divulge

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di·vulge

 (dĭ-vŭlj′)
tr.v. di·vulged, di·vulg·ing, di·vulg·es
1. To make known (something private or secret).
2. Archaic To proclaim publicly.

[Middle English divulgen, from Old French divulguer, from Latin dīvulgāre, to publish : dī-, dis-, among; see dis- + vulgāre, to spread among the multitude (from vulgus, common people).]

di·vul′gence n.
di·vulg′er n.

divulge

(daɪˈvʌldʒ)
vb
(tr; may take a clause as object) to make known (something private or secret); disclose
[C15: from Latin dīvulgāre, from di-2 + vulgāre to spread among the people, from vulgus the common people]
diˈvulgence, diˈvulgement n
diˈvulger n

di•vulge

(dɪˈvʌldʒ, daɪ-)

v.t. -vulged, -vulg•ing.
to disclose or reveal (something private, secret, or previously unknown).
[1425–75; late Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin dīvulgāre=dī- di-2 + vulgāre to make common, derivative of vulgus the common people]
di•vulge′ment, n.
di•vulg′er, n.

divulge


Past participle: divulged
Gerund: divulging

Imperative
divulge
divulge
Present
I divulge
you divulge
he/she/it divulges
we divulge
you divulge
they divulge
Preterite
I divulged
you divulged
he/she/it divulged
we divulged
you divulged
they divulged
Present Continuous
I am divulging
you are divulging
he/she/it is divulging
we are divulging
you are divulging
they are divulging
Present Perfect
I have divulged
you have divulged
he/she/it has divulged
we have divulged
you have divulged
they have divulged
Past Continuous
I was divulging
you were divulging
he/she/it was divulging
we were divulging
you were divulging
they were divulging
Past Perfect
I had divulged
you had divulged
he/she/it had divulged
we had divulged
you had divulged
they had divulged
Future
I will divulge
you will divulge
he/she/it will divulge
we will divulge
you will divulge
they will divulge
Future Perfect
I will have divulged
you will have divulged
he/she/it will have divulged
we will have divulged
you will have divulged
they will have divulged
Future Continuous
I will be divulging
you will be divulging
he/she/it will be divulging
we will be divulging
you will be divulging
they will be divulging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been divulging
you have been divulging
he/she/it has been divulging
we have been divulging
you have been divulging
they have been divulging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been divulging
you will have been divulging
he/she/it will have been divulging
we will have been divulging
you will have been divulging
they will have been divulging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been divulging
you had been divulging
he/she/it had been divulging
we had been divulging
you had been divulging
they had been divulging
Conditional
I would divulge
you would divulge
he/she/it would divulge
we would divulge
you would divulge
they would divulge
Past Conditional
I would have divulged
you would have divulged
he/she/it would have divulged
we would have divulged
you would have divulged
they would have divulged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.divulge - make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secretdivulge - make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret; "The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold"; "The actress won't reveal how old she is"; "bring out the truth"; "he broke the news to her"; "unwrap the evidence in the murder case"
blackwash - bring (information) out of concealment
muckrake - explore and expose misconduct and scandals concerning public figures; "This reporter was well-known for his muckraking"
blow - cause to be revealed and jeopardized; "The story blew their cover"; "The double agent was blown by the other side"
out - reveal (something) about somebody's identity or lifestyle; "The gay actor was outed last week"; "Someone outed a CIA agent"
come out of the closet, out, come out - to state openly and publicly one's homosexuality; "This actor outed last year"
spring - produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; "He sprang these news on me just as I was leaving"
get around, get out, break - be released or become known; of news; "News of her death broke in the morning"
betray, bewray - reveal unintentionally; "Her smile betrayed her true feelings"
confide - reveal in private; tell confidentially
leak - tell anonymously; "The news were leaked to the paper"
babble out, blab, blab out, let the cat out of the bag, peach, spill the beans, tattle, babble, talk, sing - divulge confidential information or secrets; "Be careful--his secretary talks"
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"
reveal - disclose directly or through prophets; "God rarely reveal his plans for Mankind"

divulge

verb make known, tell, reveal, publish, declare, expose, leak, confess, exhibit, communicate, spill (informal), disclose, proclaim, betray, uncover, impart, promulgate, let slip, blow wide open (slang), get off your chest (informal), cough (slang), out (informal), spill your guts about (slang) He was charged with divulging state secrets.
hide, conceal, keep secret

divulge

verb
To disclose in a breach of confidence:
Informal: spill.
Archaic: discover.
Translations
rozgłaszaćujawnić

divulge

[daɪˈvʌldʒ] VTdivulgar, revelar

divulge

[daɪˈvʌldʒ] vt [+ secret, details] → divulguer, révéler

divulge

vtpreisgeben (sth to sb jdm etw)

divulge

[daɪˈvʌldʒ] vtdivulgare, rivelare; (evidence, information) → rendere pubblico/a
References in classic literature ?
The truth, however, has after all a merit of its own, and the great kinsfolk of poor Lord Ernest have but little to lose by its divulgence.
An example of these unedited divulgences is the public company executive who bragged about his sexual prowess on Twitter, or the one who used a racist epithet on YouTube.
282) "If the Fifth Amendment is to stand for our constitutional preference for an accusatorial system," the court argued, "it must protect the divulgence of the contents of one's mind, one's thought processes, when those testimonial divulgences--be they oral or written communications-would self-incriminate.