diversion


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di·ver·sion

 (dĭ-vûr′zhən, dī-)
n.
1. The act or an instance of diverting or turning aside; deviation.
2. Something that distracts the mind and relaxes or entertains.
3. A maneuver that draws the attention of an opponent away from a planned point of action, especially as part of military strategy.
4. A policy or practice permitting a juvenile to be removed from traditional processing in juvenile court and placed in a program involving an alternative disposition, such as treatment or rehabilitation services.

[Late Latin dīversiō, dīversiōn-, act of turning aside, from Latin dīversus, past participle of dīvertere, to divert; see divert.]

di·ver′sion·ar′y adj.

diversion

(daɪˈvɜːʃən)
n
1. the act of diverting from a specified course
2. (Navigation) chiefly Brit an official detour used by traffic when a main route is closed
3. something that distracts from business, etc; amusement
4. (Military) military a feint attack designed to draw an enemy away from the main attack
diˈversional, diˈversionary adj

di•ver•sion

(dɪˈvɜr ʒən, -ʃən, daɪ-)

n.
1. the act of diverting or turning aside, as from a course or purpose.
2. a channel made to divert the flow of water from one course to another or to direct the flow of water draining from a piece of ground.
3. Brit. a detour on a highway or road.
4. distraction from business, care, etc.; recreation; a pastime.
5. a military feint intended to draw off attention from the point of main attack.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin dīversiō < Latin dīvert(ere) to divert]

diversion

1. The act of drawing the attention and forces of an enemy from the point of the principal operation; an attack, alarm, or feint that diverts attention.
2. A change made in a prescribed route for operational or tactical reasons. A diversion order will not constitute a change of destination.
3. A rerouting of cargo or passengers to a new transshipment point or destination or on a different mode of transportation prior to arrival at ultimate destination.
4. In naval mine warfare, a route or channel bypassing a dangerous area. A diversion may connect one channel to another or it may branch from a channel and rejoin it on the other side of the danger. See also demonstration.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diversion - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulatesdiversion - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
antic, prank, put-on, joke, trick, caper - a ludicrous or grotesque act done for fun and amusement
bathing - immersing the body in water or sunshine
festivity, celebration - any joyous diversion
dancing, terpsichore, dance, saltation - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
entertainment, amusement - an activity that is diverting and that holds the attention
escapade, lark - any carefree episode
escapism, escape - an inclination to retreat from unpleasant realities through diversion or fantasy; "romantic novels were her escape from the stress of daily life"; "his alcohol problem was a form of escapism"
eurhythmics, eurhythmy, eurythmics, eurythmy - the interpretation in harmonious bodily movements of the rhythm of musical compositions; used to teach musical understanding
fun, merriment, playfulness - activities that are enjoyable or amusing; "I do it for the fun of it"; "he is fun to have around"
gambling, gaming, play - the act of playing for stakes in the hope of winning (including the payment of a price for a chance to win a prize); "his gambling cost him a fortune"; "there was heavy play at the blackjack table"
game - an amusement or pastime; "they played word games"; "he thought of his painting as a game that filled his empty time"; "his life was all fun and games"
jest, joke, jocularity - activity characterized by good humor
night life, nightlife - the activity of people seeking nighttime diversion (as at the theater, a nightclub, etc.); "a futile search for intelligent nightlife"; "in the summer the nightlife shifts to the dance clubs"
pastime, pursuit, interest - a diversion that occupies one's time and thoughts (usually pleasantly); "sailing is her favorite pastime"; "his main pastime is gambling"; "he counts reading among his interests"; "they criticized the boy for his limited pursuits"
child's play, play - activity by children that is guided more by imagination than by fixed rules; "Freud believed in the utility of play to a small child"
frolic, gambol, romp, caper, play - gay or light-hearted recreational activity for diversion or amusement; "it was all done in play"; "their frolic in the surf threatened to become ugly"
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
2.diversion - a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern); "a diversion from the main highway"; "a digression into irrelevant details"; "a deflection from his goal"
turning, turn - the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course; "he took a turn to the right"
red herring - any diversion intended to distract attention from the main issue
3.diversion - an attack calculated to draw enemy defense away from the point of the principal attack
diversionary landing - an amphibious diversionary attack
attack, onrush, onset, onslaught - (military) an offensive against an enemy (using weapons); "the attack began at dawn"

diversion

noun
1. distraction, deviation, deflection, digression The whole argument is a diversion.
3. (Chiefly Brit.) detour, deviation, circuitous route, roundabout way, indirect course They turned back because of traffic diversions.
4. (Chiefly Brit.) deviation, change, departure, variation, straying, divergence, digression a diversion from his fantasy-themed movies

