dock


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dock 1

 (dŏk)
n.
1.
a. A platform extending from a shore over water, used to secure, protect, and provide access to a boat or ship; a pier.
b. docks An area along a commercial waterfront having docks or piers.
c. The area of water between two piers or alongside a pier that receives a vessel for loading, unloading, or repairs: The boat moved slowly into the dock.
2. A floating platform attached to a mooring and used as a rest or play area when swimming.
3. A platform or door at which trucks or trains load or unload cargo.
4. Computers See docking station.
v. docked, dock·ing, docks
v.tr.
1. To maneuver (a vessel or vehicle) into or next to a dock.
2. To couple (two or more spacecraft, for example) in space.
v.intr.
To move or come into or next to a dock.

[Early Modern English dok, area of mud in which a ship can rest at low tide, dock; akin to Middle Dutch docke, area of water between two piers or alongside a pier, of unknown origin.]

dock 2

 (dŏk)
n.
1. The solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail.
2. The tail of an animal after it has been bobbed or clipped.
tr.v. docked, dock·ing, docks
1. To clip short or cut off (an animal's tail, for example).
2. To deprive of a benefit or a part of one's wages, especially as a punishment: The company docks its employees for unauthorized absences.
3. To withhold or deduct a part from (one's salary or wages).

[Middle English dok.]

dock 3

 (dŏk)
n.
A demarcated or enclosed space where the defendant stands or sits in a court of law.
Idiom:
in the dock
On trial or under intense scrutiny.

[Obsolete Flemish docke, cage.]

dock 4

 (dŏk)
n.
See sorrel1.

[Middle English, from Old English docce.]

dock

(dɒk)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a wharf or pier
2. (Civil Engineering) a space between two wharves or piers for the mooring of ships
3. (Civil Engineering) an area of water that can accommodate a ship and can be closed off to allow regulation of the water level
4. (Civil Engineering) short for dry dock
5. (Theatre) short for scene dock
6. (Civil Engineering) chiefly US and Canadian a platform from which lorries, goods trains, etc, are loaded and unloaded
vb
7. (Nautical Terms) to moor (a vessel) at a dock or (of a vessel) to be moored at a dock
8. (Nautical Terms) to put (a vessel) into a dry dock for repairs or (of a vessel) to come into a dry dock
9. (Astronautics) (of two spacecraft) to link together in space or link together (two spacecraft) in space
[C14: from Middle Dutch docke; perhaps related to Latin ducere to lead]

dock

(dɒk)
n
1. (Zoology) the bony part of the tail of an animal, esp a dog or sheep
2. (Zoology) the part of an animal's tail left after the major part of it has been cut off
vb (tr)
3. (Veterinary Science) to remove (the tail or part of the tail) of (an animal) by cutting through the bone: to dock a tail; to dock a horse.
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) to deduct (an amount) from (a person's wages, pension, etc): they docked a third of his wages.
[C14: dok, of uncertain origin]

dock

(dɒk)
n
(Law) an enclosed space in a court of law where the accused sits or stands during his or her trial
[C16: from Flemish dok sty]

dock

(dɒk)
n
1. (Plants) any of various temperate weedy plants of the polygonaceous genus Rumex, having greenish or reddish flowers and typically broad leaves
2. (Plants) any of several similar or related plants
[Old English docce; related to Middle Dutch, Old Danish docke, Gaelic dogha]

dock1

(dɒk)

n.
1. a landing pier.
2. the space or waterway between two piers or wharves, as for receiving a ship while in port.
3. such a waterway, enclosed or open, together with the surrounding piers, wharves, etc.
5. a platform for loading and unloading trucks, railway freight cars, etc.
v.t.
6. to bring (a ship or boat) into a dock; lay up in a dock.
7. to place in dry dock, as for repairs or painting.
8. to join (an orbiting space vehicle) with another spacecraft or with a space station.
v.i.
9. to come or go into a dock.
10. (of two space vehicles) to join together while in orbit.
[1505–15; < Middle Dutch doc(ke)]

dock2

(dɒk)

n.
1. the solid or fleshy part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair.
2. the part of a tail left after cutting or clipping.
v.t.
3. to cut off the end of; cut short: to dock a tail.
4. to cut short the tail of.
5. to deduct a part from (wages).
6. to deduct from the wages of, usu. as a punishment.
7. to deprive of something regularly enjoyed: The campers were docked for disobeying their counselor.
[1300–50; Middle English dok, Old English -docca, in fingirdoccana (genitive pl.) finger muscles; c. Frisian dok, Low German docke bundle, Middle High German tocke bundle, sheaf]

