divineness


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Related to divineness: deific

di·vine

 (dĭ-vīn′)
adj. di·vin·er, di·vin·est
1.
a. Having the nature of or being a deity.
b. Of, relating to, emanating from, or being the expression of a deity: sought divine guidance through meditation.
c. Being in the service or worship of a deity; sacred.
2. Superhuman; godlike.
3.
a. Supremely good or beautiful; magnificent: a divine performance of the concerto.
b. Extremely pleasant; delightful: had a divine time at the ball.
n.
1. A cleric.
2. A theologian.
v. di·vined, di·vin·ing, di·vines
v.tr.
1. To foretell, especially by divination. See Synonyms at foretell.
2. To guess or know by inspiration or intuition: somehow divined the answer despite not having read the assignment.
3. To locate (underground water or minerals) with a divining rod; douse.
v.intr.
1. To practice divination.
2. To guess.

[Middle English, from Old French devine, from Latin dīvīnus, divine, foreseeing, from dīvus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots. V., Middle English divinen, from Old French deviner, from Latin dīvīnāre, from dīvīnus.]

di·vine′ly adv.
di·vine′ness n.
di·vin′er n.
References in classic literature ?
Nor can it be questioned from what stands on legendary record of this noble horse, that it was his spiritual whiteness chiefly, which so clothed him with divineness; and that this divineness had that in it which, though commanding worship, at the same time enforced a certain nameless terror.
Beyond this universality of the symbolic language, we are apprised of the divineness of this superior use of things, whereby the world is a temple whose walls are covered with emblems, pictures, and commandments of the Deity,--in this, that there is no fact in nature which does not carry the whole sense of nature; and the distinctions which we make in events and in affairs, of low and high, honest and base, disappear when nature is used as a symbol.
And yet, when after some resistance he had consented to take the Casaubons to his friend's studio, he had been allured by the gratification of his pride in being the person who could grant Naumann such an opportunity of studying her loveliness--or rather her divineness, for the ordinary phrases which might apply to mere bodily prettiness were not applicable to her.