diversion

noun
1. A departing from what is prescribed:
2. Activity engaged in for relaxation and amusement:
3. Something, especially a performance or show, designed to entertain:
Translations
اِنْحِرافتَحْويلتَسْلِيَهتَغيير إتِّجاه
objížďkazábavaodklonodvrácenírozptýlení
afledningsmanøvreomkørselunderholdningadspredelse
kiertotieharhautusharrastus
preusmjeravanje prometa
elterelésterelõút
beining í aîra áttleiîa athygli burt frá e-uskemmtun, afòreying
迂回路
전환
dėmesio nukreipimaseismo nukreipimas kitu keliu
atzarojumsizklaidenovēršananovirzīšanās
odvrátenie
omläggning
ทางเบี่ยง
đường vòng

diversion

[daɪˈvɜːʃən] N
1. (Brit) [of traffic] → desviación f, desvío m
"Diversion" (road sign) → Desvío
2. (= distraction) to create a diversion (gen) → distraer (Mil) → producir una diversión
3. (= pastime) → diversión f

diversion

[daɪˈvɜːrʃən] n
(British) (= changed route) → déviation f
(= distraction) → diversion f
to create a diversion → faire diversion
(= redirection) [money] → détournement m; [ship, vehicle] → détournement m

diversion

n
(of traffic, stream)Umleitung f
(= relaxation)Unterhaltung f; for diversionzur Unterhaltung or Zerstreuung; it’s a diversion from workes ist eine angenehme Abwechslung von der Arbeit
(Mil, fig: = sth that distracts attention) → Ablenkung f; to create a diversionablenken; as a diversionum abzulenken

diversion

[daɪˈvɜːʃn] n (Brit) (Aut) → deviazione f; (of river) → diversione; (distraction) → divertimento; (old) (pastime) → diversivo, distrazione f
to create a diversion → creare un'azione diversiva

diversion

(daiˈvəːʃən) , ((American) -ʒən) noun
1. an alteration to a traffic route. There's a diversion at the end of the road.
2. (an act of) diverting attention.
3. (an) amusement.

diversion

اِنْحِراف objížďka afledningsmanøvre Umleitung παρεκτροπή desvío kiertotie déviation preusmjeravanje prometa deviazione 迂回路 전환 omleiding avledning zmiana kierunku jazdy desvio объезд omläggning ทางเบี่ยง mecburi yön đường vòng 转向

diversion

n derivación f; — program (US) programa alterno, programa que ofrece una alternativa a una práctica dañina (como uso de drogas, prostitución, etc.) generalmente ordenadado por el tribunal; drug — desvío or desviación f de drogas; urinary — derivación urinaria
References in classic literature ?
In the evening I used to prowl about, hunting for diversion.
As their stay at Grand Isle drew near its close, she felt that she could not give too much time to a diversion which afforded her the only real pleasurable moments that she knew.
Duncan, who was not altogether as easy under this nice estimate of distances as his companions, was glad to find, however, that owing to their superior dexterity, and the diversion among their enemies, they were very sensibly obtaining the advantage.
But as my little conductress, with her hair of gold and her frock of blue, danced before me round corners and pattered down passages, I had the view of a castle of romance inhabited by a rosy sprite, such a place as would somehow, for diversion of the young idea, take all color out of storybooks and fairytales.
It may seem strange that of all men sailors should be tinkering at their last wills and testaments, but there are no people in the world more fond of that diversion.
Lord and master over all this scene, the captain stood erect on the ship's elevated quarter-deck, so that the whole rejoicing drama was full before him, and seemed merely contrived for his own individual diversion.
Because the sounds she made set his blood to running cold and his lips to quivering in spite of himself, he was glad of the diversion when Teta Elzbieta, pale with fright, opened the door and rushed in; yet he turned upon her with an oath.
So much are people the slave of their eye and ear, that many of the servants really thought that Missis was the principal sufferer in the case, especially as Marie began to have hysterical spasms, and sent for the doctor, and at last declared herself dying; and, in the running and scampering, and bringing up hot bottles, and heating of flannels, and chafing, and fussing, that ensued, there was quite a diversion.
I immediately tried to get up a diversion about Swiss scenery, to keep her from launching into topics that might betray that I did not know her, but it was of no use, she went right along upon matters which interested her more:
They're in considerable trouble down there, and they think you and Huck'll be a kind of diversion for them--'comfort,' they say.
A favorite diversion was to make the house into a fort, gallantly held by a handful of American soldiers against a besieging force of the British army.
A minute previously she was violent; now, supported on one arm, and not noticing my refusal to obey her, she seemed to find childish diversion in pulling the feathers from the rents she had just made, and ranging them on the sheet according to their different species: her mind had strayed to other associations.