dock3

(dɒk)

n.
the place in a courtroom where a prisoner is placed during trial.
[1580–90; perhaps < Dutch dok (dial. sense) cage, pen, hutch]

dock4

(dɒk)

n.
any of various weedy plants of the genus Rumex, buckwheat family, having a long taproot and clusters of small flowers.
[before 1000; Middle English dokke, Old English docce; c. Middle Dutch docke, Middle High German tocke]

dock


Past participle: docked
Gerund: docking

Imperative
dock
dock
Present
I dock
you dock
he/she/it docks
we dock
you dock
they dock
Preterite
I docked
you docked
he/she/it docked
we docked
you docked
they docked
Present Continuous
I am docking
you are docking
he/she/it is docking
we are docking
you are docking
they are docking
Present Perfect
I have docked
you have docked
he/she/it has docked
we have docked
you have docked
they have docked
Past Continuous
I was docking
you were docking
he/she/it was docking
we were docking
you were docking
they were docking
Past Perfect
I had docked
you had docked
he/she/it had docked
we had docked
you had docked
they had docked
Future
I will dock
you will dock
he/she/it will dock
we will dock
you will dock
they will dock
Future Perfect
I will have docked
you will have docked
he/she/it will have docked
we will have docked
you will have docked
they will have docked
Future Continuous
I will be docking
you will be docking
he/she/it will be docking
we will be docking
you will be docking
they will be docking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been docking
you have been docking
he/she/it has been docking
we have been docking
you have been docking
they have been docking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been docking
you will have been docking
he/she/it will have been docking
we will have been docking
you will have been docking
they will have been docking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been docking
you had been docking
he/she/it had been docking
we had been docking
you had been docking
they had been docking
Conditional
I would dock
you would dock
he/she/it would dock
we would dock
you would dock
they would dock
Past Conditional
I would have docked
you would have docked
he/she/it would have docked
we would have docked
you would have docked
they would have docked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dock - an enclosure in a court of law where the defendant sits during the trial
enclosure - a structure consisting of an area that has been enclosed for some purpose
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.dock - any of certain coarse weedy plants with long taproots, sometimes used as table greens or in folk medicinedock - any of certain coarse weedy plants with long taproots, sometimes used as table greens or in folk medicine
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Rumex, Rumex - docks: coarse herbs and shrubs mainly native to north temperate regions
Rumex acetosa, sour dock, garden sorrel - European sorrel with large slightly acidic sagittate leaves grown throughout north temperate zone for salad and spring greens
Rumex acetosella, sheep sorrel, sheep's sorrel - small plant having pleasantly acid-tasting arrow-shaped leaves; common in dry places
bitter dock, broad-leaved dock, Rumex obtusifolius, yellow dock - European dock with broad obtuse leaves and bitter rootstock common as a weed in North America
French sorrel, garden sorrel, Rumex scutatus - low perennial with small silvery-green ovate to hastate leaves
3.dock - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by pilesdock - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats
bitt, bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines); "the road was closed to vehicular traffic with bollards"
levee - a pier that provides a landing place on a river
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
quay - wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline
shipside - the part of a wharf that is next to a ship
4.dock - a platform where trucks or trains can be loaded or unloadeddock - a platform where trucks or trains can be loaded or unloaded
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
5.dock - landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships are loaded and unloaded or repaired; may have gates to let water in or out; "the ship arrived at the dock more than a day late"
dry dock, drydock, graving dock - a large dock from which water can be pumped out; used for building ships or for repairing a ship below its waterline
landing place, landing - structure providing a place where boats can land people or goods
marina - a fancy dock for small yachts and cabin cruisers
harbor, harbour, seaport, haven - a sheltered port where ships can take on or discharge cargo
6.dock - the solid bony part of the tail of an animal as distinguished from the hair
tail - the posterior part of the body of a vertebrate especially when elongated and extending beyond the trunk or main part of the body
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
7.dock - a short or shortened tail of certain animals
tail - the posterior part of the body of a vertebrate especially when elongated and extending beyond the trunk or main part of the body
Verb1.dock - come into dock; "the ship docked"
moor, berth, wharf - come into or dock at a wharf; "the big ship wharfed in the evening"
come in, enter, get in, go in, go into, move into, get into - to come or go into; "the boat entered an area of shallow marshes"
undock - move out of a dock; "We docked at noon"
2.dock - deprive someone of benefits, as a penalty
deprive - keep from having, keeping, or obtaining
3.dock - deduct from someone's wages
deduct, withhold, recoup - retain and refrain from disbursing; of payments; "My employer is withholding taxes"
4.dock - remove or shorten the tail of an animal
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
5.dock - maneuver into a dock; "dock the ships"
drydock, dry-dock - maneuver (a ship) into a drydock
channelise, channelize, guide, maneuver, steer, manoeuver, manoeuvre, point, head, direct - direct the course; determine the direction of travelling
undock - take (a ship) out of a dock; "undock the ship"

