divorce


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di·vorce

 (dĭ-vôrs′)
n.
1.
a. The legal dissolution of a marriage.
b. A court order or other document establishing such a dissolution.
2. A separation between things that were once connected or associated.
v. di·vorced, di·vorc·ing, di·vorc·es
v.tr.
1. To dissolve the marriage bond between (two people).
2. To end marriage with (one's spouse) by way of legal divorce.
3. To cut off; separate or disunite: an idea that was completely divorced from reality. See Synonyms at separate.
v.intr.
To obtain a divorce.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dīvortium, from dīvortere, to divert, variant of dīvertere; see divert.]

di·vor·cé

 (dĭ-vôr-sā′, -sē′, -vôr′sā′, -sē′)
n.
A divorced man.

[French, masculine past participle of divorcer, to divorce, from Old French, from divorce, divorce; see divorce.]

divorce

(dɪˈvɔːs)
n
1. (Law) the dissolution of a marriage by judgment of a court or by accepted custom
2. (Law) a judicial decree declaring a marriage to be dissolved
3. a separation, esp one that is total or complete
vb
4. (Law) to separate or be separated by divorce; give or obtain a divorce (to a couple or from one's spouse)
5. (tr) to remove or separate, esp completely
[C14: from Old French, from Latin dīvortium from dīvertere to separate; see divert]
diˈvorceable adj
diˈvorcer n
diˈvorcive adj

divorcé

(dɪˈvɔːseɪ)
n
(Law) a man who has been divorced

di•vorce

(dɪˈvɔrs, -ˈvoʊrs)

n., v. -vorced, -vorc•ing. n.
1. a judicial declaration dissolving a marriage and releasing both spouses from all matrimonial obligations.
2. any formal separation of husband and wife according to established custom.
3. total separation; disunion.
v.t.
4. to separate by divorce.
5. to break the marriage contract between oneself and (one's spouse) by divorce.
6. to separate; cut off.
v.i.
7. to get a divorce.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin dīvortium, dīvertium branching point, divorce =dīvert(ere) (see divert) + -ium -ium1]
di•vorce′a•ble, adj.
di•vorc′er, n.
di•vor′cive, adj.

di•vor•cé

(dɪ vɔrˈseɪ, -voʊr-, -ˈvɔr seɪ, -ˈvoʊr-)

n.
a divorced man.
[1805–15; < French, past participle of divorcer < Medieval Latin dīvortiāre to divorce]

divorce


Past participle: divorced
Gerund: divorcing

Imperative
divorce
divorce
Present
I divorce
you divorce
he/she/it divorces
we divorce
you divorce
they divorce
Preterite
I divorced
you divorced
he/she/it divorced
we divorced
you divorced
they divorced
Present Continuous
I am divorcing
you are divorcing
he/she/it is divorcing
we are divorcing
you are divorcing
they are divorcing
Present Perfect
I have divorced
you have divorced
he/she/it has divorced
we have divorced
you have divorced
they have divorced
Past Continuous
I was divorcing
you were divorcing
he/she/it was divorcing
we were divorcing
you were divorcing
they were divorcing
Past Perfect
I had divorced
you had divorced
he/she/it had divorced
we had divorced
you had divorced
they had divorced
Future
I will divorce
you will divorce
he/she/it will divorce
we will divorce
you will divorce
they will divorce
Future Perfect
I will have divorced
you will have divorced
he/she/it will have divorced
we will have divorced
you will have divorced
they will have divorced
Future Continuous
I will be divorcing
you will be divorcing
he/she/it will be divorcing
we will be divorcing
you will be divorcing
they will be divorcing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been divorcing
you have been divorcing
he/she/it has been divorcing
we have been divorcing
you have been divorcing
they have been divorcing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been divorcing
you will have been divorcing
he/she/it will have been divorcing
we will have been divorcing
you will have been divorcing
they will have been divorcing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been divorcing
you had been divorcing
he/she/it had been divorcing
we had been divorcing
you had been divorcing
they had been divorcing
Conditional
I would divorce
you would divorce
he/she/it would divorce
we would divorce
you would divorce
they would divorce
Past Conditional
I would have divorced
you would have divorced
he/she/it would have divorced
we would have divorced
you would have divorced
they would have divorced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.divorce - the legal dissolution of a marriagedivorce - the legal dissolution of a marriage
separation - the social act of separating or parting company; "the separation of church and state"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Verb1.divorce - part; cease or break association with; "She disassociated herself from the organization when she found out the identity of the president"
break up, part, split, split up, separate, break - discontinue an association or relation; go different ways; "The business partners broke over a tax question"; "The couple separated after 25 years of marriage"; "My friend and I split up"
2.divorce - get a divorce; formally terminate a marriage; "The couple divorced after only 6 months"
break up, part, split, split up, separate, break - discontinue an association or relation; go different ways; "The business partners broke over a tax question"; "The couple separated after 25 years of marriage"; "My friend and I split up"

divorce

noun
2. breach, break, split, falling-out (informal), disagreement, feud, rift, bust-up (informal), rupture, abyss, chasm, schism, estrangement a divorce between the government and trade unions
verb
1. separate, break up, split up, part company, end your marriage, annul your marriage, dissolve your marriage My parents divorced when I was young.
2. separate, divide, isolate, detach, distance, sever, disconnect, dissociate, set apart, disunite, sunder We have been able to divorce sex from reproduction.

