, part, split, branch, divide, fork, divaricate The aims of the partners began to diverge.
2. conflict, differ, disagree, dissent, be at odds, be at variance Theory and practice sometimes diverged.
3. deviate, depart, stray, wander, meander, turn aside a course that diverged from the coastline
4. digress, stray, deviate, digress, ramble, get sidetracked, go off at a tangent, get off the point The manuscripts diverged from the original.

diverge

verb
1. To separate into branches or branchlike parts:
2. To be unlike or dissimilar:
Idiom: be at variance.
3. To turn away from a prescribed course of action or conduct:
Archaic: err.
4. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
Translations
يَتَباعَديَنْفَصِل، يَتَفَرَّع
rozbíhat serozcházet se
divergereforgrene siggå i hver sin retning
greinastvera ólíkur
išsiskyrimasnesutampantis
atšķirtiesnesakristnovirzīties
rozbiehať sarozchádzať sa
ayrılmakfarklı olmak

diverge

[daɪˈvɜːdʒ] VI [roads] → bifurcarse (fig) [opinions] → divergir (from de)

diverge

[daɪˈvɜːrdʒ] vi
[roads] → s'écarter
(= become different) [interests, aims] → diverger; [economies] → diverger
to diverge from sth → diverger de qch

diverge

viabweichen (from von), divergieren (geh, Math); (two things)voneinander abweichen

diverge

[daɪˈvɜːdʒ] vidivergere

diverge

(daiˈvəːdʒ) verb
1. to separate and go in different directions. The roads diverge three kilometres further on.
2. to differ (from someone or something else); to go away (from a standard). This is where our opinions diverge.
diˈvergence noun
diˈvergent adjective
References in classic literature ?
After ten thousand generations, species (A) is supposed to have produced three forms, a10, f10, and m10, which, from having diverged in character during the successive generations, will have come to differ largely, but perhaps unequally, from each other and from their common parent.
Of the eight descendants from (A) the three marked a14, q14, p14, will be nearly related from having recently branched off from a10; b14 and f14, from having diverged at an earlier period from a5, will be in some degree distinct from the three first-named species; and lastly, o14, e14, and m14, will be nearly related one to the other, but from having diverged at the first commencement of the process of modification, will be widely different from the other five species, and may constitute a sub-genus or even a distinct genus.
It is worth while to reflect for a moment on the character of the new species F14, which is supposed not to have diverged much in character, but to have retained the form of (F), either unaltered or altered only in a slight degree.
We shall, when we come to our chapter on Geology, have to refer again to this subject, and I think we shall then see that the diagram throws light on the affinities of extinct beings, which, though generally belonging to the same orders, or families, or genera, with those now living, yet are often, in some degree, intermediate in character between existing groups; and we can understand this fact, for the extinct species lived at very ancient epochs when the branching lines of descent had diverged less.
Poetry now diverged in two directions, according to the individual character of the writers.
Soon the two ships diverged their wakes; and long as the strange vessel was in view, she was seen to yaw hither and thither at every dark spot, however small, on the sea.
Presently I came to a place where five corridors diverged from a common point.
They were more than a yard in length, and diverged in an ascending direction from the orifices.
They crossed the stream, and ascended by the little rocky pass to the hills beyond; then diverged to the left, and returned by a cross-road which led through the village of Combe-Raven.
Scientists on a six-week expedition to the far reaches of North Russia found a fragment of a rib bone from a Siberian wolf that suggests dogs diverged from wolves 27,000 to 40,000 years ago--far earlier than once believed.
It is found in the benchmark for four methods, the proposed method has better convergence than the other three methods which may be diverged in high fault resistances.
In his The Descent of Man and Selection in Relations to Sex (1871), he proposed that only late in their development humans and chimps diverged considerably to become sufficiently distinct from each other, and hence they must have had an ancient common ancestor.