docile


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doc·ile

 (dŏs′əl, -īl′)
adj.
1. Ready and willing to be taught; teachable.
2. Yielding to supervision, direction, or management; tractable.

[Latin docilis, from docēre, to teach; see dek- in Indo-European roots.]

doc′ile·ly adv.
do·cil′i·ty (dŏ-sĭl′ĭ-tē, dō-) n.

docile

(ˈdəʊsaɪl)
adj
1. easy to manage, control, or discipline; submissive
2. rare ready to learn; easy to teach
[C15: from Latin docilis easily taught, from docēre to teach]
ˈdocilely adv
docility n

doc•ile

(ˈdɒs əl; Brit. ˈdoʊ saɪl)

adj.
1. easily managed or handled.
2. readily trained or taught.
[1475–85; < Latin docilis readily taught]
doc′ile•ly, adv.
do•cil′i•ty (-ˈsɪl ɪ ti) n.
docent, docible, docile - Docent comes from Latin docere, "to teach"; docible is "capable of learning" and docile first meant "teachable."
See also related terms for teacher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.docile - willing to be taught or led or supervised or directed; "the docile masses of an enslaved nation"
obedient - dutifully complying with the commands or instructions of those in authority; "an obedient soldier"; "obedient children"; "a little man obedient to his wife"; "the obedient colonies...are heavily taxed; the refractory remain unburdened"- Edmund Burke
manipulable, tractable - easily managed (controlled or taught or molded); "tractable young minds"; "the natives...being...of an intelligent tractable disposition"- Samuel Butler
obstinate, stubborn, unregenerate - tenaciously unwilling or marked by tenacious unwillingness to yield
2.docile - ready and willing to be taught; "docile pupils eager for instruction"; "teachable youngsters"
manipulable, tractable - easily managed (controlled or taught or molded); "tractable young minds"; "the natives...being...of an intelligent tractable disposition"- Samuel Butler
3.docile - easily handled or managed; "a gentle old horse, docile and obedient"
tamed, tame - brought from wildness into a domesticated state; "tame animals"; "fields of tame blueberries"

docile

docile

adjective
1. Easily managed or handled:
2. Willing to carry out the wishes of others:
Translations
طَيِّع، لَيِّن
poslušnýpoddajný
føjeligmedgørlig
òægur, auîsveipur, viîráîanlegur
paklusniai

docile

[ˈdəʊsaɪl] ADJdócil, sumiso

docile

[ˈdəʊsaɪl] adj [person, animal] → docile

docile

adjsanftmütig; animalfromm; acceptancewiderstandslos

docile

[ˈdəʊsaɪl] adjdocile

docile

(ˈdəusail) , ((American) ˈdosl) adjective
(of a person or animal) quiet and easy to manage. a docile child/pony.
ˈdocilely adverb
doˈcility (douˈsiliti) noun
References in classic literature ?
Finding the child more docile and amiable than her sister, the old lady felt it her duty to try and counteract, as far as possible, the bad effects of home freedom and indulgence.
It seemed to me that he despised him for being so simple and docile.
Yet was this Nantucketer a man with some good-hearted traits; and this Lakeman, a mariner, who though a sort of devil indeed, might yet by inflexible firmness, only tempered by that common decency of human recognition which is the meanest slave's right; thus treated, this Steelkilt had long been retained harmless and docile.
Tom was "fractious," as Roxy called it, and overbearing; Chambers was meek and docile.
Harriet certainly was not clever, but she had a sweet, docile, grateful disposition, was totally free from conceit, and only desiring to be guided by any one she looked up to.
I found my pupil sufficiently docile, though disinclined to apply: she had not been used to regular occupation of any kind.
Her seventeenth birthday was now near at hand; she had decided on celebrating it by acting a play; had issued her orders accordingly; and had been obeyed by her docile parents as implicitly as usual.
My brave wife," returned Defarge, standing before her with his head a little bent, and his hands clasped at his back, like a docile and attentive pupil before his catechist, "I do not question all this.
Snell, like a docile clairvoyante, who would really not make a mistake if she could help it.
Then he bought new machines; and, as women and children could work these as well as men, and were cheaper and more docile, he turned away about seventy out of every hundred of his HANDS (so he called the men), and replaced them by their wives and children, who made money for him faster than ever.
In place of the noisy and obstreperous boy came the docile, soft-voiced girl.
Oh, now I have hit it," said Don Quixote; "thou wouldst say thou art so docile, tractable, and gentle that thou wilt take what I say to thee, and submit to what I teach thee.