do by


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do 1

 (do͞o)
v. did (dĭd), done (dŭn), do·ing, does (dŭz)
v.tr.
1.
a. To perform or execute; carry out: do one's assigned task; do a series of business deals.
b. To fulfill the requirements of: did my duty at all times.
c. To perform the tasks or behaviors typically associated with (something), especially as part of one's character or normal duties: That talk show host just doesn't do subtle.
d. To participate in (a meal or an activity) with another person: Let's do brunch on Sunday.
2.
a. To produce, especially by creative effort: do a play on Broadway.
b. To play the part or role of in a creative production: did Elizabeth I in the film.
c. To mimic: "doing the Southern voice, improvising it inventively as he goes along" (William H. Pritchard).
3.
a. To bring about; effect: Crying won't do any good now.
b. To render; give: do equal justice to the opposing sides; do honor to one's family.
4. To put forth; exert: Do the best you can.
5.
a. To attend to in such a way as to take care of or put in order: did the bedrooms before the guests arrived.
b. To prepare for further use especially by washing: did the dishes.
6.
a. To set or style (the hair).
b. To apply cosmetics to: did her face.
7. To have as an occupation or profession: Have you decided what you will do after college?
8. To work out by studying: do a homework assignment.
9. Used as a substitute for an antecedent verb or verb phrase: He can play the piano, and I can do that, too.
10. Informal
a. To travel (a specified distance): did a mile in four minutes.
b. To go (a specified rate): did 80 mph on the highway.
c. To make a tour of; visit: "[He] did 15 countries of Western Europe in only a few days" (R.W. Apple, Jr.).
11.
a. To be sufficient in meeting the needs of; serve: This room will do us very nicely.
b. Informal To serve (a prison term): did time in jail; did five years for tax fraud.
12. Slang To cheat; swindle: do a relative out of an inheritance.
13. Slang To take (drugs) illegally: "If you do drugs you are going to be in continual trouble" (Jimmy Breslin).
14. Slang To kill; murder.
15. Vulgar Slang To have sex with or bring to orgasm.
v.intr.
1. To behave or conduct oneself; act: Do as I say and you won't get into trouble.
2.
a. To get along; fare: students who do well at school.
b. To carry on; manage: I could do without your interference.
c. To make good use of something because of need: I could do with a hot bath.
3.
a. To serve a specified purpose: This coat will do for another season.
b. To be proper or fitting: Such behavior just won't do.
4. To take place; happen: What's doing in London this time of year?
5. Used as a substitute for an antecedent verb: worked as hard as everyone else did.
6. Used after another verb for emphasis: Run quickly, do!
v.aux.
1. Used with the infinitive without to in questions, negative statements, and inverted phrases: Do you understand? I did not sleep well. Little did we know what was in store for us.
2. Used as a means of emphasis: I do want to be sure.
n. pl. dos or do's
1. A statement of what should be done: a list of the dos and don'ts of management.
2. Informal An entertainment; a party: attended a big do at the embassy.
3. A commotion.
4. A hairdo.
5. Chiefly British Slang A swindle; a cheat.
6. Slang Fecal matter; excrement.
Phrasal Verbs:
do by
To behave with respect to; deal with: The children have done well by their aged parents.
do for
To care or provide for; take care of.
do in Slang
1. To tire completely; exhaust: The marathon did me in.
2. To kill.
3. To ruin utterly: Huge losses on the stock market did many investors in.
do up
1. To adorn or dress lavishly: The children were all done up in matching outfits.
2. To wrap and tie (a package).
3. To fasten: do up the buttons on a dress.
do without
To manage despite the absence of: We had to do without a telephone on the island.
Idioms:
can/could do without
To prefer not to experience or deal with: I could do without their complaints.
do a disappearing act Informal
To vanish.
do away with
1. To make an end of; eliminate.
2. To destroy; kill.
do it Vulgar Slang
To engage in sexual intercourse.
do (one) proud
To act or perform in a way that gives cause for pride.
do (one's) bit
To make an individual contribution toward an overall effort.
do (one's) business
Slang To defecate. Used especially of a pet.
do (one's) own thing Slang
To do what one does best or finds most enjoyable: "I get paid to try cases and to do my thing on trial" (Bruce Cutler).

[Middle English don, from Old English dōn; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

do 2

 (dō)
n. Music
The first tone of the diatonic scale in solfeggio.

[Italian, more singable replacement of ut; see gamut.]

do 3

 (do͞o)
n. pl. dos Slang
A hairdo.

DO

abbr.
1. Doctor of Optometry
2. Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine

do by

vb
(intr, preposition) to treat in the manner specified: employers do well by hard working employees.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.do by - interact in a certain waydo by - interact in a certain way; "Do right by her"; "Treat him with caution, please"; "Handle the press reporters gently"
treat - regard or consider in a specific way; "I treated his advances as a joke"
bemock, mock - treat with contempt; "The new constitution mocks all democratic principles"
deal, plow, handle, treat, cover, address - act on verbally or in some form of artistic expression; "This book deals with incest"; "The course covered all of Western Civilization"; "The new book treats the history of China"
disregard, ignore, snub, cut - refuse to acknowledge; "She cut him dead at the meeting"
interact - act together or towards others or with others; "He should interact more with his colleagues"
wrong - treat unjustly; do wrong to
handle with kid gloves - handle with great care and sensitivity; "You have to handle the students with kid gloves"
criminalize - treat as a criminal
nurse - treat carefully; "He nursed his injured back by lying in bed several hours every afternoon"; "He nursed the flowers in his garden and fertilized them regularly"
strong-arm - handle roughly; "He was strong-armed by the policemen"
ride roughshod, run roughshod - treat inconsiderately or harshly
upstage - treat snobbishly, put in one's place
rough-house - treat in a rough or boisterous manner
brutalise, brutalize - treat brutally
do well by - treat with respect and consideration; "children should do well by their parents"
gloss over, skate over, skimp over, slur over, smooth over - treat hurriedly or avoid dealing with properly
abuse, ill-treat, ill-use, maltreat, mistreat, step - treat badly; "This boss abuses his workers"; "She is always stepping on others to get ahead"
baby, cocker, coddle, cosset, featherbed, mollycoddle, pamper, spoil, indulge - treat with excessive indulgence; "grandparents often pamper the children"; "Let's not mollycoddle our students!"
Translations