dock

1
noun
1. port, haven, harbour, pier, wharf, quay, waterfront, anchorage He brought his boat right into the dock at Southampton.
verb
1. moor, land, anchor, put in, tie up, berth, drop anchor The vessel is about to dock in Singapore
2. (of spacecraft) link up, unite, join, couple, rendezvous, hook up The shuttle is scheduled to dock with the space station.

dock

2
verb
1. cut, reduce, decrease, diminish, cut back, lessen He threatened to dock her fee.
cut increase, raise, boost, augment
2. deduct, remove, take off, discount, debit, knock off, subtract He had a point docked for insulting his opponent.
3. cut off, crop, clip, shorten, curtail, cut short It is an offence for an unqualified person to dock a dog's tail.
Translations
حَوْض أو رَصيف السُّفُنحَوْضُ السُّفْنحَوْض تَحْميل وتَفْريغ السُّفُنقَفَص الأتِّهاميُرسي السَّفينَه
doklavice obžalovanýchlopuchpřistátsnížit
dokdokkedokkernereducereanklagebænk
aitiodokkarihierakkalaituriliittäminen
dok
hafnarsvæîi, höfnleggja aî bryggjusakamannabekkurstÿfa; skerîa
ドック
선거
apcirstapsūdzēto solsatvilktdoksnocirst
lavica obžalovanýchvplávať do doku
dok
docka
อู่เรือ
dokdoklarkesinti yapmakkısa kesmekrıhtım
bến tàu

dock

1 [dɒk] N (Bot) → acedera f, ramaza f

dock

2 [dɒk] VT
1. [+ animal's tail] → cortar, cercenar (frm)
2. (Brit) to dock sb's paydescontar dinero del sueldo a algn
I've been docked £1me han descontado una libra

dock

3 [dɒk]
A. N
1. (Naut) → dársena f, muelle m; (with gates) → dique m
to be in dock (Brit) [ship] → estar en puerto; [car] → estar en el taller
2. docksmuelles mpl, puerto m
B. VT [+ ship] → atracar; [+ spacecraft] → acoplar
C. VI
1. (Naut) → atracar; (loosely) → llegar
the ship has dockedel barco ha atracado
we docked at fivellegamos a las cinco, entramos en el puerto a las cinco
when we docked at Vigocuando llegamos a Vigo
2. [spacecraft] → acoplarse (with a)
D. CPD dock dues NPLderechos mpl de atraque or de dársena
dock labourer, dock laborer (US) N = dock worker dock walloper N (US) = dock worker dock warrant Nresguardo m de muelle, conocimiento m de almacén
dock worker Ntrabajador m portuario

dock

4 [dɒk] N (Brit) (in court) → banquillo m de los acusados

dock

[ˈdɒk]
n
(for loading, unloading and repairs)dock m; (for mooring)quai m, dock m
(LAW) (in court)banc m des accusés
to be in the dock [defendant] → être au banc des accusés
vi [ship] → se mettre à quai; [spaceship] → s'arrimer
to dock with [spaceship] → s'arrimer à
vt
(= cut) [+ money, wages] → retenir; [+ point] → enlever
They docked a third of his wages → Ils lui ont retenu un tiers de son salaire.
[+ ship] → mettre à quai; [+ spaceship] → arrimer docks
npl
the docks → les docks mpldock dues npldroits mpl de bassin

dock

:
dock labourer
dockland
nHafenviertel nt
dock strike
nHafenarbeiterstreik m
dock worker
dockyard
nWerft f

