jinn

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jin·ni

or jin·nee also djin·ni  (jĭn′ē, jĭ-nē′)
n. pl. jinn also djinn (jĭn)
In the Koran and Muslim tradition, a spirit often capable of assuming human or animal form and exercising supernatural influence over people.

[Arabic jinnī, demonic, demon, from jinn, demons, from janna, to cover, conceal; see gnn in Semitic roots.]
Usage Note: According to the Koran, humans share this world with another race of mortal beings, the jinn, that God created from pure, smokeless fire and endowed with supernatural powers. In Arabic, the noun jinn designates these beings as a group. An adjective jinnī, "belonging to the jinn," can be made from jinn by the addition of the suffix -ī. Jinnī can then itself be used as a noun with the sense "one belonging to the jinn, a jinni." In this way, the usual word for a single male member of the jinn is jinnī, while a single female is called a jinnīya, using the feminine form of jinnī. (This way of making singulars from nouns denoting groups is common in Arabic—the noun 'arab means "the Arabs, the Arab people," and its derivative 'arabī means "Arabic" and "an Arab.") Following Arabic usage, some writers in English use the English noun jinn only as a plural, to designate the group: These jinn are kindly, while those jinn are malevolent. The English noun jinni then fills the role of a singular for this noun: He met a kindly jinni in the desert. However, other writers in English take jinn as a singular noun designating a single member of the jinn race: He met a kindly jinn in the desert. These writers may then use the uninflected plural jinn, as in These jinn are kindly, and some even use a regularly formed English plural jinns, as in Those jinns are harmful.

jinn

(dʒɪn)
n
(Islam) (often functioning as singular) the plural of jinni

jinn

(dʒɪn)

also jin•ni

(dʒɪˈni, ˈdʒɪn i)

n., pl. jinns also jin•nis, (esp. collectively) jinn also jin•ni.
(in Islamic myth) any of a class of spirits, lower than the angels, capable of appearing in human and animal forms and influencing humankind.
[1675–85; pl. of Arabic jinnī demon]

jinn

An Arab name for a spirit.
Translations

jinn

nDschinn m
References in periodicals archive ?
No, but a kung-fu master in the 19th century Tai Djin is rumoured to have had a rare genetic condition called hypertrichosis that covered him in hair.
Solomon Issued command, and a swift Djin sprang forth Bearing the prince aloft, so that he came To Coromandel, ere the fruit--which fell Out of the fig--had touched the marble Floor.
The husband explained to them that his wife was influenced by djin and he used to read Holy Quran to calm her.
Il compte deja a son actif des critiques de dix pieces de theatre jouees dans plusieurs manifestations en Algerie ou ailleurs (Constantine, capitale de la culture arabe 2015, Tlemcen, capitale de la culture islamique 2011, le Festival international du theatre du soleil a Paris, le Festival national du theatre humoristique, le Festival des marionnettes a Mostaghanem-) telles que [beaucoup moins que] Telleli et le Djin [beaucoup plus grand que] produite par le Theatre regional de Constantine qui a remporte le premier prix du Festival de Tunis.
These six have been identified as Aliu Rrahman, 30, Frani Petrit, 32, Ekrem Gashi, 35, Dedaj Astrit, 23, Abazi Gentijan, 24, and 36-year-old Djerdji Djin.
They said he was a member of the organized crime group nicknamed as Djin.
Kwaa-si Djin, a lawyer in Accra who often represents investors in land purchases, thinks that the market is only responding to the forces.
They were named Aliu Rahman, 30, from Serbia, Frani Petrit, 32, from Albania, Ekrem Gashi, 35, from Kosovo, Dedaj Astrit, 23, from Albania, Abazi Gentijan, 24, from Kosovo, and Djerdji Djin, 36, from Macedonia.
The Masquerade is quite resplendent with a silver theme and in the run-up to Christmas they now have a DJin the shape of Miss Candi Take-It starting from 5pm on Fridays.
Aliens, witches, vampires, portals to hell, zombies, djin, Aztec priests, chupacabra, zombies, and more dance a magical, oppressive, often violent reel through coal, ash, and blood.
As the daughter of Mary Hopkin, who started her career on The Beatles' Apple Records, and Tony Visconti, who produced David Bowie, T-Rex and also Angelique Kidjo's album Djin Djin, which won a Grammy in 2008, Jessica undoubtedly has music in her blood.
She won the Grammy for Best Contemporary World Music Album in 2008 for her album DJIN DJIN, her latest release on Razor & Tie/Starbucks Entertainment.