divorce

noun
The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
verb
To become or cause to become apart one from another:
Idioms: part company, set at odds.
Translations
طَلاقيُطَلِّقيَفْصِل
rozvodrozvéstoddělit
skilsmisseadskilleblive skiltskille
avioeroeroerotaerottaaerottelu
razvod
váláselváláselválasztelválikszétválaszt
aîskiljaskilja viîskilnaîur
離婚
이혼
skyrybos
atdalītlaulības šķiršanašķirtšķirt laulībušķirties
despărţidespărţiredivorţ
ločitevločiti se
brakorazvodrazvod
skilsmässaäktenskapsskillnad
การหย่า
sự ly dị

divorce

[dɪˈvɔːs]
A. N
1. (Jur) → divorcio m
to get a divorcedivorciarse (from de)
2. (fig) → separación f (from de)
B. VT
1. (Jur) → divorciarse de
to get divorceddivorciarse
2. (fig) → separar
to divorce sth from sthseparar algo de algo
C. VIdivorciarse
D. CPD divorce court Ntribunal m de pleitos matrimoniales
divorce proceedings NPLpleito msing de divorcio
divorce rate Ntasa f de divorcio

divorcé

[dəˈvɔːseɪ] Ndivorciado m

divorce

[dɪˈvɔːrs]
ndivorce m
vt
[+ husband, wife] → divorcer de
(= separate) to divorce sth from sth → séparer qch de qch
to be divorced from sth → être séparé(e) de qch
vi [couple] → divorcer
modif [rate, case, lawyer, papers, proceedings, settlement] → de divorce

divorcé

[dɪˌvɔːrˈsiː] n (mainly US)divorcé m

divorce

n (Jur) → Scheidung f(from von); (fig)Trennung f; he wants a divorceer will sich scheiden lassen; to get a divorce (from somebody)sich (von jdm) scheiden lassen
vt
husband, wifesich scheiden lassen von; to get divorcedsich scheiden lassen
(fig)trennen
visich scheiden lassen; they divorced last yearsie haben sich letztes Jahr scheiden lassen

divorcé

divorce

[dɪˈvɔːs]
1. ndivorzio
divorce proceedings → pratiche fpl per il divorzio
2. vidivorziare
3. vtdivorziare da (fig) → separare
she divorced him last year → ha divorziato da lui l'anno scorso

divorcé

[dɪˈvɔːseɪ] ndivorziato

divorce

(diˈvoːs) noun
the legal ending of a marriage. Divorce is becoming more common nowadays.
verb
1. to end one's marriage (with). He's divorcing her for desertion; They were divorced two years ago.
2. to separate. You can't divorce these two concepts.

divorce

طَلاق rozvod skilsmisse Scheidung διαζύγιο divorcio avioero divorce razvod divorzio 離婚 이혼 scheiding skilsmisse rozwód divórcio развод skilsmässa การหย่า boşanma sự ly dị 离婚

divorce

n. divorcio, disolución.

divorce

n divorcio; vt divorciarse de; She divorced him..Se divorció de él; vi divorciarse
References in classic literature ?
I took `Napoleon Announcing the Divorce to Josephine' for my frontispiece.
Is that woman going to get a divorce from my son," she asked, "now that he's in trouble?
On the other hand, if wage slavery were abolished, and I could earn some spare money without paying tribute to an exploiting capitalist, then there would be a magazine for the purpose of interpreting and popularizing the gospel of Friedrich Nietzsche, the prophet of Evolution, and also of Horace Fletcher, the inventor of the noble science of clean eating; and incidentally, perhaps, for the discouraging of long skirts, and the scientific breeding of men and women, and the establishing of divorce by mutual consent.
Whatever you may think of my determination, do not divorce me from your confidence; and think that, in whatever I do, I act with a heart wholly given to my people.
The shock which her marriage had given me," he continued, in a voice of great agitation, "was of trifling weight--was nothing to what I felt when I heard, about two years afterwards, of her divorce.
The marriage being a perfectly legal one, and the wife's misconduct prior to the ceremony giving her husband no claim to his release from her by divorce, it was only possible to appeal to her sense of her own interests.
For example: You brought a divorce case, or a restitution case, into the Consistory.
When poor Southwark got into the divorce court, their indignation was quite magnificent.
The unfortunate queen, who was constantly threatened with divorce, exile, and trial even, turned pale under her rouge, and could not refrain from saying, "But why this visit, sire?
The magistrates freely discussed their political views; the military part of the company talked unreservedly of Moscow and Leipsic, while the women commented on the divorce of Josephine.
There they do not allow the details of the trials that take place in the divorce courts to be published for the amusement or criticism of the public.
He wouldn't let me know any of his men friends, except those who were over seventy, like poor Lord Ashton: who afterwards, by the way, was brought into the Divorce Court.