divisive


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di·vi·sive

 (dĭ-vī′sĭv, -vĭs′-ĭv)
adj.
Creating dissension or discord.

di·vi′sive·ly adv.
di·vi′sive·ness n.
Usage Note: The word divisive is usually pronounced in both American and British English as (dĭ-vī′sĭv), with the stressed syllable having a long i. This was the preferred pronunciation of 88 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2013 ballot. The pronunciation with a short i in the stressed syllable, rhyming with permissive, was acceptable to only 16 percent of the Panel in 2001 but has made inroads since then, to the point where it was deemed acceptable by 65 percent of the Panel in 2013. The long-i pronunciation conforms to the regular rules for pronouncing English spelling, which call for a long vowel before a consonant-vowel sequence (as in decisive, derisive, and incisive) and a short vowel before a doubled consonant (as in missive and permissive). Though still less favored than the pronunciation with a long i, the pronunciation with a short i is on the path to becoming an established variant pronunciation in American English.

divisive

(dɪˈvaɪsɪv)
adj
1. causing or tending to cause disagreement or dissension
2. archaic having the quality of distinguishing
diˈvisively adv
diˈvisiveness n

di•vi•sive

(dɪˈvaɪ sɪv)

adj.
1. forming or expressing division or distribution.
2. creating dissension or discord.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin]
di•vi′sive•ly, adv.
di•vi′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.divisive - dissenting (especially dissenting with the majority opinion)
discordant - not in agreement or harmony; "views discordant with present-day ideas"

divisive

adjective disruptive, unsettling, alienating, troublesome, controversial, contentious Abortion has always been a divisive issue.
Translations

divisive

[dɪˈvaɪsɪv] ADJdivisivo, causante de divisiones

divisive

[dɪˈvaɪsɪv] adj [issue] → qui divise l'opinion, qui crée des dissensions
to be divisive → diviser l'opinion

divisive

adj issue, figurekontrovers, umstritten; influence, effectpolarisierend; to be divisiveUneinigkeit schaffen; a divisive general electioneine Wahl, die das Land in zwei Lager spaltet

divisive

[dɪˈvaɪsɪv] adjche causa discordia
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Cameron's official spokeswoman said: "The Prime Minister completely disagrees with the comments made by Donald Trump, which are divisive, unhelpful and quite simply wrong.
The divisive former Tory prime minister gained 28 per cent of votes, four more than scientist Curie, the physicist and chemist who carried out pioneering research on radioactivity.
He had come to Bihar with an agenda for development, but later resorted to divisive tactics.
Summary: Iraq's new President Fouad Massoum has taken the courageous step of passing over divisive Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki in a bid to see a new, inclusive government tackle an Islamist-led insurgency.
She accused the daily of running divisive stories regarding the polls.
New Delhi, July 17 ( ANI ): Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP) patron Ashok Singhal on Thursday said that the days of divisive politics that some so called secular parties play are over.
TEHRAN (FNA)- Commander of the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) in Kordestan Province Brigadier General Mohammad Hossein Rajabi urged Muslim nations, specially Iraqis from all walks of life, to grow more united to foil the divisive plots hatched by the enemies to destabilize regional peace and stability.
I believe these to be factually incorrect and divisive.
Mr Cameron told campaigning MP John Baron: "It would be divisive to offer nuclear test veterans this level of recognition for being involved in this project, when those who have undertaken other specialist duties would not be receiving the same.
Despite her deeply divisive politics, Margaret Thatcher did successfully yank Britain out of its bloated welfarist slumber and in doing so, truly helped make free- market capitalism the default setting for much of the world.
The passage into law of the Responsible Parenthood Act closes a highly divisive chapter of our history -- a chapter borne of the convictions of those who argued for, or against this Act," Valte said in a statement.