dock

1
nDock nt; (for berthing) → Pier m, → Kai m; docks plHafen m; my car is in dock (inf)mein Wagen ist in der Werkstatt
vtdocken (spec); (Space also) → ankoppeln (→ with an +acc)
vi
(Naut) → anlegen
(Space, two spacecraft) → docken (spec), → ankoppeln; the space shuttle docked with Russia’s space stationdie Raumfähre koppelte or dockte (spec)an die russische Raumstation an

dock

2
n (Jur) → Anklagebank f; to stand in the dockauf der Anklagebank sitzen; “prisoner in the dock„Angeklagte(r)“

dock

3
vt
dog’s tailkupieren; horse’s tailstutzen
wageskürzen; pointsabziehen; to dock £50 off somebody’s wagesjds Lohn um £ 50 kürzen; he was docked 6 points for cheatingihm wurden 6 Punkte wegen Mogeln abgezogen
nkupierter Schwanz; (of horse)gestutzter Schweif

dock

4
n (Bot) → Ampfer m

dock

1 [dɒk]
1. n (Naut) → bacino; (wharf) → molo; (for repairs) → darsena
docks → dock m inv
dock dues → diritti mpl di banchina
2. vtmettere in bacino
3. vientrare in bacino

dock

2 [dɒk] n (in court) → banco degli imputati

dock

3 [dɒk] vt
a. (tail) → mozzare
b. (pay) → decurtare

dock

4 [dɒk] n (Bot) → romice m

dock1

(dok) noun
1. a deepened part of a harbour etc where ships go for loading, unloading, repair etc. The ship was in dock for three weeks.
2. the area surrounding this. He works down at the docks.
3. the box in a law court where the accused person sits or stands.
verb
to (cause to) enter a dock and tie up alongside a quay. The liner docked in Southampton this morning.
ˈdocker noun
a person who works in the docks.
ˈdockyard noun
a naval harbour with docks, stores etc.

dock2

(dok) verb
to cut short or remove part from. The dog's tail had been docked; His wages were docked to pay for the broken window.

dock

حَوْضُ السُّفْن dok dok Dock αποβάθρα dársena, muelle laituri dock dok molo ドック 선거 dok havn dok doca док docka อู่เรือ dok bến tàu 码头
References in classic literature ?
But, the gaol was a vile place, in which most kinds of debauchery and villainy were practised, and where dire diseases were bred, that came into court with the prisoners, and sometimes rushed straight from the dock at my Lord Chief Justice himself, and pulled him off the bench.
When we was put in the dock, I noticed first of all what a gentleman Compeyson looked, wi' his curly hair and his black clothes and his white pocket-handkercher, and what a common sort of a wretch I looked.
It will amount to this: If we have the clue you talk about, I fit out a ship in Bristol dock, and take you and Hawkins here along, and I'll have that treasure if I search a year.
Nor were their ornaments like those in use to-day, set off by Tyrian purple, and silk tortured in endless fashions, but the wreathed leaves of the green dock and ivy, wherewith they went as bravely and becomingly decked as our Court dames with all the rare and far-fetched artifices that idle curiosity has taught them.
Du Bousquier, suspected by Monsieur de Valois of sustaining the priest and being at the bottom of the theatre intrigues, and on whose back the adroit chevalier would in any case have put those sins with his customary cleverness, was in the dock with no lawyer to defend him.
Five hours later we sailed from the roofs of the dock buildings with a fleet of two hundred and fifty battleships, carrying nearly one hundred thousand green warriors, followed by a fleet of transports with our thoats.
Upon the dock and all through the journey to London the Russian had his hands full with Ajax.
The engineers visited the Scotia, which was put in dry dock.
Montgomery steered us round and into a narrow little dock excavated in the beach.
One evening he cast off the painter of a sailboat from the iron ring that secured it to the dock at Leghorn, wrapped himself in his coat and lay down, and said to the crew, -- "To the Island of Elba
The little caravan dismounted in order to pass Les Ecores, a cliff that overhangs the bay, and a few minutes later, at the end of the dock, they entered the yard of the Golden Lamb, an inn kept by Mother David.
As touching the other pilgrims of the Great Carbuncle, the legend goes on to tell, that the worshipful Master Ichabod Pigsnort soon gave up the quest as a desperate speculation, and wisely resolved to betake himself again to his warehouse, near the town dock, in Boston.